Undergraduate Catalog 2005- 2006

Engineering And Applied Sciences, School Of

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

410 Bonner Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-1900

Phone: 716.645.2774
Fax: 716.645.2495
Web: www.eng.buffalo.edu/

Mark H. Karwan
Dean

Robert E. Barnes
Associate Dean

Paul S. Goodman
Associate Dean

John E. Van Benschoten
Associate Dean

Andres Soom
Associate Dean

Kerry Collins-Gross
Assistant Dean

Drexel E. Gidney
Senior Academic Advisor and Director of Minority Programs

Margaret J. Meachem
Senior Academic Advisor

Jane Sinclair
Senior Academic Advisor

Teresa Miklitsch
Senior Academic Advisor

About the Program

The School of Engineering and Applied Sciences offers eight programs leading to the degree of bachelor of science (BS) in engineering: — aerospace, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, industrial, and mechanical engineering. These programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

Engineering Accreditation Commission
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc.
111 Market Place, Suite 1050
Baltimore, MD 21202
410-347-7700
Fax: (410)-625-2238
E-mail: accreditation@abet.org
Web: www.abet.org

BA and BS degrees in computer science are offered through the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, and a BS degree in engineering physics is offered jointly with the Department of Physics.

To meet accreditation requirements, engineering programs must demonstrate that graduates can:
(a) Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
(b) Design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
(c) Design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs
(d) Function on multi-disciplinary teams
(e) Identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
(f) Understand professional and ethical responsibility
(g) Communicate effectively


In addition, graduates must have:
(h)The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
(i) A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
(j) A knowledge of contemporary issues
(k) An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

Candidates from secondary schools (high schools) must have completed mathematics through trigonometry, and should have completed physics and other higher-level courses, including computer science. High school grades, class standing, Regents exam scores, and either Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT) scores are considered in the admission process. Incoming freshmen are admitted directly to the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences or to departments within the school.

The undergraduate engineering program is intended to provide a solid background in engineering fundamentals and to give students an opportunity for hands-on experience throughout the engineering curriculum. The program provides students with a strong technical foundation, enables them to integrate their engineering education within the broader economic and technological environment, and provide students with a desire for continued learning. The curriculum is designed to provide students with flexibility in their individual programs of study and to foster interaction between students and faculty. The undergraduate educational experience is intended to facilitate placement of graduates in a challenging engineering career or to prepare students for advanced study.

SEAS Mission Statement. The mission of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences is to provide effective and high-quality engineering education at the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education levels. Integral to this mission is an infrastructure of expertise and facilities that can support professional engineering education, advanced degree programs and research in important areas of applied science and technology. We will be a leader in forging and maintaining significant, mutually committed partnerships between our faculty and staff and students, alumni, industry, government, and other national and international educational institutions. Our specific mission objectives are to:
(1) Educate students to think critically and creatively, to identify and solve important technological problems, and to practice engineering with technical skill, a high regard for ethical principles and an understanding of economic and environmental realities.
(2) Perform high-quality research that advances applied science or technology while preparing future researchers for industrial, academic, and government positions.
(3) Contribute to interdisciplinary educational and to meet complex technological and societal needs.
(4) Perform high-quality research that advances applied science and technology while preparing future researchers for industrial, academic and government positions.
(5) Provide and coordinate educational, technical, and information services to industry, government, practicing engineers, educators, and the public.
(6) Become a leading catalyst for attracting and increasing the private sector to Western New York and New York State.
(7) Reach out internationally for cooperation in education and research.

Degree Options

The University at Buffalo offers undergraduate study in eight engineering programs leading to the B.S. degree, as well as degree options in computer science leading to a B.A. or B.S. These programs are designed to prepare students to become effective practicing professionals by providing them with solid technical preparation and expertise, exposure to current engineering issues and practice, and the necessary background and training to deal with assignments confidently and professionally.

Acceptance Information

Students are admitted to the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) or directly to a particular engineering major. Students from other colleges and universities are considered for program admission at the time they apply to the engineering school. Acceptance to a program is based on the grade point average (GPA) for all courses completed, GPA in technical courses, and GPA in engineering courses. It is recommended that students have a minimum GPA of 2.5 in each category. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 in each category in order to remain in good standing. Students following the computer science and computer engineering programs must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 to remain in good standing. Failure to maintain the required GPA in any of these categories may result in a student being placed on probation or dismissed from the program. When there is heavy demand for a program, it may be necessary to raise the GPA requirement for that program to accommodate demand.

Course requirements for all engineering programs are similar in the first three semesters. Specific requirements for each degree program are listed in that programs undergraduate catalog entry: aerospace, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, engineering physics, environmental, industrial, and mechanical. Course requirements for computer science are listed in that program's undergraduate catalog entry.

General Education. Entering engineering freshman and transfer students must meet the general education requirements of the University at Buffalo. (See General Education section in this catalog). Engineering students must also satisfy ABET requirements relating to depth and breadth in the humanities and social sciences. Information regarding these requirements is available in the Engineering Office of Student Services, 410 Bonner Hall.

Advisement

Students obtain academic advice and guidance either from the senior academic advisors in the Engineering Office of Student Services or the faculty advisors in their program of study. Students not yet admitted to a program are advised by the Office of Student Services.

All students are required to see a program advisor prior to registering for the fall semester in the senior year. At this mandatory advisement, the remaining courses in a student’s program are selected so that general education, engineering design, and other program requirements are satisfied.

To satisfy the requirements for any of the accredited engineering degrees, students must demonstrate a proficiency in design through a major design exercise and through design efforts in several disciplines. Advisors in each department explain these requirements and assist in the selection of appropriate courses.

Academic Requirements

Students are required to have a minimum GPA of 2.0 overall, as well as in technical and engineering courses taken at the University at Buffalo. In addition, the student must satisfy general education and specific program requirements.

Transfer Policy

Admission of transfer students into an engineering program is granted on the basis of previous college academic performance. Student transcripts are evaluated by the Office of the Dean of Engineering. Course content, contact hours, and grades are evaluated to determine acceptance. Courses completed at other universities and colleges are not automatically accepted for credit. GPA minimums for admission may vary from year to year. In general, transfer students should have a minimum GPA of 2.5 for admission to an engineering program.

Notices of acceptance are sent by the university Office of Admissions. Normally, transfer students who have completed an engineering science program at a community college or the first three years of a 3+2 program at a four-year college can expect to enter the third year of an engineering program at the University at Buffalo. Graduates of technology programs receive limited transfer credit and can expect three to four additional years of study at the university to complete the engineering degree requirements.

Practical Experience and Special Opportunities

Students may obtain practical work experience during their program of study.

Internship programs are available in each department. Students typically work at a local company eight to twelve hours per week for a semester and receive academic credit. More information can be obtained from the departmental representative. The Engineering Career Institute (EAS 495) provides career-effectiveness skills during the summer following completion of a students junior year. Work assignments are paid and extend from the first week of June to the first week of August. Additional information regarding the Engineering Career Institute (ECI) may be obtained from the director of ECI, 415 Bonner Hall.

The Cooperative Engineering Educational Program is available through each department to qualified students following the first semester of the junior year. The cooperative program (co-op) typically involves three paid work sessions that extend the time required to complete the degree requirements of the program by an additional semester. Additional information regarding the co-op program is available from the department representative or from the director of the co-op program, 415 Bonner Hall.


Course Descriptions

EAS 140 Engineering Solutions

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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A first course in engineering. Introduces students to engineering design used to solve technologically based problems in the various fields of engineering, and develops computer skills for problem solving using MAPLE, spreadsheets, network file transfer, remote login, e-mail, UNIX, and algorithmic problem-solving approaches.

 

EAS 200 EE Concepts/Nonmajors

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 108
Corequisites:  MTH 306
Type:  LEC

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Introduces aspects of electrical engineering useful to all the engineering disciplines. Course material includes basic circuit analysis and networks, frequency response, elementary solid-state electronics, digital circuits, and energy conversion and transmission. Not intended for electrical or engineering physics majors. Students may not receive credit for this and EE 202.


EAS 204 Thermodynamics

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:   MTH 142 or equivalent
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Covers conservation of mass, first and second laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties, equilibrium, and their application to physical and chemical systems.

 

EAS 207 Statics

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107, MTH 142
Corequisites:  MTH 241
Type:  LEC

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Applies mechanics to studying static equilibrium of rigid and elastic bodies. Topics include composition and resolution of forces, moments and couple, equivalent force systems, free-body diagrams, equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, forces in trusses and beams, friction forces, first and second moments of area, moments and product of inertia, and methods of virtual work and total potential energy.


EAS 208 Dynamics

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  EAS 207, MTH 241
Corequisites:  MTH 306
Type:  LEC

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Applies mechanics to studying the motion of particles and rigid bodies. Topics include kinematics and kinetics of particles, relative motion, work-energy methods, impulse-momentum methods, kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies, and simple vibration.

 

EAS 209 Mechanics of Solids

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  EAS 207, MTH 241
Corequisites:  MTH 306
Type:  LEC

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Studies the mechanical behavior of solid bodies under various types of loading. Topics include stresses and strain, stress-strain relationships, plane stress and plane strain; shear and bending moments in beams, stresses in beams; deflection of beams, torsion of shafts, buckling of columns, energy methods, and failure criteria.


EAS 230 Higher-Level Language

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  EAS 140
Corequisites:  MTH 142 or equivalent
Type:  LEC/LAB

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A second course in computer technology. Develops detailed knowledge of a higher-level programming language for solution of engineering problems. Extends the knowledge developed initially in EAS 140.

 

EAS 305 Applied Probability

Credits:  4
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  MTH 241
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Introduces probability and its application to engineering problems. Examines sample space, random variables, expected values, limiting theorems, error analysis, and provides introduction to random processes. Students may not receive credit for this course and EAS 308.


EAS 308 Engineering Statistics

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  MTH 241
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Introduces statistical inference, methods of data analysis, point and interval estimation, tests of hypotheses, correlation and regression, and experiment design. Students may not receive credit for this course and EAS 305.

 

EAS 451 Modern Methods of Engineering Computations

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  MTH 306
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces engineering analysis, emphasizing computer use to solve linear and nonlinear problems arising in all branches of engineering. Assignments require familiarity with a high-level programming language or mathematical software such as MATLAB. Topics include matrix operations, eigenvalues, initial-value and boundary-value problems, optimization, and introduction to numerical solution of partial differential equations.


EAS 480 Technical Communications for Engineers

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  upper-division standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Presents skills for producing clear, concise engineering communications, both written and oral. Focuses on the most frequently required communications—reports, memos, letters, and proposals. As a semester-long project, students write a proposal and then present it orally. Covers selecting and organizing information; writing efficiently; using easy-to-read language and formats; and adapting communications to peers, employers, clients, and other audiences.

 

EAS 483 Engineering Procedure Writing

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  upper-division standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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With the quality movement of the ’80s and ’90s, customers are requiring proof of a quality system. Companies provide this proof with procedures. In addition to proof of a quality system, procedures are used for training, standardizing a job, record keeping, and continuously improving a process. Teaches students how to write and manage effective procedures. Focuses on developing the technical and workplace tools an engineer uses to write procedures. As a semester-long project, the course requires students to write a procedure for a real-life company. Covers the following phases of developing a procedure: performing a needs analysis, investigating a process, organizing information, writing efficiently, editing, and validating a procedure. Also teaches students about the latest procedure compliance standards widely used in industry (e.g., ISO9000). Highlights include a field trip and guest speakers from industry.


EAS 490 Engineering Practical Experience

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  senior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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Involves an engineering project carried out during full-time continuous employment with some organization for a minimum of fourteen weeks. Work is under joint supervision of faculty and industrial mentors. Requires a written report. Admission is by exception registration only through the associate dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Students must have been accepted by an industrial organization and a faculty mentor prior to registration.

 

EAS 495 Engineering Career Institute

Credits:  1
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  senior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Involves a pre-employment job searching and enhanced job performance study, emphasizing practical application. Motivated students may obtain full-time, paid, credit-worthy employment. Topics covered include leadership, teamwork, communication, total quality management, and project management, among others. Open to pre-senior year students in any of the engineering majors.


EAS 498 Undergaduate Research and Creative Activity

Credits:  1 - 3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  Permission of Instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Students collaborate with faculty research mentors on an ongoing faculty research project or conduct independent research under the guidance of a faculty member. This experience provides students with an inquiry-based learning opportunity and engages them as active learners in a research setting.

 

ENM 104 Science, Technology, and the Environment

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces the physical, chemical, and biological processes leading to environmental change, and the principles used by scientists and engineers to understand cause-effect relationships in the environment.


ENM 108 The Art and Science of Engineering Design

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces some of the fundamental concepts of problem solving (or engineering design) to college students who major in the humanities and social sciences.

 

ENM 112 Decision Making

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Each day, people find it necessary to make decisions ranging from simple decisions needed to carry out the day’s activities to highly complex decisions upon which substantial consequences ride. Gives each individual a generic perspective in solving problems rather than an instance-dependent solution method. Uses basic mathematical concepts (algebra, elementary probability, combinatorics, and logic) and presents them as tools required in learning some of the solution processes. This approach emphasizes application rather than theory, while giving an interesting flavor to useful mathematical techniques.


ENM 206 Structures-Art, Science, and Culture

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Develops a basic understanding of the scientific rationale behind the structural form for large-scale public works, the urban social context within which such works are funded and built, and the symbolic meaning of structures seen as cultural monuments and works of art.

 

SYS 421 Fundamentals of Digital Signal and Image Processing I

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  senior standing
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Examines the computer application of system theory to signal and image processing. Involves 2-D Fourier theory, image sampling, scanning, and display; image quantization, DPCM and Delta modulation; orthogonal transforms, such as Fast Fourier, Walsh-Hadamard, sinusoidal, and Karhuen-Loeve; digital filtering, zonal, and threshold image filters; and image enhancement. Requires lab experiments.


Updated: Dec 12, 2005 2:47:41 PM

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