Undergraduate Catalog 2005- 2006

Industrial Engineering

Department of Industrial Engineering

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
438 Bell Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-2050

Phone: 716.645.2357
Fax: 716.645.3302
Web: www.ie.buffalo.edu

Colin Drury
Chair

Ann Bisantz
Director of Undergraduate Studies

About the Program

The industrial engineering (IE) program at the University at Buffalo offers undergraduate study leading to the bachelor of science degree. The program prepares students to become effective industrial engineers by enhancing their technical expertise, exposing them to critical issues of engineering practice, and offering them the opportunity to deal with these issues confidently. The program encompasses the rich traditions of the IE profession while incorporating the newer areas of operations research, human factors, production systems engineering, and engineering management.

Industrial engineers (IEs) apply scientific, mathematical, and computer techniques to design, model, analyze, and improve complex systems. Traditionally, IEs have been responsible for the development and operation of systems composed of workers and machines dedicated to producing manufactured goods and services.

More recently, companies have selected IEs to fill positions associated with the management of operations and their design. IEs are well suited to solve modern management problems, using sophisticated quantitative analysis, and dealing with highly technical issues. With the rapid infusion of computer technology into manufacturing processes, coupled with the demand for higher product quality in a competitive marketplace, IEs are in a special position to tackle many corporate challenges.

Career Opportunities/Further Study

After receiving the bachelor of science degree in industrial engineering, students have the option of seeking immediate employment or pursuing advanced study at the graduate level. The range of choices for graduate study is wide and can include management, law, and medicine, as well as graduate study in industrial engineering.

The talents of an industrial engineer are not limited to manufacturing. Industrial engineers apply their skills in a wide range of other areas, including supply and distribution, service industries (such as hospitals, government, educational institutions, and banks), transportation, energy, environment, military, and construction.

Note: Please see the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences entry in this catalog for pre-engineering requirements.

Industrial Engineering - B.S.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Minimum GPA of 2.0 in technical and engineering courses.

Required Courses

Basic science elective (CHE 108, PHY 207, BIO 200 or BIO 201)
CHE 107 General Chemistry for Engineers
EAS 140 Engineering Solutions
EAS 207 Statics
EAS 208 Dynamics or EAS 209 Mechanics of Solids
EAS 230 Higher-Level Language
EAS 305 Applied Probability
EAS 495 Engineering Career Institute (1 credit)
IE 306 Statistical Methods for Engineering
IE 320 Engineering Economy
IE 321 Production Systems
IE 323 Ergonomics
IE 326 Planning for Production
IE 327 Facilities Design
IE 373 Introduction to Operations Research: Deterministic Models
IE 374 Introduction to Operations Research: Probabilistic Models
IE 408 Quality Assurance
IE 424 Experimental Methods
IE 477 Digital Simulation
IE 486, IE 487, or IE 488 Co-op (2)
IE 491 Industrial Internship (1)
MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
MTH 241 College Calculus III
MTH 306 Introduction to Differential Equations
PHY 107 General Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II
PHY 158 Physics II Lab
One engineering science elective; must be chosen from EAS 200, EAS 204, or EAS 209 (if EAS 208 is taken)
One free elective
Five technical electives (two must be IE courses; other choices are restricted to those approved by the department)

Note: IE 491 (1 cr.), EAS 495 (1 cr.), and either IE 486, IE 487, or IE 488 compose the internship requirement.

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major: 113

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall—CHE 107, EAS 140, MTH 141
Spring—MTH 142, PHY 107, basic science elective; IE 101 (optional)

SECOND YEAR
Fall—EAS 207, EAS 230, MTH 241, PHY 108, PHY 158
Spring—EAS 208 or EAS 209; IE 320, MTH 306, one engineering science elective

THIRD YEAR
Fall—EAS 305, IE 321, IE 326, IE 373
Spring—IE 306, IE 323, IE 327, IE 374, EAS 495
Summer—Students can lighten their senior course load by taking IE 487 Co-op to partially fulfill the internship requirement.

FOURTH YEAR
Fall—IE 408, IE 424, IE 477, one free elective
Spring— IE 486 (2 credits, unless taken during the summer), IE 491, three technical electives

Electives and Course Groupings

Students must take a minimum of 15 credit hours of technical electives, distributed as follows:
A minimum of 6 credit hours from the IE department.
A minimum of 6 credit hours of 300/400/500-level courses offered by the Department of Industrial Engineering and other engineering departments or approved departments in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (see the IE director of undergraduate studies for details on departments meeting this criterion).
A maximum of 6 credit hours can be taken from the list below. **
(Note: Limited space may be available for nonmajors in many of the following courses.)

CSE 114 Introduction to Computer Science II
CSE 241 Digital Systems
CSE 250 Algorithms and Data Structures
EAS 480 Technical Communication or EAS 483 Engineering Procedure Writing (both may not be applied)
ECO 405 Microeconomic Theory
ECO 406 Topics in Microeconomic Theory
ECO 407 Microeconomic Theory
MGA 201 Introduction to Accounting 1
MGA 202 Introduction to Accounting 2
PSY 333 Psychology of Work in Organizations
PSY 341 Cognitive Psychology
PSY 342 Cognitive Science
PSY 343 Sensory Processes and Perception
300/400-level management school courses (except MGQ)

**Additional courses in management, economics, and psychology may be applied; please see the IE department for additional information and explicit permission to use the course for a technical elective.


Industrial Engineering/Business Administration - B.S / M.B.A

Acceptance Criteria

Good standing as an industrial engineering student and acceptance as a graduate student by the School of Management.

Required Courses

Basic science elective (CHE 108, PHY 207, BIO 200 or BIO 201)
CHE 107 General Chemistry I
EAS 140 Engineering Solutions
EAS 207 Statics
EAS 208 Dynamics or EAS 209 Mechanics of Solids
EAS 230 Higher Level Language
EAS 305 Applied Probability
EAS 495 Engineering Career Institute (1)
IE 306 Statistical Methods
IE 320 Engineering Economy
IE 321 Production Systems
IE 323 Ergonomics
IE 326 Planning for Production
IE 327 Facilities Design
IE 373 Introduction to Operations Research: Deterministic Models
IE 374 Introduction to Operations Research: Probabilistic Models
IE 408 Quality Assurance
IE 424 Experimental Methods
IE 477 Digital Simulation
IE 486, IE 487, or IE 488 Co-op (2)
IE 491 Industrial Internship (1)
MGA 604 Introduction to Financial Accounting
MGB 601 Behavioral and Organizational Concepts for Management
MGE 601 Economics for Managers
MGF 631 Financial Management
MGM 625 Marketing Management
MGS 630 Operations and Service Management
MGS 641 Strategic Management
MTH 306 Introduction to Differential Equations
MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
MTH 241 College Calculus III
PHY 107 General Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab
Two MBA flex core courses
One engineering science elective; must be chosen from EAS 200, EAS 204, or EAS 209 (if EAS 208 is taken)
Two IE technical electives (selected from the IE department)
Eight M.B.A electives

Summary
Total required credit hours for the undergraduate portion: 113

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Refer to the School of Management's handbook for requirements for MBA candidates.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall—CHE 107, EAS 140, MTH 141
Spring—MTH 142, PHY 107, basic science elective; IE 101 (optional)

SECOND YEAR
Fall—EAS 207, EAS 230, MTH 241, PHY 108, PHY 158
Spring—EAS 208 or EAS 209; IE 320, MTH 306, one engineering science elective

THIRD YEAR
Fall—EAS 305, IE 321, IE 326, IE 373
Spring—IE 306, IE 323, IE 327, IE 374, EAS 495
Summer—Students can lighten their senior course load by taking IE 487 Co-op to partially fulfill the internship requirement.

FOURTH YEAR
Fall—MGA 604, MGB 601, MGE 601; one of the following: IE 408, IE 424, IE 477
Spring— IE 486 (2 credits), IE 491, MGF 631, MGM 625, MGS 630, one IE technical elective, one MBA flex core course
Summer—Students can lighten their course load by taking a technical or MBA elective

FIFTH YEAR
Fall—Two of the following: IE 408, IE 424, IE 477; four MBA electives
Spring—MGS 641, four MBA electives, one IE technical elective

Contact School of Management for flex core course and elective options.

Upon completion of undergraduate program requirements and all management requirements, the combined degree is conferred at the end of the fifth year.



Course Descriptions

IE 101 Discover Industrial Engineering

Credits:  1
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces students to the field of industrial engineering, and the IE department at UB, through a series of real life IE case studies and examples.

 

IE 306 Statistical Methods for Engineering

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  EAS 305
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Introduces the principles and methodologies of statistical inference; methods of data analysis; point and interval estimation; tests of hypotheses; correlation and regression. Introduces analysis of variance methods.


IE 320 Engineering Economy

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces concepts of economic decision making, including present worth analysis, cash-flow equivalence, replacement analysis, equipment selection. Open to students in any discipline.

 

IE 321 Production Systems

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  junior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Lecture and plant-visit course that introduces students to production processes and the role of industrial engineering. Topics include the production process as a human/machine system; planning, organizing, and control in industry.


IE 323 Ergonomics

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  EAS 305
Corequisites:  IE 306
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Focuses on the interactions of humans with tasks, equipment, and the environment as part of the workplace system. Students learn about human capabilities and limitations, applications of human factors/ergonomics principles to system design, methodologies for human-system analysis, and experimental design and data analysis applied to human factors problems.

 

IE 326 Planning for Production

Credits:  4
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  junior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  IE 373
Type:  LEC/REC

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Examines principles central to the planning of a production process. These include topics germane to the planning, scheduling, and control of production. Three lecture periods and one recitation weekly.


IE 327 Facilities Design

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  IE 326
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Basics of design, analysis, and selection of manufacturing facilities and material-handling equipment. Approaches to analyzing manufacturing and material-handling systems. Applications of computers in modern facilities design and material handling, emphasizing material-flow control and storage. Economic justification models for manufacturing and material-handling systems.

 

IE 373 Introduction to Operations Research: Deterministic Models

Credits:  4
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  junior standing in engineering or its equivalent
Corequisites:  IE 326
Type:  LEC/REC

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Introduces methodology of operations research and systems engineering. Concepts of objective functions, theories of value, optimization. Elementary mathematical models of reliability, Markov decision processes, waiting-line models with Poisson arrival and exponential service, game theory, decision analysis.


IE 374 Introduction to Operations Research: Probabilistic Models

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  EAS 305, IE 373
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Continuation of IE 373, introducing uncertainty, risk, and the probabilistic approach in operations research. Topics include elementary mathematical models of game theory, decision analysis, stochastic dynamic programming, stochastic processes (including Markov chains and Markov decision processes) and queues (waiting lines).

 

IE 406 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  IE 321 and permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Basic and important principles in computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM). Based on an understanding of modern production and manufacturing systems, the course further introduces to students the use of computers for the integration of all functional areas in a manufacturing enterprise. Topics include computer-aided design (CAD), geometric models and data structures, computer-aided process planning (CAPP), group technology (GT), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and database applications in manufacturing.


IE 408 Quality Assurance

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  IE 306 or equivalent
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Topics in statistical quality-control systems. Principles involved in designing statistical quality-control systems and sampling acceptance plans. Design and analysis of a wide variety of statistical control systems. Considers the utility of these techniques in the attainment of working control objectives.

 

IE 409 Total Quality Management

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  IE 408
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A set of management principles and methods for dramatically improving the quality of the product(s) produced and ultimately the productivity of the organization. The course focuses on team building and encouraging employee involvement in problem solving. Students are taught how to involve all employees in reducing product variation and eliminating rework and scrap.


IE 412 Decision Analysis

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  EAS 305
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Decision analysis that extends the domain of decision-making problems from those considered in traditional statistical hypothesis testing scenarios: modeling decisions, which emphasize structuring decision problems using techniques such as influence diagrams and decision trees; modeling uncertainty, which covers subjective probability assessment, use of classical probability models, Bayesian analysis, and value of information; and modeling preferences, which introduces concepts of risk preference, expected utility, and multi-attribute value and utility models.

 

IE 424 Experimental Methods

Credits:  4
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  EAS 207, IE 306, IE 323
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Serves as a second course in human factors and ergonomics. Course topics include measurement of the human body, structure and functioning. The course covers both anatomical and physiological mechanisms important to engineers, and emphasizes applications and implications of physiological measures, such as energy expenditures, heart rate, and E.M.G.


IE 435 Human-Computer Interaction

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  senior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Familiarizes students with the principles and practice of use- and user-centered design of human-computer interfaces. By the end of the course, students are able to identify, describe, and implement a subset of methods appropriate for requirements gathering, user and task modeling, prototype development, and user test plan development, implementation, and analysis. Additionally, students are able to apply principles in user-centered design to interface design.

 

IE 436 Work Physiology

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  IE 323, IE 424 or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Introduces structure and functioning of the human body. Examines environmental factors such as temperature, humidity, and biological rhythms; and applications and implications of physiological measures, such as energy expenditures, heart rate, and E.M.G.


IE 441 Human Factors in Safety

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  IE 323, IE 424 or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Overall view of the professional field, particularly emphasizing the role of the human, and human factors, in safe working systems. Provides information relevant to understanding basic concepts associated with systems safety, such as the legislative environment, management culture, and sources of workplace hazards; understanding the need to consider the human when designing safe, complex systems; and analyzing a work system to predict its hazards and select possible interventions.

 

IE 460 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  senior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Studies special areas of interest to students and instructor. Content varies from section to section and semester to semester.


IE 477 Digital Simulation

Credits:  4
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  IE 306, IE 374, and computer programming skills
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Introduces the development of digital simulation models of complex systems.

 

IE 478 Simulation Languages

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  IE 477
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Studies simulation languages for modeling discrete systems. An elective course for IE seniors who will have already had a course in basic simulation modeling.


IE 482 Robotics

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  senior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Analyzes robots and robotic systems: kinematics, coordinate transform, numerical control, off-line programming, robot vision, and simulation of robotic systems.

 

IE 491 Industrial Internship

Credits:  1 \ 4
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  senior standing in Industrial Engineering (all required 300 level IE courses are prerequisites)
Corequisites:  EAS 495, IE 486, IE 487, or IE 488 (2 credits)
Type:  LEC/TUT

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A field experience working on an industrial engineering project in a manufacturing plant, hospital, library, police department, or similar location under the joint direction of a preceptor from industry and a faculty advisor. Projects are selected that integrate the material learned in academic courses. Requires a written report and an oral presentation. Students must also register for 1 credit of EAS 495 (Engineering Career Institute), and 2 credits of IE Co-op (IE 486 - fall, IE 487 - spring, or IE 488 - summer) to fulfill their internship requirement, along with IE 491.


IE 494 Applied Industrial Engineering

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  senior standing in engineering
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Problems encountered working as an industrial engineer. Difficulties in applying theories to the real world. Selling solutions to problems.

  

Updated: Nov 16, 2005 10:49:05 AM

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