Architecture

Department of Architecture

School of Architecture and Planning
112 Hayes Hall
South Campus
Buffalo, NY 14214-3087

Phone: 716.829.3483
Fax: 716.829.3256
Web: www.ap.buffalo.edu/architecture/

Mehrdad Hadighi
Chair

R. J. Multari
Director of Undergraduate Advisement

Debi Smith
Assistant to the Chair

Susan McDonald
Undergraduate Advisement Secretary

About the Program

The Department of Architecture offers the only accredited professional master of architecture (MArch) degree in the State University of New York system, along with an undergraduate preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture (BS Arch), as well as an undergraduate minor. Founded in 1969, the department offers introductory courses for non-majors, as well as undergraduate preprofessional, graduate professional, and advanced postprofessional training in the field of architecture. Additional degree programs include a dual Master of Architecture plus Master of Urban Planning (MArch + MUP), a dual Master of Architecture plus Master of Business Administration (MArch + MBA), and a dual Master of Architecture plus Master of Fine Arts in Media Arts Production (MArch + MFA).

Architecture is the study of designing and building structures, and architects are professionals with specialized knowledge about the design of built and natural environments. The educational mission of the Department of Architecture is fourfold:

1. To educate and train individuals in the art and science of architecture in preparation for creative leadership within the profession and the discipline of architecture;
2. To encourage a critical understanding of the historical, societal, material and cultural forces that inform the built environment;
3. To prepare students to explore emerging ideas and technologies that can and will have profound effects on the built environment; and,
4. To provide a comprehensive education through exposure to related disciplines throughout the university and to encourage rigorous interaction across disciplinary boundaries.

Architecture Program Preparation. Incoming students should prepare themselves in the areas of freehand drawing, manual drafting, figure drawing, sculpting, technical drawing, and 2-D and 3-D design. Graphic techniques, model making, ceramics production, metal working, as well as many other visual skills are taught in the bachelor of science in architecture program, but students who have some earlier preparation may find it easier to succeed in design studio coursework. In addition, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture also recommends introductory courses in art history, urban studies, and world culture for those interested in architecture.

Architects must be able to graphically communicate their ideas visually to their clients; therefore, design and drawing ability is helpful for such communication. More important is a visual orientation and the ability to conceptualize and understand spatial relationships. Good communication skills, the ability to work independently or as part of a team, and creativity are important qualities for anyone interested in becoming an architect.

Many of the building technology courses and design studios required in the Department of Architecture depend upon prior knowledge of physics and calculus, and physics and calculus are prerequisites for the structures/construction courses in architecture. Students may fulfill these prerequisites with successful completion of Advanced Placement high school calculus and Advanced Placement high school physics, or successful completion of introductory college calculus and introductory college physics.

Basic computing skills, including familiarity with personal computers, word processing, and desktop publishing are prerequisites to beginning the sophomore year. Students who are unable to demonstrate the necessary competence may be required to seek remedial help before continuing in the undergraduate program. It is the responsibility of all architecture students to have access to a computer.

Architectural Licensing and Registration. To become a registered architect, an individual is required to sit for a state-licensing architecture exam. The current licensure policy in the State of New York is based, in combination, on the accumulation of credits earned from:

a. Academic education; and,
b. Professional/intern development experience.

All States and the District of Columbia require individuals to be licensed (registered) before they may call themselves architects and contract to provide architectural services. During this time between graduation and becoming licensed, architecture school graduates generally work in the profession as an intern architect under supervision of a licensed architect who takes legal responsibility for all work. Licensing requirements include a professional degree in architecture, a period of practical training or internship, and a passing score on all divisions of the Architect Registration Examination (ARE).

All State architectural registration boards require a professional training period before candidates may sit for the state-licensing architecture exam and become licensed. Most States have adopted the training standards established by the Intern Development Program, a branch of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB). These standards stipulate broad and diversified training under the supervision of a licensed architect over a three- to five-year period. New graduates usually begin as intern architects in architectural firms, where they assist in preparing architectural documents or drawings. Intern architects may research building codes and materials or write specifications for building materials, installation criteria, the quality of finishes, and other, related details. After completing the on-the-job training period, intern architects are eligible to sit for the state-licensing architecture exam. The examination tests candidates' knowledge, skills, and ability to provide the various services required in the design and construction of structures. Licensing evaluations are conducted in New York by the State Education Department's Office of the Professions.

At present, a candidate can sit for the New York State licensing exam with:

1. The accredited first professional degree in architecture (UB's master of architecture) and a minimum of three years of professional intern development experience; or,
2. A preprofessional architecture degree (UB's bachelor of science in architecture) and a minimum of five years of professional intern development experience.

The New York State architect license, in combination with the preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture, will not transfer to most other states. Without the accredited first professional master of architecture degree, an individual may not be permitted to sit for the licensure exam or practice in other states. In addition, the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) requires a professional degree for membership and license reciprocity. A growing number of architects voluntarily seek certification by NCARB, which can facilitate an individual's licensing to practice in additional states. According to 2006 US Department of Labor data, approximately one-third of all licensed architects had NCARB certification. Architects may find it increasingly necessary to gain license reciprocity in order to compete for the best jobs and projects in other States. Certification is awarded after independent verification of the candidate�s educational transcripts, employment record, and professional references. Certification is the primary requirement for reciprocity of licensing among State Boards that are NCARB members. Nationally, the preferred method for licensure is to complete an accredited professional master of architecture degree program. For licensing information related to architecture, visit the New York State Education Department Web site at www.op.nysed.gov/arch.htm. For information on the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), visit www.ncarb.org/. For membership information on the American Institute of Architects (AIA), visit www.aia.org/.

Degree Options

Bachelor of Science in Architecture. The bachelor of science in architecture is a preprofessional baccalaureate degree designed to instill concepts and skills upon which professional architecture studies at the graduate level are based. It allows students to complete all prerequisites for eligibility to enter a two-year accredited professional master of architecture (MArch) degree program. In 1994, the department expanded the undergraduate degree into a four-year, preprofessional undergraduate program. This format provides candidates for the preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture with a liberal exposure to the humanities, technology, the social sciences, and aesthetic expression. The goal is to convey architecture as a field of study and a way of viewing the world. A minimum of 128 semester credit hours is required for the preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture.


Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited professional degree. There are three types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB): the bachelor of architecture (BArch), which typically requires five years of undergraduate academic study; the master of architecture (MArch), which requires a minimum of three years of academic study following an unrelated baccalaureate degree --or-- two years following a related preprofessional baccalaureate architecture degree; and, the doctor of architecture (DArch). These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration/licensure as architects. The University at Buffalo is the only campus in the State University of New York system to offer the accredited professional master of architecture (MArch) degree.

The four-year, preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture, without the accredited first professional master of architecture degree, is not accredited by NAAB. The preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture, as recognized by NAAB, NCARB, and the New York State Education Department, is useful for those who desire a foundation in the field of architecture as preparation for either continued education in an accredited professional master of architecture (MArch) degree program or employment options in architecture-related areas. For additional information on the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), visit www.naab.org/. For further information on the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), visit www.ncarb.org/.

Minor in Architecture. The minor in architecture, a non-studio based track offered by the Department of Architecture, provides students with a liberal exposure to the humanities, technology, social sciences, and aesthetic expression through the lenses of the built and the natural environments. The study of architecture offers an indispensable background for students in most fields of study in that it develops skills in critical thinking and making as well as furnishing tools for interpreting and understanding the ways in which we inhabit and shape the material world. In addition, the minor in architecture is designed to enhance and provide additional knowledge for students interested in pursuing a 3+ year accredited professional Master of Architecture (MArch) degree upon completion of their baccalaureate studies. The minor in architecture is typically completed within five to six semesters.

Acceptance Information

Admissions Statement. The School of Architecture and Planning has an admission policy that actively encourages applicants from protected groups and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or veteran status. Admission is competitive, and applicants are reviewed according to the admission criteria. Acceptance of students in the preprofessional, professional, and postprofessional programs is determined on the basis of the applicants' qualifications and experience. However, since the school's size is limited, the programs may exercise discretionary powers of selection. Courses and programs offered by the School of Architecture and Planning may include an instructional technology fee. Contact the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement or visit http://wings.buffalo.edu/ap/advising for additional information on undergraduate admission.

Bachelor of Science in Architecture
Freshmen Admission. For students with no previous postsecondary education experience, the Department of Architecture uses the same requirements for departmental admission at the freshman level as the university uses; that is, high school average, completed high school courses, rank in high school class, and standardized exam scores (SAT/ACT). Portfolios are not required for the initial freshmen application process; however, portfolios and academic letters of recommendation may be requested at a later time as part of the undergraduate admissions procedure. First-time freshman applicants are notified of the departmental decision at the same time that they are notified of the university's admission decision. Minimum SAT, ACT, and TOEFL scores are required for studio enrollment. The preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture is a fall-only admission program. Contact the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement for additional admission and advisement information.

Transfer Admission. Transfer students must first apply to the University at Buffalo by February 15 and meet its transfer admission requirements. Department of Architecture transfer admission application forms and portfolio requirement information (if appropriate) are mailed or downloaded once the undergraduate transfer admission application is received by the University at Buffalo. Transfer students should consult directly with the Department of Architecture to determine architecture application deadlines, academic admission criteria, and recommended preparatory courses. Applications from undergraduate transfer students received after February 28 will be reviewed on a space-only available basis until May 31 as guided by the School of Architecture and Planning�s admission statement. No additional transfer application material will be reviewed after May 31. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in architecture and architecture-related courses and a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 is required for admission consideration. Minimum TOEFL scores are required for studio enrollment. The preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture is a fall-only admission program. Contact the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement for additional admission and advisement information.

Minor in Architecture.
Students choosing a minor in architecture must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 and must have completed two of the lower-division (100/200-level) courses with a minimum GPA of 2.5. Upon admission to the minor in architecture, students are assigned faculty mentors based upon their interests. These faculty mentors help students develop specific plans of study. Students are required to discuss development of their minor through conferences with their faculty mentors at least once per semester. Contact the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement for additional admission and advisement information.

Advisement

All students in the Department of Architecture are assigned faculty mentors upon admission to the program. In addition, the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement is available for assistance. Students are encouraged to consult regularly with their faculty mentors in matters pertaining to academic options, course selection, postbaccalaureate studies, and career opportunities. Students meet with advisors and faculty mentors as often as they choose to explore educational opportunities available within the School of Architecture and Planning and the University at Buffalo, and to plan a course of study that is consistent with their abilities, achievements, interests, and expectations. The ultimate goal of advisement is to empower students to use the tools and resources available to become active and responsible learners. Visit http://wings.buffalo.edu/ap/advising/ for additional information on undergraduate advisement.

Academic Requirements

Students are reviewed on their progress in the undergraduate preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture by the Department of Architecture on an annual basis. This review determines the student's eligibility to continue onto the next level in the undergraduate preprofessional architecture program. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in required architecture curricular courses is compulsory for academic degree requirements.


Transfer Policy

Courses completed at other colleges and universities are not automatically accepted by the Department of Architecture as fulfilling departmental requirements. While select architecture courses taken elsewhere may be accepted, determination is made by an evaluation of the student's transcripts, course content, contact hours, and grades earned. A minimum course grade of B- (2.67 on a 4.0 scale) is required for articulation to courses offered by the School of Architecture and Planning. Student transcript evaluations are conducted by the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement. Placement in the undergraduate preprofessional architecture program is made by the department following this evaluation, in tandem with portfolio review, when applicable. Visit http://wings.buffalo.edu/ap for further information on transfer policies and procedures. A minimum GPA of 2.5 in architecture and architecture-related courses and a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 is required for admission consideration.

Honors, Awards, and Scholarships

Matthew W. Del Gaudio Award. The New York Society of Architects presents this award to a graduating student who has demonstrated 'Total Design' excellence, defined by: 'an imaginative solution of an architectural problem that is functionally ideal, structurally feasible, suitably sited, and employing available materials in a practical and aesthetically sound manner.'

Henry Adams Medal. The AIA awards an engraved medal and certificate of merit to the top-ranking graduating student in each architecture program accredited by NAAB. A certificate of merit is awarded to the second-ranking student.

R. Buckminster Fuller Award. The Friends of the School of Architecture and Planning present this award to a graduating bachelor of science in architecture student accepted into the UB master of architecture program. The recipient must be returning to the University at Buffalo for graduate study in architecture to receive this award. The student must show innovation and inventiveness in design.

Design Excellence Award. Awarded to students with outstanding studio work.

Academic Achievement Award. Awarded to students with the highest overall GPA.

ARC/King Student Medal for Excellence in Architectural + Environmental Design Research. This award is given to one student based on criteria that acknowledges innovation, integrity, and scholarship in architecture and/or environmental research.

Departmental Honors. Awarded to graduating undergraduate architecture students who achieve a high level of academic excellence and creativity within the Department of Architecture.

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research and Practical Experience

Study Abroad. Traveling can enhance architecture students' awareness of the world, bringing them closer to understanding global diversity and appreciating what is universal and unique to a culture. Undergraduate students can participate in four in-house study abroad programs offered by the Department of Architecture:

Aarhus, Denmark. The University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, and the School of Architecture (Arkitektskolen i Aarhus) in Aarhus, Denmark, have a formal agreement outlining an exchange program for students and faculty. Students may attend classes and studio for one semester or one year abroad in Aarhus while continuing to pay tuition at UB. Aarhus provides housing at no cost to visiting UB students. Individual courses of study are developed by faculty advisors at both institutions. Students participate in the daily activities of one of the ongoing studios in Aarhus. Up to four full-time exchange positions are open each year (eight semester slots). Fluency in Danish is not required.

Antwerp, Belgium. This is an exchange program between the Department of Architecture at UB and the Henry Van de Velde Instituut in Antwerp, Belgium. Selected students spend between one semester and one year studying in Belgium, with an equal number of students attending here at UB. Intensive lessons in Dutch are provided.

Darmstadt, Germany. This official exchange program between the University at Buffalo and the Technische - Hochschule at the University of Darmstadt, Germany, provides opportunities for advanced undergraduate students to continue their studies through coursework, tutorials, supervised independent study, or research though affiliation with an academic program in Darmstadt. Students may apply for one semester (fall or spring) or the full academic year. Darmstadt will provide partially subsidized living accommodations in a university residence hall. Fluency in German is required.

Monteverde, Costa Rica. This eight-week summer course of study offers students the opportunity to live and work on ecological and social projects in a rural, but rapidly developing, region in Costa Rica. This is a multidisciplinary program designed for students from various disciplines, including architecture, planning, landscape architecture, resource management, and international development. Students participate in a seminar on sustainable development, enroll in Spanish language classes, and take an intensive 6-credit studio/internship with one of the many organizations in the Monteverde zone working toward sustainability. There is a final report, plans or a design scheme, or actual environment intervention, depending on the nature of the work. In addition, there is a series of lectures and field trips to local cooperatives, ecologically managed farms, and various forest reserves. This is a semester's worth of credits (12) in a small rural community next to the Monteverde Cloud Forest Preserve in Costa Rica. Students work with community residents on various jointly defined projects . The program is sponsored jointly by the UB School of Architecture and Planning and the University of Maryland Department of Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture. Fluency in Spanish is encouraged but not required.

Other in-house study abroad programs, including Ireland, Italy, and Japan, may be offered on an ad-hoc basis by the Department of Architecture based upon faculty and student interest.

Research Centers:
As a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities (AAU), the University at Buffalo considers advanced research integral and fundamental to its mission. Consequently, the School of Architecture and Planning faculty are actively involved in the creation of new knowledge through sponsored research, creative design work, and text-based scholarship. This research activity is intertwined with the departmental curricula, allowing students to take full advantage of the faculty's expertise. The Department of Architecture is affiliated with the following centers that afford students opportunities for applied research activities:

The Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/idea/) is dedicated to improving the design of environments and products by making them more usable, safe, and appealing to people with a wide range of abilities through their life spans. The center is active in basic and applied research, design development, community service, and education. Current programs focus on home modifications, functional assessment, and universal design.

The Center for the Study of Space is an interdisciplinary research center established by the Department of Architecture and the Department of Comparative Literature. Its focus is the study of space as it is understood within the textual and the theoretical disciplines and the physical and tectonic disciplines.

The Center for Virtual Architecture (http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/cva/) is dedicated to the examination of new technologies and their relation to the study of architecture. This intention is pursued through analytical, historical, theoretical, and design research methodologies.

The Urban Design Project (http://urbandesignproject.ap.buffalo.edu/) is a university center devoted to research, teaching and scholarship in the pursuit of a critical practice of urban design. Founded in 1990, it focuses on issues of community development and urban revitalization while fostering the intellectual exploration of architecture and planning. From 1994 through 1999, the project led the five-year public visioning process for downtown Buffalo and all its council districts. The project also oversaw the master planning and conceptual design development for the facilities supporting the Bosque Eterno de los Ni�os and the Instituto de Monteverde in Costa Rica. More recently, it has led the effort to develop the City of Buffalo's Downtown Strategic Plan. The work of the Urban Design Project has encompassed faculty consultations, student internships, studio projects, and supervised thesis investigations dealing with New York sites that range from Niagara Falls to Buffalo to Jamestown and engaging such institutional partners as Buffalo Place, the City of Buffalo, the Waterfront Regeneration Trust, the City of Niagara Falls, and the Chautauqua County government, as well as several regional and national architectural and planning firms.

Notable Program Features


Facilities
The Architecture and Planning Library (http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/units/apl/), located in Hayes Hall, is one of ten libraries within the University at Buffalo. In addition to its book and journal collections, the Architecture and Planning Library collection includes student theses, maps and plans, a vertical file, a collection of CD-ROMs, census materials, and computer-aided design work.

The Computing Resource Laboratories (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/crl-overview.asp)comprise two sets of facilities: a central collection of laboratories and computing classrooms, and a collection of distributed facilities located in the graduate and undergraduate architecture and planning studios. A wide variety of software packages is provided to support the specific needs of architecture and planning students. Input and output resources include a variety of specialized devices, including color scanners, a large-format scanner, a slide scanner, a film recorder, several digital cameras, CD-R/CS-RW writers, and large- and small-format digitizers. Hard-copy output is provided through laser printers, color printers, and a large-format color postscript plotter.

The design studios and workshops (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/studios.asp), located within the School of Architecture and Planning, have more than 63,000 net square feet of studio and studio support space, including four critique rooms, wet cells for plaster and paint work, a full-service plotting and printing facility, and a total of five educational technology classrooms, including a newly renovated 115-seat educational technology lecture hall. Digital technology is distributed throughout the studios located in Crosby and Hayes Halls, reflecting our belief that digital media should be seamlessly integrated with the making and representation of architecture and urban planning. Studio spaces are networked and outfitted with multiple high-end computers supporting a wide range of CAD, GIS, and graphic software programs.

The Dyett Exhibition Hall (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/dyett.asp) is an exhibition space created as a place to display student and faculty work, as well as to feature national and international traveling exhibits.

The Materials and Methods Shop (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/shop.asp), a machine and assembly space, is available for schoolwide projects and independent work. This complete machine and assembly shop, one of the finest in any U.S. architecture and planning school, contains 7,000 square feet of high-bay space and is supplied with full woodworking capabilities, welding and milling equipment, lathes, sheet-metal machines, a vacuum-forming machine for molding plastic, and a variety of hand tools.

The Visual Resources Center (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/vrc.asp) is a joint School of Architecture and Planning and University Libraries facility. It directly supports the curriculum with its ever-growing collection of 31,500 slides, 250 videotapes, and audiovisual equipment. It is linked to the university's other collections through the University Libraries' online computerized index service.

Publications
Intersight (www.ap.buffalo.edu/intersight/) is a schoolwide, student-edited scholarly journal published biennially. The founders of the journal set out to create a participatory forum for distinguished colleagues, faculty, graduates, and students to express their views and ideas about architecture and planning. The mission of Intersight is to publish writing, research, and design work that articulates a speculative, theoretical, or pedagogical position, and reflects the intellectual life of the School of Architecture and Planning.

Career Opportunities/Further Study

Opportunities open to students graduating with a preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture degree (not requiring state architecture licensure) include facilities management, building design, construction management, and computer-aided design. Students have also obtained positions with public agencies and development firms, and have worked as paraprofessionals with both small and large architectural offices.

Because architecture education encompasses technology, the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences, there are many opportunities in both the public and private sectors for architecture students. Many graduates are employed in community design and planning firms, building and construction firms, community development corporations, and building products manufacturers. Alternative career opportunities include architectural preservation, landscape architecture, facilities planning, interior design, industrial design, environmental design, graphic design, real estate development, and engineering technology. While many of these alternatives do not require architectural licensure, some may require additional training or certification.

Most students completing the accredited first professional master of architecture degree become licensed architects who practice in architectural firms, public/governmental agencies or corporations. Common practice roles within an architectural team include design, construction management, facilities planning, site planning and design, structural design, technical research and specifications, document production, contract administration, urban planning and design, interior design, and practice management.

Architecture - B.S.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.5 overall.
Minimum GPA of 2.5 in architecture and architecture-related courses.

Advising Notes

A minimum architecture and architecture-related GPA of 2.5 and a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 are required for admission consideration.

Transfer students must complete a departmental application (available by contacting the Department of Architecture or the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement) in addition to the university's transfer application. Transfer admission applications received after February 28 will be reviewed on a space-only available basis until May 31, as guided by the School of Architecture and Planning�s admission statement. No additional transfer application material will be reviewed after May 31.

Architecture design studios (ARC 101-ARC 102, ARC 201-ARC 202, ARC 301-ARC 302, ARC 403-ARC 404, ARC 406) are majors-only design studios. Concurrent enrollment in multiple design studios is prohibited.

Students are reviewed on their progress in the preprofessional bachelor of science in architecture by the Department of Architecture on an annual basis. This review determines the student's eligibility to continue onto the next level in the undergraduate preprofessional program.

A minimum of 42 ARC-prefixed credit hours must be completed at the University at Buffalo to satisfy the Department of Architecture's bachelor of science in architecture residency requirement, and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in major courses is required to graduate with the bachelor of science in architecture.

Intended and admitted architecture majors and minors should go directly to the Department of Architecture, 112 Hayes Hall, for advisement.

Required Courses

ARC 101 Design Studio I
ARC 102 Design Studio II
ARC 121 Introduction to Architecture
ARC 122 Environment, Behavior, and Design
ARC 201 Design Studio III
ARC 202 Design Studio IV
ARC 231 Architecture History I: Ancient - 1450
ARC 234 Architecture History II: 1450 - Present
ARC 241 Introduction to Building Technology
ARC 301 Design Studio V
ARC 302 Design Studio VI
ARC 352 Structures I
ARC 362 Performance Programming
ARC 403 Design Studio VII
ARC 404 Design Studio VIII
ARC 411 Introduction to CAAD
ARC 442 Construction Technology
ARC 453 Structures II
ARC 473 Environmental Controls I
MTH 121 Survey of Calculus and Its Applications I
PHY 101 College Physics I*
Minimum of 6 credits of ARC electives
Minimum of 15 credits of non-ARC electives

Summary
Total required credit hour for the major: 98

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall ARC 101, ARC 121, MTH 121,
Spring ARC 102, ARC 122, PHY 101*

SECOND YEAR
Fall ARC 201, ARC 231, ARC 241
Spring ARC 202, ARC 234, ARC 352

THIRD YEAR
Fall ARC 301, ARC 411, ARC 453
Spring ARC 302, ARC 442, ARC 473

FOURTH YEAR
Note: The fourth year spring semester is the best possible time for architecture study abroad opportunities.

Fall ARC 403, ARC 362, one ARC elective
Spring ARC 404, one ARC elective

*PHY 151 is optional for architecture students needing PHY 101, as approved by the Department of Architecture and the Department of Physics.

Electives and Course Groupings

The following is a sample, but not all-inclusive, list of possible electives offered by the Department of Architecture:

ARC 211 Diversity and Design
ARC 318 Design Methods
ARC 322 Introduction To Building Reuse
ARC 326 Building Types
ARC 328 Historic Preservation
ARC 343 Building Systems Technology I
ARC 344 Building Systems Technology II
ARC 354 Experimental Structures
ARC 357 Fabric Structures
ARC 419 Contemporary Theory
ARC 412 CAAD 2: Models, Objects, & Environment
ARC 440 Computer Applications
ARC 448 Building Projects
ARC 449 Architectural Materials
ARC 455 Structures III
ARC 464 Behavior and Space
ARC 465 Urban Planning and Design I
ARC 467 Research Practice
ARC 470 Climate and Architecture
ARC 472 Energy and Shelter
ARC 475 Environmental Controls II
ARC 476 Landscape Design
ARC 479 Sustainable Design
ARC 481 Cost Control and Analysis
ARC 482 Professional Practice
ARC 488 Special Topics: Seminar in Design Theory
ARC 496 Community Design Service
ARC 499 Independent Study

Architecture - Minor

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Minimum GPA of 2.5 in prerequisite courses.

Advising Notes

All students must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours and three courses in the lower division and a minimum of 12 credit hours and four courses in the upper division. Students devise a plan of study in consultation with their faculty mentors.

Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.0 overall and a minimum GPA of 2.5 in minor courses for successful completion of the minor in architecture.

No more than 3 credits of ARC 467 (Research Practice), 3 credits of ARC 496 (Community Design Service), and 3 credits of ARC 499 (Independent Study) may be applied toward minor requirements.

No more than two non-ARC prefixed courses may be used for the minor in architecture, and no more than six credits of architecture transfer coursework may be applied toward minor requirements.

Other relevant courses (such as Special Topics courses) from the undergraduate curriculum in architecture may be approved for the minor, with qualified special permission, from the course instructor and the School of Architecture and Planning�s Office of Undergraduate Advisement.

The Department of Architecture guarantees that some of these courses will be offered within a six semester period so students can complete their minor in a timely manner. Select courses approved for the minor in architecture may only be offered on an intermittent basis.

For undergraduate information, or for an admission application to the minor in architecture, contact the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement.

Prerequisite Courses

Two 100/200-level architecture courses.

Required Courses

LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
ARC 121 Introduction to Architecture
ARC 122 Environment, Behavior, and Design
ARC 211 Diversity and Design
ARC 231 Architecture History I: Ancient - 1450
ARC 234 Architecture History II: 1450 - Present
ARC 241 Introduction to Building Technology (Suggested)

UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
ARC 322 Introduction to Building Reuse
ARC 328 Historic Preservation
ARC 343 Building Systems Technology I
ARC 344 Building Systems Technology II
ARC 352 Structures I
ARC 354 Experimental Structures
ARC 357 Fabric Structures
ARC 362 Performance Programming
ARC 419 Contemporary Theory
ARC 435 American Houses and Housing
ARC 448 Building Projects
ARC 453 Structures II
ARC 455 Structures III
ARC 464 Behavior and Space
ARC 467 Research Practice
ARC 470 Climate and Architecture
ARC 473 Environmental Controls I
ARC 476 Landscape Design
ARC 479 Sustainable Design
ARC 481 Cost Control and Analysis
ARC 482 Professional Practice
ARC 496 Community Design Service
ARC 499 Independent Study
PD 312 Design of Cities
PD 407 Site Planning and Design

Total minimum required credit hours: 21

Course Descriptions

AP 100 College Physics

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  MTH 121
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Cross-listed with PHY 101 College Physics. Students must complete MTH 121 Survey of Calculus I prior to enrollment in AP 100. Open to School of Architecture and Planning students only.

AP 496 Architecture and Urban Planning Internship

Credits:  1 - 6
Semester: F Sp Su
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A university elective. Allows students to gain exposure and experience with a host agency as well as increase their understanding in particular areas of architecture, enviornmental design, and urban planning. Advanced permission, agreement with the host agency, and a required final written report must be approved by the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement.

AP 499 Independent Study

Credits:  1
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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Designed to add depth and breadth to a student's understanding of architecture or environmental design and urban planning. Students electing this course must be accepted for work on a specific topic by a member of the School of Architecture and Planning�s faculty, and must have the approval of the School of Architecture and Planning�s Office of Undergraduate Advisement.

ARC 101 Architectural Design Studio 1

Credits:  6
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB/LEC

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A majors-only studio course; theme is space plus geometry, graphic communications, and visual representation. Introduces two-dimensional and three-dimensional representation techniques for developing and presenting design concepts. Develops creative thinking and critical awareness in design. Cognitive understanding for spatial relationships present in structural, proportional, and site systems are introduced, combining geometry and graphics. Freehand drawings, 2-D and 3-D projections, shades, shadows, perspective, and reproduction techniques. Development of model-making skills utilizing various design methodologies. Studio projects introduce a range of assignments for the making of both 2-D and 3-D environments. Introduction to drawing and making as a mode of seeing and thinking.

ARC 102 Architectural Design Studio 2

Credits:  6
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only studio course; theme is theme is process plus materiality, graphic communications, and visual representation. Provides a working forum for developing creative thinking and critical awareness in design. Further examines two-dimensional and three-dimensional representation techniques for developing and presenting design concepts. Cognition for spatial relationships present in structural, proportional, and site systems are aquired via freehand drawings, 2-D and 3-D projections, shades, shadows, perspective, and design techniques. Further development of model-making skills utilizing various design methodologies. Studio projects introduce a range of assignments for the making of both 2-D and 3-D environments. Continued introduction of drawing and making as a mode of seeing and thinking.

ARC 121 Introduction to Architecture 1

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An introductory course and approved arts general education course. Provides a view and understanding of the profession and the discipline of architecture. Introduces architectural education and practice in the United States. Architecture responds to the past, embodied in the stones of the built environment, and is a fundamental aspect of the present. Connects architecture history and theory in an effort to show why architecture has been called 'the handwriting of humankind.' Examines architecture as a way of viewing the constructed world in the context of a liberal arts education as a study of aesthetic, technological, behavioral, social, environmental, and legal forces determining architectural forms and urban patterns. Open to non-majors.

ARC 122 Environment, Behavior, and Design

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An introductory course. Examines contemporary perspectives on environmental psychology, focusing on the relationships between human behavior and designed environments, and explores implications of those relationships for the purpose, nature, and future direction of design education, design research, and design practice. Open to non-majors.

ARC 201 Architectural Design Studio 3

Credits:  6
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ARC 101, ARC 102
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only studio course. Emphasizes conceptualization, critical thinking, planning, and making. Analyzes the basic materials, methods, tools, and conventions of architectural design. Examines the connections between abstract design principles and the physical and visual environments. Project themes include transformation, connection, threshold, movement/storage, surface/structure, accessibility, and transition.

ARC 202 Architectural Design Studio 4

Credits:  6
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 101, ARC 102
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only studio course. Emphasizes conceptualization, critical thinking, planning, and making. Analyzes the basic materials, methods, tools, and conventions of architectural design. Examines the connections between abstract design principles and the physical and visual environments. Project themes include transformation, connection, threshold, movement/storage, surface/structure, accessibility, and transition.

ARC 211 American Diversity and Design

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An introductory course and approved American Pluralism general education course. Examines the relationship of design to the changing nature of American society, examining the rich diversity of cultural experiences and its attendant environmental issues. Concentrates on ways physical and media environments affect various populations in the U.S., and ways these populations affect designed environments. Introduces students to eight issues of diversity: race, ethnicity, gender, class, age, physical ability/disability, mental ability/disability, and religion. Analyzes American physical and media environments in terms of equitable use, flexibility in use, simple and intuitive use, perceptible information, tolerance for error, low physical effort, and size and space for approach and use. Open to non-majors.

ARC 231 Architecture History I: Ancient - 1450

Credits:  4
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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A history/theory course; prehistory to renaissance. Introduces the development of urban and architectural form in a cultural context from the first settlements of Neolithic times to the consolidation of architecture as a discipline in the 1450s. Open to non-majors.

ARC 234 Architecture History II: 1450- Present

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 231
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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A history/theory course; renaissance to modern. Introduces the fundamentals of architectural design from the theory and practice of the 1450's to the built and written manifestos of modern times. Situates the evolution of the architectural discipline within the context of social, cognitive and technological transformation. Open to non-majors.

ARC 241 Introduction to Building Technology

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  MTH 121 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A structures/construction course. Overview of integrated building systems exploring the interrelationships of construction technology, structures, and environmental controls systems, as they relate to building design.

ARC 301 Architectural Design Studio 5

Credits:  6
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ARC 201, ARC 202
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only studio course; theme is type and typology. Synthesizes design fundamentals with comprehensive architectural design. Uses the theme of type and transformation to convert various aspects of architectural design-form, spatiality, materiality, structure, construction, use, context, aesthetics, zoning, codes, and cultural conditions.

ARC 302 Architectural Design Studio 6

Credits:  6
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 301
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only studio course; theme is type and typology. Synthesizes design fundamentals with comprehensive architectural design. Uses the theme of type and transformation to convert various aspects of architectural design-form, spatiality, materiality, structure, construction, use, context, aesthetics, zoning, codes, and cultural conditions.

ARC 311 Architectural Communications I

Credits:  4
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB/REC

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A major only technics course. Two-D and three-D representation techniques for developing and presenting design concepts. Freehand drawings, 2-D and 3-D projections, shades, shadows, perspective, and reproduction techniques. Utilizes various media.

ARC 312 Architectural Communications II

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 311 and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors only technics course. Three-dimensional drawings as tools for design development and presentation. Development of model-making skills.

ARC 318 Design Methods

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 311 and architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A majors-only technics course. Topics vary annually. Past topics addressed issues in architecture, design, and production, using drawing and making as a mode of seeing and thinking.

ARC 322 Introduction to Building Reuse

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A history/theory course; topics vary annually. Past topics examined case studies of past uses, present conditions, and future functional and structural possibilities of older buildings. Analyzes opportunities for adaptive reuse. Discusses development of design concepts and space-use programs, including renovation, restoration, and reconditioning, as well as preservation.

ARC 326 Building Types

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 352 and architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A majors-only technics course; topics vary annually. Past topics examined prototypical forms and organizations of important building types; developed understanding of sources for design decisions., and investigated various building structural systems. Studied braced frames, rigid frames, shear walled systems, tubes and bundled tubes. Reviewed innovations in digital technology and simulation programs, and their impact on the efficient integration of building systems.

ARC 328 Historic Preservation

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 121 or ARC 234, and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A history/theory course. Historic preservation theory as related to architectural design, emphasizing preservation practice, including tools of effective preservation, legislation, community roles, economics, adaptive reuse, and project management.

ARC 343 Building Systems Technology I

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:   ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A landscape/environment course, topics vary annually. Past topics detailed studies of existing systems available to meet needs of the built environment. Studied future possibilities of systems that meet the demands of a rapidly changing environment. Surveyed historical evolution of building systems, while emphasizing methodology of development and implementation.

ARC 344 Building Systems Technology II

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 343 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A landscape/environment course, topics vary annually. Past topics investigated current building practices, especially those of practitioners in the northern US and Canada. Examined building system research, first hand case study investigation, materials exploration, system prototyping, planning and design, project administration, and construction.

ARC 352 Structures I

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 241, PHY 101, and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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A structures/construction course. Introduces the fundamentals of statics and strength of materials. Provides a theoretical and scientific basis for understanding how various structural systems and structural materials work and withstand loading. Investigates the concepts introduced during the course with qualitative methods, as well as quantitative analysis. The course's scope is limited to examining simple structural elements, such as trusses, beams, and columns.

ARC 354 Experimental Structures

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 352 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A technics course; topics vary annually. Past topics included dimensional analysis, intersections of urban structure and metropolitan infrastructures, models, design prototypes, systems of forces and mass, structural materials, and contemporary theories. Reviewed experimental elements within three-dimensional structural systems for constructed environments. Discussed physical and immaterial structure, and studied stability of structural system elements within urban and built environments.

ARC 357 Fabric Structures

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 352 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A structures/construction course; topics vary annually. Past topics reviewed theory and practice of building with stressed fabric membranes, and explored principles of cable structures, nets, tension membranes, and air-supported and inflated membranes. Also examined minimal surfaces, curved surfaces, materials, joints, and details along with design development, production, erection, and performance in use.

ARC 362 Performance Programming

Credits:  2
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A society/culture course. Overview of architectural programming process and approaches. Examines the performance concept applied to building design, using human factors as a basis for developing building programs. Introduces research methods used in pre-design activities.

ARC 403 Architectural Design Studio 7

Credits:  6
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ARC 301, ARC 302
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only studio course; theme is sustainable and comprehensive design. Uses comprehensive architectural projects to address the complexity of the discipline�site conditions, construction technology, programming, safety and accessibility, codes and standards, and representation. Examines the values and ideologies architects bring forward in their work.

ARC 404 Architectural Design Studio 8

Credits:  6
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 403
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only studio course; theme is advanced topics in architecture and design. Uses comprehensive architectural projects to address the complexity of the discipline -- site conditions, construction technology, programming, safety and accessibility, codes and standards, and representation. Examines the values and ideologies that architects bring forward in their work.

ARC 406 Architectural Design Studio Abroad

Credits:  6
Semester: Sp Su
Prerequisites:  ARC 301, ARC 302
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A majors-only studio course; locations vary annually. In the past, undergraduate students have participated in architecture design studios taught in Belgium, Costa Rica, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Japan, and other international locations as organized by the Department of Architecture. Other in-house study abroad programs will be offered on an ad-hoc basis by the Department of Architecture, based upon faculty and student interest.

ARC 411 CAAD 1: Introduction to CAAD

Credits:  4
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  junior/senior standing and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB/LEC

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A technics course. Introduces students to fundamental theoretical concepts and current research themes in computing and design, as well as their practical application in electronic publishing, drafting, modeling, and design.

ARC 412 CAAD 2: Models, Objects, & Environment

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 411, junior/senior standing, and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB/LEC

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A technics course. Introduces advanced concepts and current research trends in computer-aided design, rendering, animation, and advanced virtual-reality Web publishing. Addresses ways in which advanced computer techniques can be used in support of architectural design and presentation.

ARC 419 Contemporary Theory

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 234 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A history/theory course. Examines trends in design, contemporary theory, and criticism in art and architecture.

ARC 426 Color Culture Theory

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 211, architecture major, and permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A society/culture course. Examines recent approaches to the study of color in relation to space, surface, and representation through the lenses of expanding and overlapping practices. Students study color in painting, literature, film, consumer media, installation and architecture to develop an understanding of its cultural impact.

ARC 435 American Houses and Housing

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 234 and architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A history/theory course; topics vary annually. Past topics examined American residential forms, including the private residence, apartments and tenements, workers' housing, and utopian schemes; with European examples for comparison.

ARC 439 Computer Modeling

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 411junior/senior standing, and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB/LEC

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A technics course; topics vary annually. Past topics examined theoretical and practical approaches of computing technologies in the design process through CAAD systems, drafting, graphic modeling, and rendering, with particular emphasis on architecture.

ARC 440 Computer Applications

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 411, junior/senior standing, and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A technics course; topics vary annually. Past topics introduced students to theoretical computing applications used for design, including theory of design evaluation, prediction, and generation. Investigated emerging techniques related to computer assisted design environments. Explored computing relational geometries in spatial and constructional systems.

ARC 442 Construction Technology

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 241, ARC 411, and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB/LEC

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A structures/construction course. Emphasizes details of construction. Examines interfaces of materials and systems: foundation/wall, wall/window, wall/roof, floor/wall, etc. Investigates the effect of materials and processes on appearance and life of building components. Studies interior and exterior finishes, joints, fire protection, and specification.

ARC 448 Building Projects

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A structures/construction course; topics vary annually. Past topics examined building projects as a complex system of enterprises producing built facilities and altering environments. Included �Oeld trips, hands-on steel fabrication and erection, concrete demolition, concrete pours, pattern making, painting, landscaping, stone setting, as well as shop drawings.

ARC 449 Architectural Materials

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 202 and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A technics course; topics vary annually. In the past, observed and quantitatively and/or qualitatively predicted the behavior of materials: metals, polymers, ceramics, glass, wood, composites, paints, and preservatives. Explored and challenged the properties, social context, and methods of fabrication for the most common materials found in architecture.

ARC 453 Structures 2

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ARC 241, ARC 352, and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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A structures/construction course. Concentrates on the study and investigation of various structural materials, connections and details. Students study various design criteria for specific materials, such as timber, steel, and concrete, and are introduced to the proper use of various building codes in the structural design process.

ARC 455 Structures 3

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ARC 453 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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A structures/construction course. Begins by emphasizing the investigation of reinforced concrete structures and continues by studying various types of foundation systems, such as footings, and retaining and bearing walls. Also includes a general overview of indeterminate structures and the behavior of continuous beams. Concludes with the study of lateral forces and dynamic loading, and their impact on the design of seismic and wind-resistant structures.

ARC 456 Structures 4

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 455 and architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A structures/construction course; topics vary annually. Past topics examined systems in large and/or tall structures affecting decisions of architecture in relation to lightweight systems, physical constraints of the materials, manufacture of the material, and geometry in the material distribution. Reviewed stability considerations of structural systems and individual elements, as well as reserve strength and redundancy concepts.

ARC 463 Design for the Life Span

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major and permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A society/culture course. Overview of major goals and approaches for design and planning for life-span needs, with special attention to older and disabled individuals. Students pursue selected research projects or work together on a class project.

ARC 464 Behavior and Space

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major/minor and permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A society/culture course; topics vary annually. Role of social and cultural theory in understanding design and spatial environments. Impact of buildings and designed environments on human behavior, and behavioral issues within the design process. Effects of social and cultural factors on development, implementation, and use of research information in design. Explores contributions architects, urban planners, and landscape architects make to the design discourse.

ARC 465 Urban Planning and Design 1

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An urban design course. Explores the current practice of urban design in the context of the United States. Examines new opportunities and constraints in environmental assessment, and management structure in local government; mechanisms for land-use controls or incentives; public investment strategy; and case studies assessing major development strategies used in today's practice.

ARC 467 Research Practice

Credits:  1
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major/minor and permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A society/culture course; topics vary annually. Involves analysis and development of real problems accepted from various sponsors. The student's specific contribution to the research results must be documented and filed with the department and sponsor.

ARC 470 Climate and Architecture

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A landscape/environment course. Introduces issues, awareness, and understanding of climate as a determinant of urban design, site design, site/building interface, and building. Studies global scale climatic zones to general/regional zones.

ARC 472 Energy and Shelter

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 241, ARC 473, and architecture major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A landscape/environment course. Investigates current techniques and strategies centered around climate-responsive, energy-conscious design. Emphasizes manual, handbook, and computer techniques to determine comfort conditions and performance of small, passively heated, cooled, daylit buildings. Provides usable information applicable to various stages of the design process.

ARC 473 Environmental Controls 1

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A landscape/environment course. Active systems of climate control in buildings and their relation to energy management. Evaluation and selection of mechanical equipment systems, their cost implications, and effectiveness. Design considerations in integrating various systems. Introduces sanitation, fire protection, and vertical transportation systems.

ARC 475 Environmental Controls 2

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A landscape/environment course. Acoustics and lighting impact on building design, including form, structure, and material. Qualitative and quantitative issues in the lighting of space, integration of natural and artificial light, fundamental nature of sound transmission and absorption, and principles of design for an effective acoustic environment.

ARC 476 Landscape Design

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A landscape/environment course. Introduces the discipline and criteria of landscape design. The art of site planning, including analysis in relation to physical factors, such as topography, soil structure, climate, and behavior. The ecological basis for site planning and use of vegetation.

ARC 479 Sustainable Design

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 121 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A landscape/environment course. Offers a working understanding of the issues inherent in the discourse of sustainability as it occurs in planning and design professions. Students explore the practical and theoretical relationships among urban form, democratic ideals, and ecological imaginations.

ARC 481 Cost Analysis and Control

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A management/finance course; topics vary annually. Past topics examined the financial framework within which the building industry operates, and its impact on design decisions. Course developed analytical skills necessary to evaluate financial and economic viability of project proposals. Taught estimation of project development and operating costs, methods of finance, and market forces as components of feasibility studies.

ARC 482 Professional Practice

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ARC 241 and architecture major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A management/finance course. Phases of management involving architects from project inception to its realization. Office organization, contractor and owner management of projects, construction-cost analysis, organization and preparation of construction documents, review of related legal papers and standardized forms, alternative patterns of construction management relations. Emerging patterns of architectural practice.

ARC 488 Special Topics: Seminar in Design Theory

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A history/theory course; topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed issues in architecture and design theory.

ARC 489 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed issues in architecture and design.

ARC 490 Special Topics

Credits:  2 - 7
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/TUT

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Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed issues in architecture and design.

ARC 492 Special Topics

Credits:  1 - 7
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/TUT

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Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed issues in architecture and design.

ARC 493 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed issues in architecture history and design.

ARC 496 Community Design Service

Credits:  1 - 7
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major/minor and permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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An independent study course. Matches students with community organizations in need of architecture-related services. Students do hands-on work serving community needs and pursue learning experiences with faculty.

ARC 499 Independent Study

Credits:  1 - 7
Semester:
Prerequisites:  architecture major/minor or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

An independent study course. Designed to add depth and breadth to a student's formal degree program. Students electing this course must be accepted for work on a specific topic by a member of the architectural faculty, and must have the approval of the department chair.

Updated: Aug 18, 2006 11:27:14 AM