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Environmental Design

Department of Urban and Regional Planning

School of Architecture and Planning
116 Hayes Hall
South Campus
Buffalo, NY 14214-3087

Phone: 716.829.2133
Fax: 716.829.3256
Web: www.ap.buffalo.edu/planning

Niraj Verma
Chair

R. J. Multari
Director of Undergraduate Advisement

About the Program

We live in times in which our urban and built environments are undergoing unprecedented change. The bachelor of arts and minor in environmental design provide students with the skills to understand, analyze, and solve problems associated with such change, with a view toward economic vitality, social fairness, and the design of sustainable environments. Environmental designers apply knowledge of social and behavioral science to plan and design community environments that affect, and are affected by, human behavior. While concerned about humanity�s use, misuse, and abuse of the natural environment, they are also concerned about the environment which humans build - the "artificial" or designed spatial environment - and its ability to meet user's needs. More subtly, they are also concerned about the cultural, economic, physical, political, and social environments. The purpose of the environmental designer is to gain better understanding of these community environments, and then apply that knowledge to design improved surroundings.

The bachelor of arts and minor in environmental design offers a preprofessional course of study grounded in the multidisciplinary traditions of the liberal arts and distinguished by active intervention and experience in community and regional environments through classroom activity, fieldwork, workshops, and internships.

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers a breadth of knowledge through its degree programs on understanding urban and built environments, and teaches skills in information analysis, computing, written communications, and graphic techniques. In addition, the department offers specialized courses in land use, community design, property development, local government policy, economic development, environmental affairs, real estate development, historic preservation, urban design, and geographic information systems. The preprofessional environmental design program utilizes the dynamic bi-national Buffalo-Niagara region as a laboratory for planning, design, and action.

Founded in 1969, the Department of Urban and Regional Planning has evolved to offer a number of degree programs, including an undergraduate preprofessional bachelor of arts (BA) and minor in environmental design, as well as an accredited professional master of urban planning (MUP) degree. In addition, the Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers a dual master of urban planning plus master of architecture (MArch + MUP) with the Department of Architecture, and a dual master of urban planning plus jurist doctor (MUP + JD) with the Law School.

Degree Options

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design. The bachelor of arts in environmental design is a preprofessional, 48-credit-hour curriculum offered by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, divided into four parts: an introductory sequence, core workshops, department electives (including internship opportunities), and senior-year synthesis courses. Courses from other UB departments, selected with the aid of a faculty advisor, supplement major courses. The environmental design major is typically completed within six semesters.

Minor in Environmental Design. The minor in environmental design provides students from diverse backgrounds a broad foundation in the principles of urban and community planning and the form and function of the built environment. This minor requires a minimum of six courses, totaling a minimum of 18 credits, from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. The program comprises two required lower-division courses and a minimum of four upper-division courses selected in consultation with a faculty advisor. The environmental design minor is typically completed within five to six semesters.

Acceptance Information

Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Design. Students are reviewed for admission consideration to the preprofessional bachelor of arts in environmental design by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning upon completing a minimum of 24 credit hours, attaining an overall minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0, and completing both PD 120 and PD 212 with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. Students generally apply to the program in the second semester of their sophomore year. Transfer students from other colleges should complete the required introductory courses prior to applying to the major, or may apply to waive these introductory courses if they have completed equivalent courses.

Minor in Environmental Design. Students are admitted to the minor in environmental design by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning upon earning an overall minimum GPA of 2.0 and completing either PD 120 or PD 212 with a minimum grade of B- (GPA of 2.67 on a 4.0 scale) or higher.

Admission Procedures. Both transfer students and current UB students must complete an environmental design departmental application, available from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement, or online at http://wings.buffalo.edu/ap/advising/envdsnadmit.htm. Dates for admission application submission are July 1 for fall admission and November 15 for spring admission. Applications received after July 1 for Fall admission consideration and November 15 for Spring admission consideration will be reviewed on a space-only available basis as guided by the School of Architecture and Planning�s admission statement. Contact the Department of Urban and Regional Planning or the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement for assistance.

Admission Statement. The School of Architecture and Planning has an admission policy that actively encourages applicants from protected groups, and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, disability or veteran status. Admission is competitive and applicants are reviewed according to the admission criteria. Acceptance of students in the preprofessional, professional, and postprofessional programs is determined on the basis of the applicants� qualifications and experience. However, since the School's size is limited, the programs may exercise discretionary powers of selection. Courses and programs offered by the School of Architecture and Planning may include an instructional technology fee. Visit http://wings.buffalo.edu/ap/advising or contact the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement for additional information on undergraduate admissions.

Advisement

All students in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning are assigned faculty advisors upon admission to the undergraduate preprofessional environmental design program. In addition, the School of Architecture and Planning�s Office of Undergraduate Advisement is available for assistance. Students are encouraged to consult regularly with their faculty advisors in matters pertaining to academic options, course selection, post-baccalaureate studies, and career opportunities. Students meet with advisors and mentors as often as they choose to explore educational opportunities available within the School of Architecture and Planning and the University at Buffalo and plan a course of study that is consistent with their abilities, achievements, interests, and expectations. The ultimate goal of advisement is to empower students to use the tools and resources available to become active and responsible learners. Visit http://wings.buffalo.edu/ap/advising/ for additional information on undergraduate advisement.

Academic Requirements

Students are reviewed on their progress in the preprofessional environmental design program by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning on an annual basis. The academic review evaluates the student's eligibility to continue onto the next level in the undergraduate program. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in environmental design program courses and a minimum cumulative UB GPA of 2.0 is required for satisfactory academic standing within the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Transfer Policy

Courses completed at other colleges and universities are not automatically accepted by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning as fulfilling undergraduate requirements. While select courses taken elsewhere may be accepted, determination is made by an evaluation of the student�s transcripts, course content, contact hours, and grades earned. A minimum course grade of B- (GPA of 2.67 on a 4.0 scale) is required for articulation to courses offered by the School of Architecture and Planning. Actual placement in the undergraduate preprofessional environmental design program is made after this evaluation is completed. No more than 12 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward environmental design major requirements, and no more than 6 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward environmental design minor requirements. Student transcript evaluations are conducted by the School of Architecture and Planning�s Office of Undergraduate Advisement. Visit http://wings.buffalo.edu/ap/ for additional information on transfer policies and procedures.

Honors, Awards, and Scholarships

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning gives a series of annual awards and prizes to honor undergraduate environmental design student excellence. These include:

Dean's Award for Academic Performance to the continuing environmental design student with the highest grade point average.

Award of Academic Excellence to the graduating environmental design senior with the highest grade point average.

Chair's Award for Excellence to the graduating senior who excelled in and contributed most to the bachelor of arts in environmental design program.

R. Buckminster Fuller Award (biannually) to the graduating senior who is continuing on for graduate studies within the UB School of Architecture and Planning who exemplifies attributes of creativity, inventiveness, and intellectual excellence.

Departmental Honors are awarded to graduating environmental design students who achieve a high level of academic excellence and ingenuity within the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research and Practical Experience

Internships. Environmental design students have the opportunity to work in urban or regional agencies in such areas as housing, strategic planning, transportation, community development, environmental affairs, and urban design. Environmental design internships are coordinated by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning�s Center for Urban Studies, located in 333 Hayes Hall.

Study Abroad. Traveling can enhance students' awareness of the world, bringing them closer to understanding global diversity, and appreciating what is universal and unique to a culture. In addition to the programs offered by UB�s Office of Study Abroad, the Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers undergraduate environmental design students an opportunity to participate in the following in-house study abroad programs:

Monteverde, Costa Rica. In residency at the Monteverde Institute, this eight- week summer course of study offers students the opportunity to live and work on ecological and social projects in a rural, but rapidly developing region in Costa Rica. This is a multidisciplinary program designed for students from various disciplines, including architecture, environmental design and urban planning, landscape architecture, resource management, and international development. Students may earn up to 13 credits participating in a seminar on sustainable development, Spanish language classes, and an intensive 7-credit studio/internship with one of the many organizations in the Monteverde zone working toward sustainability. The program is sponsored jointly by the UB School of Architecture and Planning and the University of Maryland at College Park Department of Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture. Fluency in Spanish is encouraged but not required.

Aruba, Dutch Antilles. The Planning for Sustainability summer program offered by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning is a one month overseas summer abroad. The 2006 program, hosted in Aruba, Dutch Antilles, offered a focused concentration on Tourism, Culture, and Environment in the Caribbean. The Planning for Sustainability is a multidisciplinary program designed for students from various disciplines, including architecture, environmental design and urban planning, environmental studies, economics, geography, engineering and applied sciences, anthropology, sociology, and political science. The academic program includes a 3 credit lecture and seminar course with a corresponding 3 credit hour studio. Classes are held at the University of Aruba as well as other environmental sites of interest.

Other in-house study abroad programs, such as Havana, Cuba, will be offered on an ad-hoc basis by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning based upon faculty and student interest.


Research Centers. As a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities (AAU), the University at Buffalo considers advanced research integral and fundamental to its mission. Consequently, the School of Architecture and Planning faculty are actively involved in the creation of new knowledge through sponsored research, creative design work, and text-based scholarship. This research activity is intertwined with the departmental curricula, allowing students to take full advantage of the faculty's expertise. The Department of Urban and Regional Planning is affiliated with the following centers, providing students interested in the urban and built environment with an opportunity for applied research activities:

Center for Urban Studies (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/research/cus.asp), 333 Hayes Hall, South Campus. A research and service entity seeking solutions to the problems facing central cities and metropolitan regions. Founded in 1987, the Center conducts action-based research on community and economic development, focusing on the needs and issues of traditionally marginalized groups, including blacks, Latinos, Asians, Native Americans, women, and low-wage workers. Recent projects include a community health study of Buffalo�s East Side, analysis of vacant lots and community economic development opportunities for Buffalo�s Fruitbelt neighborhood, and a physical design analysis of the city�s Old First Ward. The center employs graduate students to assist with projects, including The Cyberhood, an online resource to engage and educate viewers on issues of neighborhood and community development.

Urban Design Project (http://urbandesignproject.ap.buffalo.edu/), 272 Hayes Hall, South Campus. A university center devoted to research, teaching and scholarship in the pursuit of a critical practice of urban design. Founded in 1990, it focuses on issues of community development and urban revitalization while fostering the intellectual exploration of architecture and planning. From 1994 through 1999, the project led the five-year public visioning process for downtown Buffalo and all its council districts. The project also oversaw the master planning and conceptual design development for the facilities supporting the Bosque Eterno de los Ni�os and the Instituto de Monteverde in Costa Rica. More recently, it has led the effort to develop the City of Buffalo�s Downtown Strategic Plan. The work of the Urban Design Project has encompassed faculty consultations, student internships, studio projects, and supervised thesis investigations dealing with New York sites ranging from Niagara Falls to Buffalo to Jamestown and engaging such institutional partners as Buffalo Place, the City of Buffalo, the Waterfront Regeneration Trust, the City of Niagara Falls, and the Chautauqua County government, as well as several regional and national architectural and planning firms.

Institute for Local Governance and Regional Growth (http://regional-institute.buffalo.edu/), Beck Hall, South Campus. The institute initiates and supports efforts to strengthen Western New York and the Buffalo-Niagara region. A major public service program of UB, the institute contributes to and supports regional planning, government efficiency, economic development, service delivery, and other areas crucial to the region�s vitality. The Institute conducts research, assists municipal and county governments, and sustains ongoing projects including the State of the Region Project, the Western New York Regional Information Network, and the Regional Economic Development Database project.

Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (www.ap.buffalo.edu/idea/), 378 Hayes Hall, South Campus. The IDEA Center is dedicated to improving the design of environments and products by making them more usable, safe, and appealing to people with a wide range of abilities through their life spans. It is active in basic and applied research, design development, community service, and education. Current programs focus on home modifications, functional assessment, and universal design within the built and constructed environment.

Notable Program Features

The Faculty
Senior faculty from the Department of Urban and Regional Planning teach many courses in the undergraduate preprofessional environmental design program. In addition, some courses are taught by professional urban planners, public officials, environmental administrators, and community developers. Visit our Web site at http://www.ap.buffalo.edu/planning/people to learn more about the department's faculty.

Facilities
The Architecture and Planning Library (http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/units/apl/), located in Hayes Hall, is one of ten libraries within the University at Buffalo. In addition to its book and journal collections, the Architecture and Planning Library collection includes student theses, maps and plans, a vertical file, a collection of CD-ROMs, census materials, and computer-aided design work.

The Computing Resource Laboratories (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/crl-overview.asp) comprise two sets of facilities: a central collection of laboratories and computing classrooms, and a collection of distributed facilities located in the graduate and undergraduate architecture and planning studios. A wide variety of software packages is provided to support the specific needs of architecture and planning students. Input and output resources include a variety of specialized devices, including color scanners, a large-format scanner, a slide scanner, a film recorder, several digital cameras, CD-R/CS-RW writers, and large- and small-format digitizers. Hard-copy output is provided through laser printers, color printers, and a large-format color postscript plotter.

The design studios and workshops (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/studios.asp), located within the School of Architecture and Planning, have more than 63,000 net square feet of studio and studio support space including four critique rooms, wet cells for plaster and paint work, a full-service plotting and printing facility, and a total of six educational technology classrooms, including a newly renovated, 115 seat, educational technology lecture hall. Digital technology is distributed throughout the studios located in Crosby and Hayes Halls, reflecting our belief that digital media should be seamlessly integrated with the making and representation of architecture and planning. Studio and workshop spaces are networked and outfitted with multiple high-end computers supporting a wide range of CAD, GIS, and graphic software programs.

The Dyett Exhibition Hall (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/dyett.asp) is an exhibition space created as a place to display student and faculty work, as well as to feature national and international traveling exhibits.

The Materials and Methods Shop (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/shop.asp), machine and assembly space, is available for schoolwide projects and independent work. This complete machine and assembly shop, one of the finest in any U.S. architecture and planning school, contains 7,000 square feet of high-bay space and is supplied with full woodworking capabilities, welding and milling equipment, lathes, sheet-metal machines, a vacuum-forming machine for molding plastic, and a variety of hand tools.

The Visual Resources Center (www.ap.buffalo.edu/sap/facilities/vrc.asp) is a joint School of Architecture and Planning and University Libraries facility. It directly supports the curriculum with its growing collection of 31,500 slides, 250 videotapes, and audiovisual equipment. It is linked to the university�s other collections through the University Libraries� online computerized index service.

Publications.
Intersight (www.ap.buffalo.edu/intersight/) is a schoolwide, student-edited scholarly journal published biennially. The founders of the journal set out to create a participatory forum for distinguished colleagues, faculty, graduates, and students to express their views and ideas about architecture and urban planning. The mission of Intersight is to publish writing, research, and design work that reflects the intellectual life of the School of Architecture and Planning.

Community Outreach Programs. Students in the Department of Urban and Regional Planning have unrivalled access to agencies, municipalities, and local leaders for information, resources, and undergraduate internships. Workshop courses offered in the pre-professional environmental design program focus on real-world exercises in planning and design throughout the Buffalo-Niagara region. In the senior-year workshop, environmental design students work with a public, private, or nonprofit client to analyze and engage in the social, economic, political, and physical design issues associated with complex planning problems. Recent clients have included Heartland Forest Niagara; Buffalo�s Massachusetts Avenue People United for Sustainable Housing community agency; Buffalo�s Broadway-Fillmore neighborhood development corporation; the Roycroft Revitalization Corporation; Buffalo's University Heights Community Initiative; Hilbert College; and the Burchfield-Penney Art Gallery located at Buffalo State College.

Career Opportunities/Further Study

Both the preprofessional bachelor of arts and minor in environmental design, offered by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, aim to provide students with the versatility to succeed in a variety of fields. Graduates of the preprofessional program have sound preparation for entry-level employment in urban planning, community design, environmental affairs, real estate or related fields; in town, city, county, or state government; and in nonprofit organizations, such as development corporations, historic preservation societies, and housing or transportation agencies.

Environmental design graduates are also prepared for graduate study in the professions or the social sciences, in fields such as urban and regional planning, architecture and landscape architecture, environmental studies, geography and geographic information systems, real estate development, political science, public policy and administration, environmental education and research, educational administration, law, and business administration. Information gathered from graduates indicate that one-third of environmental design alumni continue their postbaccalaureate studies at the University at Buffalo.

Environmental Design - B.A.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Minimum GPA of 2.5 in the prerequisite courses.
Minimum completion of 24 credit hours.

Advising Notes

A minimum prerequisite GPA of 2.5 and a minimum overall GPA of 2.0 are required for admission consideration.

Dates for departmental admission application submission are July 1 for fall admission and November 15 for spring admission. Applications received after July 1 for Fall admission consideration and November 15 for Spring admission consideration will be reviewed on a space-only available basis as guided by the School of Architecture and Planning�s admission statement. Contact the Department of Urban and Regional Planning or the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement for assistance.

Transfer students from other colleges should complete the required introductory courses prior to applying to the major or may apply to waive these introductory courses if they have completed equivalent coursework. No more than 12 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward major requirements.

Workshop courses (PD 350, PD 360, and PD 450) are majors-only courses and require admission to the environmental design program. Concurrent enrollment in the following combination of program courses is not permitted: PD 350/PD 450, PD 360/PD 460, and PD 360/PD 490.

No more than 3 credits of PD 496 Environmental Design Internship and 3 credits of PD 499 Independent Study may be applied toward major requirements.

A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in department courses and senior standing is required for enrollment in PD 494 Visions of the City and PD 498 Research Projects in Environmental Design.

A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in department courses is required for successful completion of major requirements, and the preprofessional bachelor of arts in environmental design is typically completed within six semesters.

Intended and admitted environmental design majors and minors should go to the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Hayes Hall, for advisement.

Prerequisite Courses

PD 120 Introduction to Urban Studies
PD 212 Urban and Environmental Planning

Required Courses

PD 350 Environmental Design Workshop I: Information Analysis
PD 360 Environmental Design Workshop II: Graphic Communications
PD 450 Environmental Design Workshop III: Projects and Processes
PD 494 Visions of the City
PD 498 Research Projects in Environmental Design
18 credit hours of department electives at the 300 level or higher

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major: 48

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST OR SECOND YEAR
Fall- PD 120
Spring- PD 212

THIRD YEAR
Fall- PD 350, PD electives
Spring- PD 360, PD electives

FOURTH YEAR
Fall- PD 450, PD electives
Spring- PD 494, PD 498, PD electives

Electives and Course Groupings

The following is a sample, but not all-inclusive, list of possible electives offered by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning:

PD 301 Perspectives on Land Use and Development
PD 302 Technology and Public Policy
PD 303 Methods of Communication
PD 305 Environmental Assessment
PD 308 Problem Solving in Urban Environments
PD 312 Design of Cities
PD 313 Local Government Policy and Politics
PD 328 Historic Preservation
PD 355 Urban and Environmental Information
PD 356 Computing for Environmental Analysis
PD 362 Property Management
PD 379 The City Through Film
PD 402 Real Estate Development Business
PD 404 Introduction to Urban Management
PD 406 Community Development Processes
PD 407 Site Planning and Design
PD 409 Technology and Urban Social Change
PD 422 Economic Development Planning
PD 425 CAD Technology in Planning and Design
PD 443 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution
PD 463 Cities and Globalization
PD 469 GIS Applications
PD 472 Designing Livable Communities
PD 496 Environmental Design Internship
PD 499 Independent Study

Environmental Design - Minor

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0.
Minimum �B-� in PD 120 or PD 212.

Advising Notes

No more than 6 credits of transfer coursework may be applied toward minor requirements.

No more than 3 credits of PD 496 Environmental Design Internship and 3 credits of PD 499 Independent Study may be applied toward environmental design minor requirements.

Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in department courses required for successful completion of minor.

For undergraduate information, or for an admission application to the minor in environmental design, contact the School of Architecture and Planning's Office of Undergraduate Advisement.

Prerequisite Courses

PD 120 Introduction to Urban Studies or PD 212 Urban and Environmental Planning

Required Courses

PD 120 Introduction to Urban Studies or PD 212 Urban and Environmental Planning (whichever is not taken as the prerequisite course)
Minimum of four department electives and 12 credits at the 300 level or higher

Summary
Total required credit hours for the minor: 18

Course Descriptions

PD 111 American Diversity and Design

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

An American Pluralism cognate. Cross-listed with ARC 211 American Diversity and Design, an approved American Pluralism course. Open to non-majors.

PD 120 Introduction to Urban Studies

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An introductory course and approved social science general education course. Examines concepts and content related to cities, suburbs, and metropolitan regions within and outside the U.S. From multidisciplinary perspectives, covers media images of cities and suburbs, patterns and trends in urban settlements over time and place, urban observation, demographics, culture, and design, and contemporary urban issues, including race relations, environmental issues, and crime. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. Open to non-majors.

PD 212 Urban and Environmental Planning

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An introductory course and approved social science general education course. Examines concepts and content in urban and environmental planning. Covers the who, what, why, and how of planning as a profession and process. Topics include the legal basis for urban and environmental planning, planning tools and techniques, the development process, community design issues, and major planning foci, such as sprawl and growth management, neighborhood development, transportation systems, historic preservation, and environmental affairs. Involves lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. Open to non-majors.

PD 301 Perspectives on Land Use and Development

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Covers concepts and practices of urban land use and development in U.S. Topics include zoning, growth management, site design, and land use evolution. Includes fieldwork.

PD 302 Technology and Public Policy

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A major or minor elective. Investigates the various approaches governments use to regulate or control communication and information technologies. Specific issues addressed include equality of access in urban and rural communities and related public policies. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 303 Methods of Communication

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A major or minor elective. Develops communication skills on urban and environmental issues, and hones skills of description and reporting about urban and environmental places and policies. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 305 Environmental Assessment

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Analyzes methods for recognizing, quantifying, and evaluating policy-driven and environmental assessment. Considers various roles for community planners in shaping environmental outcomes.

PD 308 Problem Solving in Urban Environments

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Explores current issues found in urban and built environments, examines associated problems and processes, and reviews possible solutions. Topics vary annually. In the past, the course has covered U.S.-Canadian border issues. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 312 Design of Cities

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A major or minor elective. Traces evolution of urban form and character from Greek city-states to the present. Emphasizes how technological, social, economic, and political changes affect urban layout and functioning.

PD 313 Local Government Policy and Politics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Provides insights to the process and outcomes of local government decision-making. Topics include the types and powers of various local government entities, including: the influence of politics, how governments determine agendas, and implement projects/policies.

PD 328 Historic Preservation

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 212
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A major or minor elective. Historic preservation theory related to urban and environmental planning, emphasizing preservation practice, including tools of effective preservation, legislation, community roles, economics, adaptive use, and management. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 350 Environmental Design Workshop I: Information Analysis

Credits:  6
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  junior standing and environmental design major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A required workshop; first in a three-course sequence. Provides students with research skills in gathering, analyzing, interpreting, and communicating qualitative and quantitative information about the contemporary environment and its possible futures. Data sources include U.S. Census materials, state and regional agency databases, historical archives, and online and hardcopy reports and surveys.

PD 355 Urban and Environmental Information

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Examines, uses, and assesses urban information systems, such as signage, environmental data, and neighborhood demographics. Lectures, discussions, and fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 356 Computing for Environmental Analysis

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Covers basics of geographic information systems (GIS) and other computing tools for understanding, mapping, and analyzing natural and built environments. Includes weekly computer lab.

PD 360 Environmental Design Workshop II: Graphic Communications

Credits:  6
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  junior standing and environmental design major
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A majors-only required workshop; second in a three-course sequence. Introduces modes of visual literacy for comprehending the built environment and rudimentary graphic representation skills for communicating design concepts through readings and hands-on exercises. Class activities include drawing, generating computer graphics, and urban observation.

PD 362 Property Management

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Examines management of residential, commercial, and industrial properties within various community settings. Reviews property site selection procedures and community land use planning. Investigates activities within property management including market surveys, planning, design, aesthetics, renovations, and forecasting demand within urban and regional environments. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 379 The City Through Film

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Formerly PD 279; both courses cannot be taken for credit.

A major or minor elective. Through weekly film screenings, discussions, readings, and critiques, explores themes of urban imagery, inner city, city-suburb relations, community planning and politics, and urban futures in cinema. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 395 Special Topics

Credits:  6
Semester:
Prerequisites:  junior standing and environmental design major/minor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed data analysis, information dissemination, geographic computing technologies, and communication techniques on urban and environmental issues. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 402 Real Estate Development Business

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 212 or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Introduces students to all aspects of real estate development, including planning, site acquisition, project feasibility, finance, and development. Uses case studies, small group activities, fieldwork, readings, and discussions.

PD 404 Introduction to Urban Management

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 350 and senior standing and permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Introduces concepts of urban management, including roles of community planners as advocates, advisors, and information resources. Examines complex inner-city problems and reforms. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 405 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed the development and management of real estate property. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 406 Community Development Processes

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 350 and senior standing or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Studies theories, concepts, and practices of neighborhood planning and community development, emphasizing local urban neighborhoods.

PD 407 Site Planning and Design

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 350 or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A major or minor elective. Examines environmental impacts and capacity of physical infrastructure systems in relation to the site requirements of various urban and community settings. Presents and analyzes planning and design ideas through investigation and review of site conditions. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 408 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed the planning and design of suburban communities. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 409 Technology and Urban Social Change

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. Considers significant themes and trends in technology, global culture, and social relations shaping our urban and community futures. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 410 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed the policies and politics of local government. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 412 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed issues in environmental design and development planning in practice. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 413 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed legal issues in planning, design, and development. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 422 Economic Development Planning and Industrial Change

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PD 350 and senior standing or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Covers theory, concepts, and practices in contemporary economic development planning. Considers alternative approaches to job growth, including industrial development, workforce training, and quality of life strategies.

PD 439 Local Government Finance and Budgeting

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  Junior or senior standing
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces students to the theory, practice, and real world applications of the financial operations of local government. Concentrates on issues of public budgeting, revenue analysis, and issues of special concern to local planning, including fiscal impact of development , public school finance, and tax increment financing models. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 443 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PD 350 and senior standing and permission of the instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Introduces and practices techniques in negotiations and bargaining, particularly as applied to planning and environmental conflict. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 450 Environmental Design Workshop III: Projects and Processes

Credits:  6
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PD 350, PD 360, and senior standing in environmental design
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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A majors-only required workshop; third in a three-course sequence. Engages students in urban planning and environmental design fieldwork in Western New York. Under the instructor�s supervision, students work with clients and community groups to understand complex urban and environmental issues, research best practices, and develop final reports and presentations.

PD 457 Tourism and Recreation Planning

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 350
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Examines a variety of specific tourism and recreation ventures and explores how they can be used to enhance development. Considered from several perspectives; including the role of tourism in economic development and the community level relationship between hosts and guests. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 463 Cities and Globalization

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 350 and senior standing and permission of the instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Considers "world cities" and how global trends and forces shape the community design, politics, social life, and economies of urban places. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 469 GIS Applications

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 356 and senior standing or permission of the instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Covers theory, techniques, and applications in geographic information systems, particularly as applied to planning problems and issues. Includes weekly computer lab. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 472 Designing Livable Communities

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 301 and senior standing or permission of the instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Introduces concepts and techniques in community design, land use, site planning, property development, and redevelopment. Involves fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 473 Physical and Spatial Planning

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PD 301 and senior standing or permission of the instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Introduces concepts and techniques in land use planning, site plan assessment, property development, and redevelopment planning. Involves fieldwork. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 479 Global Issues Futures

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PD 350 and senior standing and permission of the instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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A major or minor elective. Covers concepts and methods in futures planning, including scenario development, planning projections, and global trend analysis. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 480 Environmental Design Study Abroad

Credits:  3 \ 3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  Environmental design major or permission
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB/LEC

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A majors-only study abroad course; locations vary annually. In the past, undergraduate students have participated in environmental design study abroads taught in Australia, Cuba, Costa Rica, the Dutch Antilles, and other international locations as organized by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Other in-house study abroad programs will be offered on an ad-hoc basis by the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, based upon faculty and student interest. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 488 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed hidden systems of cities and urban environments- utilities, water, sewer, telecommunications, and transport. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 489 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed urban hazards and disasters and community revitalization planning. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 491 Special Topics

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

A major or minor elective. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed community planning, tourism planning, and environmental design. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 492 Colloquium I

Credits:  1
Semester:
Prerequisites:   Majors-only or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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Topics vary annually. In the past, an examination of issues pertaining to environmental design, community planning, and regional development. Included historical, theoretical, formal, technical, and ethical concerns in planning, design, and development. Content defined by instructor; with group discussions focused on assigned readings and field trips. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 493 Colloquium II

Credits:  1
Semester:
Prerequisites:  Majors-only or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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Topics vary annually. In the past, an examination of issues pertaining to environmental design, community planning, and regional development. Included historical, theoretical, formal, technical, and ethical concerns in planning, design, and development. Content defined by instructor; with group discussions focused on assigned readings and field trips. May be offered on an intermittent basis.

PD 494 Visions of the City

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PD 350, PD 360, and senior standing in environmental design
Corequisites:  PD 498
Type:  SEM

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A required synthesis/capstone course. Student-led, faculty-guided reading course covers classic and contemporary books on the natural and built environments.

PD 496 Environmental Design Internship

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp Su
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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A major or minor elective. Offers opportunity to work in urban or regional agencies in areas such as housing, strategic planning, transportation, community development, environmental affairs, and urban design.

PD 498 Research Projects in Environmental Design

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PD 350, PD 360, and senior standing in environmental design
Corequisites:  PD 494
Type:  SEM

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A required synthesis/capstone course. Engages students in environmental design methods and individual research on a topic of contemporary interest. Topics vary annually. In the past this course addressed community planning, urban/suburban relations, urban subcultures, urban hazards and disasters, environmental planning, and housing development.

PD 499 Independent Study

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp Su
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

An independent study course. Designed to add depth and breadth to a student's degree program. Students electing this course must be accepted for work on a specific topic by a member of the faculty, and must have the approval of the department's chair.

Updated: Feb 16, 2007 10:19:53 AM