UB Undergraduate Catalog 2006-2007: Occupational Therapy

Occupational Therapy

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences

School of Public Health and Health Professions
515 Kimball Tower
South Campus
Buffalo, NY 14214-3079

Phone: 716.829.3141
Fax: 716.829.3217
Web: sphhp.buffalo.edu/ot

Michael F. Noe
Interim Chair

Susan M. Nochajski
Program Director

About the Program

The Occupational Therapy program at the University at Buffalo is based on the philosophical belief that people have a vital need for occupation. Occupation is defined as the ways in which people occupy their time and includes such activities as self-care, play, work, and leisure. One engages in occupation for three primary reasons: (1) to acquire the skills and behaviors necessary for ensuring one�s survival, (2) to achieve a sense of quality in one�s life, and (3) to contribute to the progress and well-being of society by being a productive member of that society.

Based on the assumption that it is within the context of roles that people engage in occupation, the concept of occupational role emerged to account for those major life roles that occupy one�s time. These major life roles or occupational roles have a developmental perspective and change over the course of a lifetime. They include the roles of preschooler, student, worker and/or homemaker, and retiree. Each role has its associated age-appropriate and role-appropriate tasks that influence the nature of one�s occupations. What evolves in responding to these tasks is called occupational behavior. Occupational competence is defined as an individual�s ability to engage in a fulfilling lifestyle consistent with his or her goals and values.

When individuals are threatened by deprivation, disease, illness, or injury, occupational therapy intervenes to protect and/or restore (1) the individual�s physical, psychological, and social capacities to achieve occupational competence; and (2) the skills and habits of effective role performance. Occupational therapy is committed to providing services to the �whole person�; thus, occupational therapy is holistic in its orientation to health care.

The entry-level professional occupational science/occupational therapy program is a five year combined BS/MS program. Preceding their professional preparation, students receive a liberal arts education in their pre-professional studies. The professional program, structured to prepare students for personal and professional development, is flexible enough to meet the needs and interests of individual students while still ensuring that upon graduation they will be competent to enter the profession.

Professional-level classes begin in the summer immediately preceding the junior year. The ten-week summer program includes ANA 407 Gross Human Anatomy (6 credit hours), which meets daily for eight weeks, and OT 351 OT Practice Skills I (2 credit hours), which continues for ten days following ANA 407. Three additional academic semesters and a summer at the undergraduate level provide learning experiences structured to integrate theory and practice. During the second semester of the fourth year, students progress to the MS component of the program. At this time, students register for six months of full-time supervised fieldwork experience.

Students choose fieldwork sites by a lottery system and in consultation with the fieldwork director. Additional fieldwork experiences in such specialized areas of practice as developmental disabilities, substance abuse, and ergonomics are available as electives. The program maintains clinical affiliation agreements with more than 150 health-care facilities throughout the United States for student placement. Students should expect to leave the Western New York area to fulfill this requirement. Upon completion of fieldwork, students return to the campus for the fifth year of the program.

Degree Options

Students are awarded the combined BS/MS degree in occupational science/occupational therapy upon completion of all program and university requirements. Students who do not progress to the MS component of the program will be awarded a BS in occupational science after the successful completion of the 129 credits in the BS portion of the program. Only students who are awarded the combined BS/MS are eligible to take the national certification examination administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220, (301) 652-AOTA.

Acceptance Information

The Occupational Therapy program has a Freshman Admission Policy. Students who declare occupational therapy as their major on the UB application are automatically accepted into the occupational Therapy program. Courses in the first two years of the BS program meet the general education requirements and occupational science pre-requisite courses. Students must complete the required pre-requisite courses with a grade of C or better and have a minimum GPA of 2.8 in the pre-requisite courses to advance to professional level status during the summer between the sophomore and junior years. By January 15 of the second year of the program, students accepted into the occupational therapy program under the Freshman Admission or Transfer Student Admission Policy (see below), must complete a Promotion to Professional Sequence form. Additionally, students must submit evidence of a minimum of seventy hours of volunteer/work experience in an occupational therapy setting providing direct patient/client care under the supervision of an occupational therapist.

Promotion to the professional sequence is competitive for students other than those admitted as freshman or transfer students. Students not accepted through the freshman or transfer admission policies must (1) have a minimum grade of C in all prerequisite courses; (2) complete, by January 15 of the sophomore year, a minimum of seventy hours of recent (within the past two years) volunteer or work experience in a direct patient care environment, under the supervision of an occupational therapist; and (3) submit an application by January 15 of the sophomore year.

Advisement

During the pre-professional phase of the program (Years 1 and 2), occupational therapy students should contact Diane Gayles or Cassandra Walker-Whiteside at (716) 829-3434 for academic advisement; transfer students should contact Douglas Frye at (716) 829-3141. Upon promotion to the professional sequence of the program, each student is assigned a faculty advisor from the Occupational Therapy program.

Transfer Policy

Students can enter the Occupational Therapy program as transfer students from other institutions. Any transfer student who meets the minimum requirements for admission into the University at Buffalo is qualified for acceptance directly into the Occupational Therapy program; however, courses completed at other colleges or universities are not automatically accepted by the program as fulfilling the prerequisite requirements. Determination is made by an evaluation of the student�s transcripts, descriptions of courses that he/she has taken, and credit hours completed. It is recommended that prospective transfer students contact the department to determine the suitability of prior coursework. Also, all students must meet the criteria for promotion to the professional sequence of the program. (See additional information under Acceptance Information).

Currently, the program has an articulation agreement with Jamestown Community College, and prerequisite course equivalencies have been established.

Honors, Awards, and Scholarships

A number of scholarships and financial aid opportunities are available each year to OT students. The following are some of the scholarships routinely available:

The American Occupational Therapy Foundation (AOTF). A limited number of scholarships are available for undergraduate and graduate OT students. An applicant for a foundation scholarship must: (1) be a member of the American Occupational Therapy Association, (2) be enrolled as a full-time student in occupational therapy, (3) demonstrate a need for financial assistance, and (4) have a record of outstanding scholastic achievement.

New York State Occupational Therapy Association (NYSOTA) Scholarships. Awards are granted annually from the Wollman Scholarship Fund. To qualify, students must (1) be currently enrolled full-time or accepted into an occupational therapy program in New York State leading to a bachelor's or higher degree, (2) be a resident of New York State, and (3) be a NYSOTA member. Awards are granted on the basis of community and professional involvement, academic excellence, personal maturity, professional promise, and financial need, not necessarily in that order of importance.

Stonegraber Scholarship Fund. This fund was established in memory of Eleanor and David Stonegraber. Mrs. Stonegraber was an OTR in the Buffalo and Rochester areas and director of occupational therapy at Rochester Psychiatric Center at the time of her retirement in 1959. The fund provides financial aid for students in occupational therapy and physical therapy at the University at Buffalo. The amount varies from year to year, ranging from 0 to ,500. To qualify, a student must (1) demonstrate financial need, (2) show academic promise, and (3) have a firm commitment to the profession.

Linda Walters Memorial Scholarship. This award was established to remember the efforts of Linda Walters, an OT student whose ill health prevented her from completing the professional program at UB. Beginning 1993, this scholarship has been issued to a senior OT student who is a COTA. To apply for this award, students must demonstrate professional promise and financial need.

Niagara Frontier District, NYSOTA (NFD/NYSOTA). The district OT association provides scholarship assistance to students at the University at Buffalo. Other district associations of the NYSOTA also offer scholarships to students whose permanent residence is located within one of these other districts.

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research and Practical Experience

The School of Public Health and Health Professions has a linkage agreement for scholarly exchange and collaboration with the Universidade Presidente Antonio Carlos (UNIPAC), Barbacena (MG) in Brazil. As a result of this agreement, occupational therapy students have the opportunity to travel to Brazil to visit occupational therapy educational programs, rehabilitation programs, clinics, and hospitals. Students also have the opportunity to host and interact with Brazilian students, both professionally and socially, who are visiting the University at Buffalo.

There are several opportunities for research experiences for occupational therapy students. Faculty are involved in research in a variety of areas including: school to work transition for students with disabilities, impact of assistive technology and environmental adaptations on elders and persons with disabilities, and effects of activity and exercise on functional abilities on persons with multiple sclerosis and other disabilities.

Career Opportunities/Further Study

Occupational therapists work in all types of private, nonprofit, and public settings, including schools, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation centers, and community health agencies.

An advanced MS is also available that will prepare professionals for research and advanced clinical practice.

Occupational Science/Occupational Therapy - B.S./M.S.

Acceptance Criteria

The occupational therapy program has a freshman and transfer admission policy in effect. Students indicating on the University at Buffalo application that occupational therapy is their intended major are accepted into the program. However, in order to take courses in the upper level, professional sequence of the program, students must:

Complete a Promotion to Professional Sequence form, which includes a personal statement, by the January 15th prior to the third year of the program;

Complete all prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better;

Maintain a minimum GPA of 2.8 in all prerequisite courses;

Complete 70 hours of volunteer work in an occupational therapy setting providing direct patient/client care under the supervision of an occupational therapist; the volunteer form is to be submitted with the Promotion to Professional Sequence form.

All students other than those admitted as freshman or transfer students must submit an OT application form by the January 15th prior to the third year of the program. All other requirements are the same as listed above.

Advising Notes

During the pre-professional phase of the program (Years 1 and 2), occupational therapy students should contact Diane Gayles or Cassandra Walker-Whiteside at (716) 829-3434 for academic advisement; transfer students should contact Douglas Frye at (716) 829-3141. Upon promotion to the professional sequence of the program, each student is assigned a faculty advisor from the occupational therapy program.

Prerequisite Courses

ANA 113 Human Anatomy (offered fall semester only)
OT 230 Fundamentals of Therapeutic Interaction (offered spring semester only)
OT 301 Orientation to Occupational Therapy (offered fall semester only)
OT 317 Medical Terminology and Pharmacology (offered fall semester only)
PGY 300 Human Physiology
PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy
PHY 101/PHY 151 College Physics I with Lab (offered fall semester only)
PSY 101 Introductory Psychology
STA 119 Statistical Methods
PSY 322 Abnormal Psychology
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
UGC 211 American Pluralism or SOC 211 Sociology of Diversity

Required Courses

(These courses are not open to freshman or sophomore students.)

ANA 407 Gross Human Anatomy
OT 314 Pediatric Dysfunction and Occupation
OT 322 Rehabilitation Medicine II
OT 342 Neuroscience I
OT 343 Neuroscience II
OT 344 Neuroanatomy I
OT 345 Neuroanatomy II
OT 351 OT Practice Skills I
OT 352 OT Practice Skills II
OT 353 OT Practice Skills III
OT 361 Functional Anatomy
OT 371 Human Development I
OT 372 Human Development II
OT 380 Research Literature & Scientific Writing
OT 381 Occupational Therapy Theory
OT 382 Issues in Occupational Therapy
OT 402 Psychosocial Practice I
OT 403 Psychosocial Practice II
OT 405 Physical Disabilities Practice
OT 410 Applied Neurophysiology
OT 412 Rehabilitation Medicine I
OT 440 Pediatric Practice
OT 450 Prosthetics and Orthotics
OT 504 Advanced Management for OT
OT 505 Advanced Clinical Seminar
OT 507 Advanced Clinical Seminar
OT 509 Community Based Practice
OT 551 Occupational Behavior Theory
OT 560 Level II Fieldwork
OT 561 Level II Fieldwork
OT 563 Project Seminar I
OT 564 Project Seminar II
Two electives

Summary
Total required credit hours for the undergraduate portion (occupational science): 109
Total required credit hours for the BS/MS (occupational science/occupational therapy): 153

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�ANA 113, PSY 101
Spring�OT 230, PSY 322

SECOND YEAR
Fall�OT 317, PHY 101/PHY 151, SOC 101; OT 301 (direct transfer students only must take in junior year)
Spring�PGY 300, PHI 101, STA 119, UGC 211

SUMMER BEFORE THIRD YEAR
Summer�ANA 407, OT 351

THIRD YEAR
Fall�OT 314, OT 412, OT 342, OT 344, OT 371, OT 380, OT 381; OT 301 (direct transfer students only)
Spring�OT 322, OT 343, OT 345, OT 352, OT 361, OT 372, OT 382

SUMMER BEFORE FOURTH YEAR
Summer - OT 402, OT 403

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�OT 353, OT 405, OT 410, OT 440, OT 450
Spring� OT 560, OT 561

FIFTH YEAR
Fall - OT 504; OT 505 or elective; OT 506, OT 551, OT 563
Spring - OT 507 or elective; OT 509, OT 564, elective

Electives and Course Groupings

OT 530 Computer Access 1
OT 533 Wheeled Mobility and Seat
OT 534 Ergonomics and Job Accommodation
OTD 517 Principles of OT with the Physically Disabled
OTD 532 Societal Impact
OTE 514 Eval Tx Prin Infant
OTE 515 Eval Tx Prin 2
OTE 516 Advanced Evaluation and Treatment Principles III

Course Descriptions

OT 230 Therapeutic Interaction

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Examines therapeutic approaches used by occupational therapists in working with patients and their families. Also explores interactions among work, play/leisure, and self-care.

OT 301 Orientation to Occupational Therapy

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Provides an overview of philosophy, theory, and occupational therapy practice.

OT 314 Pediatric Dysfunction and Occupation

Credits:  2
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Presents the etiology, course, prognosis, and medical management of diseases and disabilities of concern to occupational therapists working with children.

OT 317 Medical Terminology and Pharmacology

Credits:  1
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces language used by health-care professionals whose medical decisions affect and determine the course of the rehabilitation and therapeutic process. The course includes a four-week introductory unit on the fundamentals of pharmacology.

OT 322 Rehabilitation Medicine II

Credits:  2
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Examines various orthopedic conditions, their clinical management, and their impact on occupational performance.

OT 342 Neuroscience I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ANA 407
Corequisites:  OT 344
Type:  LEC

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Explores the fundamental neurophysiology and clinical neuroanatomy of sensory systems.

OT 343 Neuroscience II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ANA 407
Corequisites:  OT 345
Type:  LEC

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A continuation of OT 342, focusing on clinical neuroanatomy of motor systems and integration of sensory, motor, and cognitive functions.

OT 344 Neuroanatomy I

Credits:  1
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  ANA 407
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Exposes students to anatomical structures associated with neurophysiological concepts discussed in OT 342 and OT 343.

OT 345 Neuroanatomy II

Credits:  1
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  ANA 407
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Exposes students to the anatomical structures associated with neurophysiological concepts discussed in OT 342 and OT 343.

OT 351 OT Practice Skills I

Credits:  2
Semester: Su
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Explores the use of various media and activity analysis as therapeutic resources for occupational therapists. Provides students with principles and procedures necessary to restore occupational roles and daily living skills with persons experiencing dysfunction.

OT 352 OT Practice Skills II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Focuses on assistive technology and environmental adaptations to meet individual occupational performance needs.

OT 353 OT Practice Skills III

Credits:  2
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Addresses activities related to adult life roles, including occupation-based activity, wheelchair evaluations, driver evaluations, environmental assessment and adaptation, aquatic therapy, physical agent modalities, and community access.

OT 361 Functional Anatomy

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Examines kinesiology, biomechanics, and ergonomics for occupational therapy students.

OT 371 Human Development I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Considers human development from the prenatal period of life through adolescence. Also examines factors affecting growth and development during this time span and their significance in evaluation and treatment.

OT 372 Human Development II

Credits:  2
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Explores human development from young adult to aged. Also considers factors affecting growth and development during this time span and their significance in evaluation and treatment.

OT 380 Research Literature and Scientific Writing

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

An overview and practical application of skills required for scientific and social science writing. Introduces reading and interpretation of research and evidence-based practice literature.

OT 381 Theory of Occupational Therapy With Lab

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Presents the philosophy and theory of occupational therapy. Also examines the theory of occupational behavior, which provides a broad perspective for practice. The lab provides experience with occupational assessment.

OT 382 Issues in Service Delivery

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Gives an overview of current issues impacting the roles, functions, and provision of OT service in diverse areas of occupational therapy practice, from clinical and management perspectives.

OT 402 Psychosocial Practice I

Credits:  4
Semester: Su
Prerequisites:  OT 351
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Reviews the medical management of psychiatric disorders and occupational therapy intervention strategies in treating the mentally ill, and introduces group process theory.

OT 403 Psychosocial Practice II

Credits:  3 \ 2
Semester: Su
Prerequisites:  OT 402
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Incorporates an in-depth study of practice issues in mental health with a group process lab. Includes one-week, full time Level I fieldwork.

OT 405 Physical Disabilities Practice

Credits:  4 \ 1
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  OT 342, OT 343
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Applies occupational theory and techniques in the treatment of persons with a physical disability. Includes one week full-time Level I fieldwork.

OT 410 Applied Neurophysiology

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  OT 342, OT 343
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Considers the basic concepts underlying neurophysiological control of motor behavior, and applies these concepts in the treatment of neuromuscular dysfunction.

OT 412 Rehabilitation Medicine I

Credits:  2
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Examines various orthopedic conditions, their clinical management, and their impact on occupational performance.

OT 440 Applied Treatment in Pediatrics

Credits:  4 \ 1
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  OT 314, OT 371
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Presents techniques used by occupational therapists in pediatrics. Includes one week of full-time Level I fieldwork, as well as a lab.

OT 450 Prosthetics and Orthotics

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Examines the knowledge and skills required for manufacturing splints and orthotic devices, and for fitting and operating orthoses and prostheses.

 

Updated: Apr 13, 2006 12:20:35 PM