Physics

Department of Physics

College of Arts and Sciences
239 Fronczak Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-1500

Phone: 716.645.2017
Fax: 716.645.2507
Web: www.physics.buffalo.edu

Francis Gasparini
Chair
fmg@buffalo.edu

Michael G. Fuda
Director of Undergraduate Studies
fuda@buffalo.edu

About the Program

Physics is the fundamental science underlying the investigation of all natural phenomena. It has provided much of the theory and many of the experimental techniques that are widely used in present-day science and technology. The impressive list of developments that have come directly from physics includes: solid-state electronics; lasers and masers; the nuclear magnetic resonance techniques used in biology, chemistry, and medicine; X-ray crystallography; electron microscopy; and superconductivity.

Physics has also provided a stimulus to philosophy and to the general development of the ideas that seek to explain our relation to the rest of the universe.

Degree Options

The Department of Physics offers a BS, a BA, and a minor in physics. There are also several interdisciplinary programs: two BA�s in the teaching of science, a BS in computational physics, a five year BS in computational physics/MS in physics, a BS in mathematical physics, and a BS in engineering physics (see individual entries for engineering physics and for computational physics in this catalog).

The BS in physics is designed for the student considering a professional career as a physicist. This degree is strongly recommended for students planning to continue their education in graduate school at the MS or PhD level. It is also recommended for students who wish to obtain industrial or government employment in research and development.

The BA in physics is designed for students who are interested in physics, but wish to have a broader education in their undergraduate years. Students who complete this program have enough background to go on to graduate school in physics, but the program is more appropriate for students who wish to continue in such areas as geophysics, biophysics, science and public policy, and high school teaching.

The minor in physics provides a good secondary area of concentration for all students in science and engineering, as well as students in such programs as philosophy, history, and the arts.

The BA�s in the teaching of science provide enough background in physics and mathematics, and possibly chemistry, to make it possible to do an outstanding job of teaching physics, or physics and chemistry, at the high school level. It is not appropriate for students who wish to do graduate work in physics; however, it is appropriate for graduate work in education.

The BS degrees in computational physics, mathematical physics, and engineering physics are jointly administered programs. The computational physics program is offered jointly by the Department of Physics and the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. This degree makes it possible to pursue a number of career options, including research in traditional areas of physics with an emphasis on computation, educational software development, and distance learning technology. Also available is a 5-year-combined BS in Computational Physics/MS in Physics degree program. This program includes an undergraduate emphasis on computational physics plus graduate coursework in physics, resulting in a combined BS/MS.

The Mathematical Physics program is co-administered by the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Physics. It is designed for students who wish to pursue careers in applied mathematics or theoretical physics.

The Engineering Physics program is co-administered by the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Physics. It is designed for students whose interests center on the more fundamental areas of engineering and physics, but who also seek additional contact with applied aspects of these subjects. The Engineering Physics program is an appropriate course of study for students whose career objectives are in applied physics, physical electronics, solid-state electronics, electrical metrology, laser physics, and related fields. Graduates of the Engineering Physics program can pursue an advanced degree in applied physics or electrical engineering.

Acceptance Information

It is necessary to apply for acceptance into any of the above programs. The acceptance criteria for students who have completed the relevant coursework at UB are given with the summaries for each degree program. In general, it is possible to apply for any of the programs in the sophomore year. The undergraduate director, Professor Fuda, should be contacted for acceptance into any of the degree programs except for the BS in engineering physics, which is administered by the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Advisement

For general information about the programs in physics, students should consult with the undergraduate director for physics, Professor Michael G. Fuda, 333 Fronczak Hall, (716) 645-2017, ext. 192, e-mail: fuda@buffalo.edu.

Transfer Policy

1. Transfer students from accredited institutions are granted admission to the Department of Physics if they satisfy the following requirements with a minimum overall GPA of 2.0:
a. one-year calculus-based physics course similar to PHY 107-PHY 108/PHY 158
b. one-year calculus course similar to MTH 141-MTH 142
2. For transfer students with more than the minimum coursework listed in (1) above, admission is granted if the student has a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all physics and mathematics courses previously attempted.
3. Academic transfer credit is granted for physics and mathematics courses completed with a grade of C or better that are suitable to the department�s degree programs.

Honors, Awards, and Scholarships

To graduate with departmental honors, a student must excel in coursework and complete a senior thesis. The designations given below are awarded to students who have the corresponding GPAs in courses required for the Department of Physics degree programs and who have completed a senior thesis:

Distinction 3.25
High honors 3.50
Highest honors 3.75

The senior thesis is prepared under the supervision of a physics faculty member. Credit for this is obtained through PHY 497 Honors Program. The thesis is reviewed by the Undergraduate Studies Committee.

The department offers Sekula Scholarships for students with outstanding academic records.

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research and Practical Experience

Most of the department's faculty are willing to engage undergraduate students in their research activities. Interested students should visit http://www.physics.buffalo.edu/undergraduate/UndergraduateResearchMentors.htm. This web page describes the undergraduate research mentors program of the physics department. Students earn credit for their undergraduate research in PHY 498 Undergraduate Reasearch.

Physics - B.S.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 in the prerequisite courses.

Prerequisite Courses

MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
PHY 107 General Physics I or PHY 117 Honors Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II or PHY 118 Honors Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab

Required Courses

CHE 101 General Chemistry
CHE 102 General Chemistry
MTH 241 College Calculus III
MTH 306 Introduction to Differential Equations
MTH 417 Survey of Multivariable Calculus
MTH 418 Survey of Partial Differential Equations
PHY 207 General Physics III or PHY 217 Honors Physics III
PHY 208 General Physics IV
PHY 257 General Physics III Lab
PHY 301 Intermediate Mechanics I
PHY 302 Intermediate Mechanics II
PHY 307 Modern Physics Lab
PHY 401 Modern Physics I
PHY 402 Modern Physics II
PHY 403 Electricity and Magnetism I
PHY 404 Electricity and Magnetism II
PHY 405 Thermal and Statistical Physics I
PHY 406 Thermal and Statistical Physics II
PHY 407 Advanced Laboratory
PHY 408 Advanced Laboratory
One PHY elective (one of the following: PHY 310 Intermediate Optics, PHY 410 Computational Physics I, PHY 412 Nuclear and Particle Physics, PHY 413 Electronics)

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major: 85

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�CHE 101, MTH 141
Spring�CHE 102, MTH 142; PHY 107 or PHY 117

SECOND YEAR
Fall�MTH 241; PHY 108 or PHY 118; PHY 158
Spring�MTH 306; PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257

THIRD YEAR
Fall�MTH 417, PHY 301, PHY 307, PHY 401
Spring�MTH 418, PHY 302, PHY 402

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�PHY 403, PHY 405, PHY 407
Spring�PHY 404, PHY 406, PHY 408
Fall or Spring�One PHY elective

Mathematical Physics - B.S.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.5 in the prerequisite courses.

Advising Notes

Students should consult with the undergraduate director in each department regarding approved electives.

This is a joint program. A student who follows this program but does not complete it will have difficulty completing a math major without substantial additional coursework.

Prerequisite Courses

MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
PHY 107 General Physics I or PHY 117 Honors Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II or PHY 118 Honors Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab

Required Courses

MTH 241 College Calculus III
MTH 306 Introduction to Differential Equations
MTH 309 Introductory Linear Algebra
MTH 417 Survey of Multivariable Calculus
MTH 418 Survey of Partial Differential Equations
MTH 419 Introduction to Algebra I or MTH 420 Introduction to Algebra II
MTH 424 Fourier Series
MTH 425 Introduction to Complex Variables I
PHY 207 General Physics III or PHY 217 Honors Physics III
PHY 208 General Physics IV
PHY 257 General Physics III Lab
PHY 301 Intermediate Mechanics I
PHY 307 Modern Physics Lab
PHY 401 Modern Physics I
PHY 403 Electricity and Magnetism I
PHY 405 Thermal and Statistical Physics I
PHY 407 Advanced Laboratory or PHY 408 Advanced Laboratory
One 300/400-level MTH elective
One PHY elective (one of the following: PHY 302 Intermediate Mechanics II, PHY 402 Modern Physics II, PHY 404 Electricity and Magnetism II, or PHY 406 Thermal and Statistical Physics II)

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major: 81

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�MTH 141
Spring�MTH 142; PHY 107 or PHY 117

SECOND YEAR
Fall�MTH 241; PHY 108 or PHY 118; PHY 158
Spring�MTH 306, MTH 309; PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257

THIRD YEAR
Fall�MTH 417, PHY 301, PHY 307, PHY 401
Spring�MTH 418, one PHY elective

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�MTH 419 or MTH 420; MTH 425, PHY 403, PHY 405
Spring�MTH 424; PHY 407 or PHY 408; one 300/400-level MTH elective

Physics - B.A.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 in the prerequisite courses.

Prerequisite Courses

MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
PHY 107 General Physics I or PHY 117 Honors Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II or PHY 118 Honors Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab

Required Courses

CHE 101 General Chemistry
CHE 102 General Chemistry
MTH 241 College Calculus III
MTH 306 Introduction to Differential Equations
PHY 207 General Physics III or PHY 217 Honors Physics III
PHY 208 General Physics IV
PHY 257 General Physics III Lab
PHY 301 Intermediate Mechanics I
PHY 307 Modern Physics Lab
PHY 401 Modern Physics I
PHY 402 Modern Physics II
PHY 403 Electricity and Magnetism I
PHY 405 Thermal and Statistical Physics I
PHY 407 Advanced Laboratory or PHY 408 Advanced Laboratory
Two PHY electives (choose from PHY 302 Intermediate Mechanics II, PHY 310 Intermediate Optics, PHY 404 Electricity and Magnetism II, PHY 410 Computational Physics I, PHY 413 Electronics)
One additional 300/400-level PHY course (excluding PHY 499)

Summary
Total required credit hours for this major: 72

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�CHE 101, MTH 141
Spring� CHE 102, MTH 142; PHY 107 or PHY 117

SECOND YEAR
Fall� MTH 241; PHY 108 or PHY 118; PHY 158
Spring� MTH 306; PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257

THIRD YEAR
Fall�PHY 301, PHY 307, PHY 401
Spring�PHY 402, one 300/400-level PHY course (excluding PHY 499)

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�PHY 403, PHY 405
Spring�PHY 407 or PHY 408; two PHY electives

Physics-Teaching of Science Program - B.A.

About the Programs

Students pursuing this program must also pursue the Undergraduate Minor in Education, which is administered by the Teacher Education Institute (TEI). Applications to the minor must be filed with the TEI office in 375 Baldy Hall. Applications must include a UB DARS report and/or official transcripts from all other institutions attended other than UB.

These concentrations are designed for the student whose career goal is to attain a master's degree for Professional certification in science education. Students interested in this concentration should obtain advisement from the director of undergraduate studies in physics and, for questions related to the education courses, from the TEI office.

Completion of the major concentration (including the required education courses) provides advanced status toward Initial New York State teacher certification, accomplished through one year of subsequent coursework at the graduate level through the Graduate School of Education. It is then possible to complete, within the state-mandated three years, the master's degree required for a Professional teaching certificate, provided all New York State requirements have been successfully completed.

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 in the prerequisite courses. TEI requires a minimum GPA of 2.5 overall for admission.

Teaching of Science - Physics

Prerequisite Courses
MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
PHY 107 General Physics I or PHY 117 Honors Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II or PHY 118 Honors Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab

Required Courses
CHE 101 General Chemistry
CHE 102 General Chemistry
MTH 241 College Calculus III
MTH 306 Introduction to Differential Equations
PHY 207 General Physics III or PHY 217 Honors Physics III
PHY 208 General Physics IV
PHY 257 General Physics III Lab
PHY 307 Modern Physics Lab
Four 300/400-level PHY electives (excluding PHY 499)

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major: 57

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�CHE 101, MTH 141
Spring� CHE 102, MTH 142; PHY 107 or PHY 117

SECOND YEAR
Fall� MTH 241; PHY 108 or PHY 118; PHY 158
Spring� MTH 306; PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257

THIRD YEAR
Fall� PHY 307, one 300/400-level PHY elective (excluding PHY 499)
Spring�One 300/400-level PHY electives (excluding PHY 499)

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�One 300�level elective (excluding PHY 499)
Spring� One 300-level elective (excluding PHY 499)

Teaching of Science - Physics and Chemistry

Prerequisite Courses
MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
PHY 107 General Physics I or PHY 117 Honors Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II or PHY 118 Honors Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab

Required Courses
CHE 101 General Chemistry
CHE 102 General Chemistry
CHE 201 Organic Chemistry
CHE 202 Organic Chemistry
CHE 214 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry
MTH 241 College Calculus III
MTH 306 Introduction to Differential Equations
PHY 207 General Physics III or PHY 217 Honors Physics III
PHY 208 General Physics IV
PHY 257 General Physics III Lab
PHY 307 Modern Physics Lab
Two 300/400-level PHY electives (excluding PHY 499)

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major: 64

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�CHE 101, MTH 141
Spring� CHE 102, MTH 142; PHY 107 or PHY 117

SECOND YEAR
Fall� MTH 241; PHY 108 or PHY 118; PHY 158
Spring� MTH 306; PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257

THIRD YEAR
Fall�CHE 201, CHE 214, PHY 307
Spring�CHE 202

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�One 300/400-level PHY elective (excluding PHY 499)
Spring�One 300/400-level PHY elective (excluding PHY 499)

Computational Physics - B.S./M.S.

About the Program

This interdisciplinary program is offered jointly by the Departments of Physics (PHY) and Computer Science and Engineering (CSE). For further information, see the Computational Physics entry.

Engineering Physics - B.S.

About the Program

This interdisciplinary program is offered jointly by the Departments of Physics (PHY) and Electrical Engineering (EE). For further information, see the Engineering Physics entry.

Physics - Minor

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 in the prerequisite courses.

Prerequisite Courses

MTH 141 College Calculus I
MTH 142 College Calculus II
PHY 107 General Physics I or PHY 117 Honors Physics I
PHY 108 General Physics II or PHY 118 Honors Physics II
PHY 158 General Physics II Lab

Required Courses

PHY 207 General Physics III or PHY 217 Honors Physics III (lab is not required)
PHY 208 General Physics IV (lab is not required)
PHY 301 Intermediate Mechanics I
PHY 403 Electricity and Magnetism I
One 300/400-level PHY elective course (excluding PHY 499; PHY 401 Modern Physics I is strongly recommended)

Summary
Total required credit hours for the minor: 33

Course Descriptions

PHY 100 Introduction to Physics

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Preparation for PHY 107-PHY 108 or PHY 101-PHY 102. Covers mostly Newtonian mechanics, emphasizing problem solving and math skills useful for physics. Reviews algebra, geometry, and trigonometry as applied to physics.

PHY 101 College Physics

Credits:  4
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  PHY 151
Type:  LEC/REC

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Presents non-calculus, introductory physics, including mechanics, heat, waves, and sound.

PHY 102 College Physics II

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 101
Corequisites:  PHY 152
Type:  LEC/REC

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Presents non-calculus, introductory physics, including electricity and magnetism, light, optics, and modern physics.

PHY 107 General Physics I

Credits:  4
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  MTH 141
Type:  LEC/REC

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A calculus-based introductory course primarily for chemistry, engineering, and physics majors. Covers kinematics, Newton's laws, energy, momentum, rotational motion, and oscillations.

PHY 108 General Physics II

Credits:  4
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107
Corequisites:  MTH 142, PHY 158
Type:  LEC/REC

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A calculus-based introductory course primarily for chemistry, engineering, and physics majors. Covers the electric field, Gauss' law, electric potential, capacitance, DC circuits, RC circuits, magnetic field, Faraday's law, inductance, LR circuits, AC circuits, and Maxwell�s equations.

PHY 115 Relativity Seminar for Nonspecialists

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Examines philosophies of space and time, Mach�s principle and the role of inertia, curved space-time, unified field theory (Faraday to Einstein), and implications of extension in all domains.

PHY 116 Philosophy of Physics

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Studies views of space, time, and matter in the ancient world; European post-Renaissance, nineteenth-century ideas and discoveries; wave-particle dualism; wave mechanics; Copenhagen school; theory of relativity; and problems of matter, radiation, and cosmology.

PHY 117 Honors Physics I

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  MTH 141
Type:  LEC/REC

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Covers the same topics as PHY 107, but in greater depth. Class size is limited. In general, taken by students in the University Honors Program, but other students may take it with permission of instructor.

PHY 118 Honors Physics II

Credits:  4
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PHY 107 or PHY 117
Corequisites:  MTH 142, PHY 158
Type:  LEC/REC

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Covers the same topics as PHY 108, but in greater depth. Class size is limited. In general, taken by students in the University Honors Program, but other students may take it with permission of instructor.

PHY 119 How Things Work

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Describes working principles of devices used in everyday life, such as the video recorder, fax machine, and television. Reviews the history of discoveries that made each device possible, as well as development of the device. Explores the consequences of particular devices in society. Suitable for non-science majors, but science and engineering majors are expected to greatly benefit from it also.

PHY 121 Descriptive Astronomy I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Introduces astronomy, astronomical instrumentation, the birth and evolution of stars, black holes, constellations and the night sky, covering scales in the universe, the history of astronomy from ancient times to the present, neutron stars, spectroscopy, and white dwarfs.

PHY 122 Descriptive Astronomy II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 121
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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A continuation of PHY 121. Covers the Milky Way galaxy, othe galaxies in the universe, cosmology and the origin of the universe, the formation of the solar system, earthlike planets, planets of the outer solar system, meteorites, asteroids, and comets. Course themes concentrate on origins: How did the universe begin? What was the origin of the earth? How did life begin?

PHY 151 College Physics I Lab

Credits:  1
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  PHY 101
Type:  LAB

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Studies heat, mechanics, sound, and waves.

PHY 152 College Physics II Lab

Credits:  1
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  PHY 102
Type:  LAB

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Studies electricity and magnetism, light, optics, and modern physics.

PHY 158 General Physics II Lab

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107
Corequisites:  PHY 108
Type:  LAB

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Conducts experiments on mechanics, as well as electricity and magnetism.

PHY 207 General Physics III

Credits:  4
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107-PHY 108
Corequisites:  MTH 241
Type:  LEC

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Examines sound waves, electromagnetic waves, and geometrical and physical optics. Introduces modern physics, including discovery of the electron, the photon, wave-particle duality, the Bohr model of H-atom, the Schr�dinger equation, quantum numbers, the Pauli principle and periodic table, and lasers.

PHY 208 General Physics IV

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107, PHY 108
Corequisites:  MTH 306
Type:  LEC

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Examines thermodynamics, including temperature, zeroth law, thermal expansion, specific heat, first law, second law, entropy, third law, kinetic theory, Brownian motion, and the ideal gas. Also explores special relativity, including historical background, Lorentz transformations, length contraction, time dilation, invariance of the laws of physics, relativistic dynamics and kinematics, and paradoxes.

PHY 217 Honors Physics III

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107 and PHY 108, or PHY 117 and PHY 118
Corequisites:  MTH 241
Type:  LEC

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Covers the same topics as PHY 207, but in greater depth. Class size is limited. In general, taken by students in the University Honors Program, but other students may take it with permission of instructor.

PHY 257 General Physics III Lab

Credits:  1
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107 and PHY 108/PHY 158, or PHY 117 and PHY 118/PHY 158
Corequisites:  PHY 207
Type:  LAB

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Conducts experiments on waves, geometrical and physical optics, and modern physics.

PHY 286 Maple in Physics

Credits:  1
Semester:
Prerequisites:  PHY 107-PHY 108
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Introduces basic syntax and capabilities of this computer calculus/algebra system as applied to obtain analytical solutions to problems in physics. Students taking PHY 386 learn the same syntax as PHY 286 students, but are required to do more advanced problems such as occur in junior-senior physics courses. A student may receive academic credit for only one of the two courses.

PHY 301 Intermediate Mechanics I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PHY 107 and MTH 306
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Vectors, Newtonian mechanics: rectilinear motion of a particle, general motion of a particle in three dimensions, oscillations, Hamilton's variational principle: derivation of Lagrange's equations and Hamilton's equations with simple applications , equivalence to Newtonian dynamics, forces of constraint and the Lagrange multiplier method, generalized forces, noninertial reference systems, gravitation and central forces.

PHY 302 Intermediate Mechanics II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 301
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Whenever feasible, the Lagrangian method will be applied. Dynamics of systems of particles, mechanics of rigid bodies: planar motion, motion of rigid bodies in three dimensions, dynamics of oscillating systems.

PHY 307 Modern Physics Lab

Credits:  2
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Conducts experiments in thermodynamics and modern physics.

PHY 310 Intermediate Optics

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 207 or PHY 217
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Examines geometrical and physical optics. Explores diffraction, interference, polarization, and other wave properties of light; and the quantum nature of light and lasers.

PHY 311 Applied Acoustics of Music

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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A general, practical course. Covers the nature of sound; the ear and the hearing process; consonance and dissonance; scales and harmonic series; basic physics of musical instruments; high fidelity systems; and theatre, studio, and room acoustics.

PHY 386 Maple in Physics

Credits:  1
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 107, PHY 108, PHY 207, PHY 208, and junior standing
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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Introduces basic syntax and capabilities of the computer calculus/algebra system as applied to obtain analytical solutions to problems in physics. Students taking PHY 386 learn the same syntax as PHY 286 students, but are required to do more advanced problems such as occur in junior-senior physics courses. A student may receive academic credit for only one of the two courses.

PHY 401 Modern Physics I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  MTH 306, PHY 207, PHY 208
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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It is strongly recommended that physics majors take PHY 401-PHY 402 in the junior year, as these courses provide the necessary background for PHY 406, PHY 407-PHY 408, PHY 410-PHY 411, PHY 412, and PHY 527-PHY 528.

Origins of quantum theory, wave function and the uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation, one-dimensional examples, formalism of quantum mechanics.

PHY 402 Modern Physics II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 401
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Angular momentum, three-dimensional problems, hydrogen atom, time-independant perturbation theory, electron spin and fine structure, time-dependent perturbation theory, quantum statistics.

PHY 403 Electricity and Magnetism I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  MTH 241, MTH 306, PHY 108
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Examines vector calculus, Gauss� law, scalar and vector potentials, Laplace and Poisson�s equations, dielectrics, electrostatic and magnetostatic fields, Ampere�s law, Faraday�s law, and Maxwell�s equations.

PHY 404 Electricity and Magnetism II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 403
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Undertakes further study of Maxwell�s equations, electric and magnetic susceptibilities, electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic fields from a moving charge, waveguides and transmission lines, Poynting�s vector, and Lorentz force. Also examines relativistic invariance.

PHY 405 Thermal and Statistical Physics I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  MTH 306, PHY 208, PHY 301
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Explores statistics and statistical description of particles; statistical and macroscopic thermodynamics; basic results of classical statistical mechanics and connections with thermodynamics; microcanonical, canonical, and grand canonical ensembles; applications to ideal gases, paramagnets, and lattice vibrations; kinetic theory; and phase equilibrium of one-component systems.

PHY 406 Thermal and Statistical Physics II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 401, PHY 405
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Covers quantum statistics of ideal Bose and Fermi systems, applications to electrons in metals, blackbody radiation, Bose condensation, neutron stars, interacting systems, lattice vibrations, nonideal gases, ferromagnets, kinetic theory of transport processes, irreversible processes, and fluctuations.

PHY 407 Advanced Laboratory

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257, PHY 307, PHY 401
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Covers modern physics, with a choice of experiments: atomic physics, modern laser optics, solid state, magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, nuclear, or particle physics. Two four-hour labs each week.

PHY 408 Advanced Laboratory

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 208, PHY 257, PHY 307, PHY 401
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Covers modern physics, with a choice of experiments: atomic physics, modern laser optics, solid state, magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction, scanning probe microscopy, nuclear, or particle physics. Two four-hour labs each week.

PHY 410 Computational Physics I

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  PHY 207 or PHY 217; PHY 401
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Examines numerical solutions of problems in dynamics, electrodynamics, and quantum and statistical physics. Also examines root-finding, numerical differentiation, quadrature, matrix inversion, and ordinary differential equations. Studies structured programming in FORTRAN 90, C++, or Java; and explores Computer graphics.

PHY 411 Computational Physics II

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 410
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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More advanced physics problems involving partial differential equations. Numerical simulation and Monte Carlo methods, data analysis and fast Fourier transforms, use of mathematical library routines and computer algebra programs.

PHY 412 Nuclear and Particle Physics

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 401
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Explores fundamentals of nuclear physics, including interaction of radiation with matter; properties of nuclear forces; nuclear structure described by shell and collective models; nuclear reactions; radioactive decay processes; and properties of elementary particles.

PHY 413 Electronics

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  PHY 108 or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/LAB

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Introduces basic concepts of circuit design, impedance, and feedback systems; solid-state components; integrated circuits; digital circuits; and basic instrumentation.

PHY 414 Experimental Techniques

Credits:  2 - 3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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Involves individual work with faculty in a research laboratory.

PHY 415 Experimental Techniques

Credits:  2 - 3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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Involves individual work with faculty in a research laboratory.

PHY 480 Special Topics in Physics

Credits:  1 - 3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Topics of interest that are not regularly covered in other courses.

PHY 497 Honors

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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For students who wish to do a senior thesis. Consult the undergraduate director, Professor Fuda, for details.

PHY 498 Undergraduate Research

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Allows students to earn credit for research activities under the direction of a physics faculty member.

PHY 499 Independent Study in Physics

Credits:  1 - 4
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Involves individual study arranged between a student and a faculty member. Not restricted to students with professional goals in technical areas.

Updated: Aug 24, 2006 11:50:26 AM