Social Sciences Interdisciplinary

Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs

203 Clemens Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260-4670

Phone: 716.645.2245
Fax: 716.645.3640
Web: cas.buffalo.edu/programs/idp/ugrad/

Lee Dryden
Director

About the Program

Some of the major problems society faces today can be grasped fully only by integrating the specializations of different academic disciplines. The Interdisciplinary Degree Programs in the Social Sciences offer students an opportunity to focus on a particular thematic area of interdisciplinary studies whose breadth and diversity overlaps several departments. Departmental courses are organized in curricula administered by the Interdisciplinary Degree Programs in the Social Sciences.

The degree consists of courses taught by the faculty of departments throughout the university. Each program is designed to offer choice and flexibility in building the program most suitable for individual interests and career goals. Hundreds of students have graduated from the programs in recent years.

Within our BA and BS programs, the following concentrations are offered:

Cognitive Science. Cognitive Science is an interdisciplinary approach to how the mind works. It investigates thought and consciousness, the senses and emotions, the structure of language, cultural patterns, neural organization, and computational analogs of mental processes. It examines how these areas interact, how they develop in the growing human, and how they appear in animals.

Environmental Studies. The Environmental Studies BA or BS degree offers an opportunity for students to study social science and natural science disciplines related to the environment. Field courses and an internship are required. The BS adds environmental chemistry, ecological methods and spatial analysis. Specialty tracks provide a body of course work and experiences that prepare a student for a defined area within the field of environmental studies. The Environmental Studies Program maintains a list of preapproved specialty tracks and accepts petitions for individualized programs.

Health and Human Services (Social Gerontology, Community Mental Health, and Early Childhood Studies). Health and Human Services studies the social systems delivering human services to individuals and communities in need, the problems affecting those individuals and communities, and the professions and professionals providing services.

International Studies. The International Studies program provides a general background useful for graduate studies or a number of career fields with international involvement. The three tiers of the curriculum beyond the prerequisite level are based on:
1. The belief that significant language competence is fundamental to the international field of inquiry/activity
2. The assumption that students in the field should be exposed to a range of disciplinary approaches
3. The desirability of pursuing some focused interest in a particular geographic area

Legal Studies. The Legal Studies concentration is designed for students who are interested in studying the law, legal processes, legal institutions, and the role of law in society. The program offers a multidisciplinary perspective on the law in its social and political context, and as a means of social change. This major provides a background for careers in government, law enforcement, social work, and professional training in law school.

Urban and Public Policy Studies. This program provides a general academic introduction to the fields of urban and public policy studies. It may prove useful to, but is not specifically designed for, those students who are anticipating graduate work in urban planning or an associated field, or who are seeking employment opportunities in politics or public or private agencies.

Degree Options

Bachelor of Arts. Students may complete a B.A. in the following concentrations: Cognitive Science, Environmental Studies, Health and Human Services, International Studies, Legal Studies, or Urban and Public Policy.

Bachelor of Science. Students may complete a BS in the Environmental Studies concentration.

Combined BA/MSW Degree Program. The Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Degree Programs (IDP) and the Graduate School of Social Work have developed a combined degree between IDP�s major in health and human service and the MSW in social work. It is a five-year program of undergraduate and graduate coursework leading to the combined BA/MSW degree.

Students complete their first three years of undergraduate work in the IDP. Their fourth and fifth years are completed in the UB School of Social Work. The degree consists of 93 undergraduate credit hours and 60 graduate credit hours.

Students must complete eleven of the fifteen courses normally required for the major in health and human services. In addition, they must complete their undergraduate general education requirements. Students should see IDP program advisors for specific curriculum planning.

Acceptance to IDP�s health and human services major does not assure admission to the BA/MSW degree program. Admission to the program is competitive. Students should apply for admission to the School of Social Work at the beginning of the second semester of the junior year to be admitted to the BA/MSW program for the following fall. BA/MSW applicants are not required to take the GREs. The application deadline for Social Work is March 1; February 1 if students wish to apply for graduate assistantships. Applications and further information can be obtained from Social Work�s admissions office in 685 Baldy Hall.

Experience (e.g. volunteer, fieldwork, employment) in a social service setting is strongly encouraged for applicants to the BA/MSW programs.

For more information contact Dr. Lee Dryden, Director of the Interdisciplinary Degree Programs, at (716) 645-2245, ext. 2.

Double Majors. A double major may be completed in one of the interdisciplinary degree programs� concentrations along with a major in another department; only two of the departmental major courses may be counted toward the upper division of the interdisciplinary degree major concentration. Students cannot combine two interdisciplinary degree programs concentrations.

Joint Majors. Joint majors are not accepted.

Double Degrees. A double degree may be completed in one of the interdisciplinary degree programs� concentrations along with a major in another department. There are a very limited number of courses that may be used towards both majors so students must meet with an advisor in each major area before beginning a double degree, and regularly during completion of the program.

Acceptance Information

Students should apply for admission to the major in the Interdisciplinary Degree Programs in the Social Sciences no later than the beginning of their junior year. Students are expected to follow major requirements as listed in the catalog for the academic year during which they are admitted to the major. To be eligible for admission to all programs except cognitive science, students are required to attain a grade of C or better in all prerequisite courses and to have a minimum UB GPA of 2.0. To be admitted to cognitive science, students are required to attain a grade of B- or better in the prerequisite course and to have a minimum UB GPA of 2.0.

Advisement

All majors are administered by the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs, College of Arts and Sciences. This office coordinates admission to each of the majors and advises students toward completion of the degree. There is at least one advisor for each concentration within the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs.

Academic Requirements

Students in the Cognitive Science program must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 in the major. Students in all other concentrations must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the major. All students must maintain a minimum UB GPA of 2.0 overall, as well as a minimum GPA of 2.0 for the most recently completed semester. Students must continue to complete more than 75 percent of the credit hours for which they register.

In addition, students must complete all courses to be applied toward the major, beyond the level of pre-requisite courses, with a grade of C- or better. Exception: No more than one D or D+ grade is applied toward the major. This exception in no way alters the requirements of obtaining a C grade or better in prerequisite courses for admission to the major.

Transfer Policy

Transfer students must first apply to the university and meet the university�s transfer admission GPA requirements. Applications are then forwarded to the IDP office for review and course equivalency evaluation. Newly admitted transfer students who have completed the prerequisite requirements or have completed 60 or more credit hours at the school from which they have transferred are accepted to the major on a provisional basis, with full admission dependent upon completion of prerequisite requirements and attaining a minimum UB GPA of 2.0 within a specified time frame.

Courses from two-year colleges cannot be used toward fulfillment of the advanced-level course requirements in any of the interdisciplinary programs. At least 50 percent of coursework toward the major must be completed at UB.

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research and Practical Experience

The Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs offers internship opportunities in human services, legal studies, and environmental studies. All are structured so that students are provided with the opportunity to observe the practical workings of some aspect of their chosen major. The internships also allow students to become aware of the individuals, agencies, and associations working within their area of study and to begin to understand the roles and responsibilities of a professional in their field.

Career Opportunities/Further Study

Interdisciplinary graduates frequently establish careers in human services, legal assistance, public administration, and environmental consulting. The degree is also excellent preparation for professional training in social work, law, education, counseling, and graduate study leading to master�s and doctoral degrees.

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - B.A.

Concentration in Cognitive Science

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Completion of prerequisite course with a grade of B- or better.

Advising Notes

Each course taken may be counted only once and applied toward only one requirement (e.g., CSE 463 may be applied to the contents courses, or to the focus area, but not to both).

Prerequisite Courses

PSY 342 Introduction to Cognitive Science: Concepts of the Mind (offered fall only)

Required Courses

SSC 391 Cognitive Science Colloquium (this course involves attending at least 75 percent of the Cognitive Science Colloquia during each term SSC 391 is taken; the course should be taken three times; SSC 391 is graded P/F)
Three methods courses
Three content courses
Six courses in a single focus area

Senior thesis option: Students may optionally write a senior thesis, based on original research done in collaboration with their cognitive science advisor. Students choosing the senior thesis option are required to take five courses in a single focus area as opposed to the six required for students not selecting the thesis option.

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major (cognitive science): 42-49

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�PSY 101 (prerequisite for PSY 342)
Spring�One methods or content course

SECOND YEAR
Fall�PSY 342, two methods or content courses
Spring�One methods or content course; one focus area course

THIRD YEAR
Fall�SSC 391, one methods or content course, one focus area course
Spring�SSC 391, one methods or content course, one focus area course

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�Two focus area courses
Spring�SSC 391, one focus area course

Electives and Course Groupings

Methods Courses

APY 320 Seminar in Cognitive Anthropology
CSE 113-CSE 114 Introduction to Computer Science I-II or CSE 115-CSE 116 Introduction to Computer Science for Majors I-II
PHI 215 Introduction to Deductive Logic or PHI 315 Symbolic Logic
PSY 207 Psychological Statistics
PSY 250 Scientific Inquiry in Psychology

Content Courses

APY 106 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
CSE 463 Introduction to Knowledge Representation and Reasoning or CSE 467/LIN 467 Computational Linguistics or CSE 472 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
LIN 205 Introduction to Linguistic Analysis or LIN 207 Language, Society, and the Individual
PHI 108 Knowledge and Reality or PHI 221 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science
PSY 341 Cognitive Psychology or PSY 351 Biopsychology

Focus Area Courses

Most courses in these areas have at least one prerequisite requirement. Students should check individual course entries in the catalog or speak with the cognitive science advisor.

COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
APY 344 Animal Communication
APY 457 Evolutionary Biology of Humans
CDS 301 Language Development in Children
CDS 302 Language Disorders in Children
CSE 474 Introduction to Machine Learning
LIN 320 Language and the Brain
LIN 355 Child Language Development
LIN 455 Language Acquisition
NUR 250 Human Growth and Development
PGY 424 Developmental Neurobiology
PSY 336 Developmental Psychology
PSY 427 Adult Development and Aging
PSY 428 Language Development
PSY 430 Evolutionary Psychology
PSY 446 Animal Cognition
PSY 448 Psycholinguistics
PSY 457 Cognitive Development

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING
CSE 202 Programming in Lisp
CSE 463 Introduction to Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CSE 467/LIN 467 Computational Linguistics
CSE 472 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
CSE 473 Introduction to Computer Vision
CSE 474 Introduction to Machine Learning
IE 323 Ergonomics
IE 435 Human-Computer Interaction
LIN 438 Semantics
LIN 443 Semantics II
LIN 448 Formal Semantics
MTH 309 Introductory Linear Algebra
MTH 314 Logic for Computer Science
MTH 455 Mathematical Modeling
MTH 460 Theory of Games
PHI 415 Logical Theory I
PHI 416 Logical Theory II
PHI 417 Modal Logic
PSY 343 Sensory Processes and Perception

HIGH-LEVEL MENTAL PROCESSES
APY 246 Introduction to Primate Behavior
APY 276 Introduction to Ethnomedicine
APY 320 Seminar in Cognitive Anthropology
APY 344 Animal Communication
APY 377 Magic, Sorcery, and Witchcraft
APY 380 Myth, Ritual, Symbolism
CSE 202 Programming in Lisp
CSE 463 Introduction to Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CSE 467/LIN 467 Computational Linguistics
CSE 472 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
CSE 474 Introduction to Machine Learning
GEO 102 Introduction to Human Geography
GEO 485 Cartography and Geographic Visualization
LIN 356 An Introduction to Contemporary Theories of Metaphor
LIN 404 Discourse-Pragmatics
LIN 413 Language and Cognition
LIN 417 Psycholinguistics
LIN 421 Language and Culture
LIN 438 Semantics
LIN 481 Cognitive Foundations of Language
PHI 315 Symbolic Logic
PHI 329 Metaphysics
PHI 333 Epistemology
PHI 345 Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art
PHI 370 Early Modern Philosophy
PSY 416 Reasoning and Problem Solving
PSY 445 Memory
PSY 446 Animal Cognition
PSY 447 The Psychology of Music
PSY 448 Psycholinguistics
PSY 457 Cognitive Development

LANGUAGE
APY 344 Animal Communication
CDS 286 Phonetics
CDS 301 Language Development in Children
CSE 202 Programming in Lisp
CSE 396 Introduction to the Theory of Computation
CSE 463 Introduction to Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CSE 467/LIN 467 Computational Linguistics
CSE 472 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
LIN 205 Introduction to Linguistic Analysis
LIN 207 Language, Society, and the Individual
LIN 301 Structure of English: The Sound System
LIN 302 Structure of English: Grammar and Lexicon
LIN 320 Language and the Brain
LIN 355 Child Language Development
LIN 356 An Introduction to Contemporary Theories of Metaphor
LIN 404 Discourse-Pragmatics
LIN 405 Bilingualism and Language Contact
LIN 410 Morphology
LIN 413 Language and Cognition
LIN 415 Syntax I
LIN 417 Psycholinguistics
LIN 421 Language and Culture
LIN 425 Typology and Universals
LIN 431 Phonetics
LIN 432 Phonology I
LIN 433 Phonology II
LIN 434 Syntax II
LIN 438 Semantics
LIN 439 Historical Linguistics
LIN 443 Semantics II
LIN 448 Formal Semantics
LIN 455 Language Acquisition
LIN 481 Cognitive Foundations of Language
PHI 315 Symbolic Logic
PHI 415 Logical Theory I
PHI 416 Logical Theory II
PHI 417 Modal Logic
PSY 428 Language Development
PSY 445 Memory
PSY 448 Psycholinguistics

NEUROSCIENCES
APY 457 Evolutionary Biology of Humans
CDS 383 Anatomy and Physiology of Audition
CDS 428 Neural Basis of Communication/Lab
CSE 474 Introduction to Machine Learning
LIN 320 Language and the Brain
PGY 424 Developmental Neurobiology
PGY 427 Neurophysiology
PGY 451 Human Physiology I
PSY 343 Sensory Processes and Perception
PSY 351 Biopsychology
PSY 418 Modification and Behavioral Medicine
PSY 419 Biological Bases of Memory
PSY 426 Biological Bases of Mental Disorders
PSY 429 Psychophysiology
PSY 436 Neuropsychology
PSY 439 Biopsychology of Stress
PSY 451 Drug Addiction

SYMBOLIC SYSTEMS
CSE 202 Programming in Lisp
CSE 305 Introduction to Programming Languages
CSE 396 Introduction to the Theory of Computation
CSE 451 Program Development
CSE 463 Introduction to Knowledge Representation and Reasoning
CSE 467/LIN 467 Computational Linguistics
CSE 472 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
CSE 473 Introduction to Computer Vision and Image Processing
CSE 474 Introduction to Machine Learning
GEO 120 Maps and Mapping
GEO 381 Cartography
GEO 481 Geographic Information Systems
GEO 485 Cartography and Geographic Visualization
GEO 488 GIS Design
GEO 489 GIS Algorithms and Data Structures
IE 323 Ergonomics
IE 435 Human-Computer Interaction
LIN 415 Syntax I
LIN 434 Syntax II
LIN 438 Semantics
LIN 443 Semantics II
LIN 448 Formal Semantics
MTH 313 Elements of Set Theory
MTH 314 Logic for Computer Science
MTH 413 Introduction to Mathematical Logic I
MTH 414 Introduction to Mathematical Logic II
MTH 460 Theory of Games
PHI 315 Symbolic Logic
PHI 415 Logical Theory I
PHI 416 Logical Theory II
PHI 417 Modal Logic
PSY 405 Data Analysis Techniques
PSY 416 Reasoning and Problem Solving
PSY 445 Memory

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - B.A. B.S.

Concentration in Environmental Studies

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Completion of prerequisite course with a grade of C or better.

Advising Notes

Students originally entering the BA program may transfer applicable credits to the BS program.

Prerequisite Courses

SSC 118 Introduction to Environmental Studies

Required Courses

Three courses from social science core
Five courses for B.A. or seven courses for B.S. from natural science core
One analytical skills course*
One spatial analysis course (B.S. students only)
Five courses from the chosen specialized track
SSC 496 Environmental Internship

*It is strongly recommended that this requirement be completed by the end of the sophomore year.

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major (environmental studies BA): 51-52
Total required credit hours for the major (environmental studies BS): 59-61

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall� GEO 101 or GLY 101; SSC 118
Spring�GEO 106 or GLY 102, one social sciences core course

SECOND YEAR
Fall�BIO 200, one analytical skills course; GLY 161 (B.S. students only)
Spring�SSC 315, two social sciences core courses

THIRD YEAR
Fall�BIO 309, one specialized track course; BIO 310 (B.S. students only)
Spring�Two specialized track courses
Fall or Spring�One spatial analysis course (B.S. students only)

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�One specialized track course
Spring�One specialized track course
Fall or Spring�SSC 496

Electives and Course Groupings

Social Sciences Core
APY 120 Environmental Anthropology
PHI 334 Environmental Ethics
SSC 213 Social Research Methods or SOC 293 Social Research Methods
SSC 406 Law and the Environment

Natural Sciences Core
BIO 200 Evolutionary Biology (offered fall only)
BIO 309 Ecology (offered fall only; prerequisite: BIO 200)
BIO 310 Ecological Methods (B.S. students only; offered fall only; prerequisite: BIO 200)
GEO 101 and GEO 106 Physical Environmental Geography sequence or GLY 101-GLY 102 Global Environmental Science sequence
GLY 161 Introduction to Environmental Geochemistry (B.S. students only; offered fall only)
SSC 315 Field Ecology

Analytical Skills
PSY 207 Psychological Statistics
SOC 294 Basic Statistics for Social Sciences
SSC 225 Statistics for Social Sciences
STA 119 Statistical Methods

Spatial Analysis (B.S. students only)
GEO 481 Geographic Information Systems (offered fall only)
PD 356 Computing for Environmental Analysis (offered spring only)

Specialized Tracks

Specialized tracks provide a body of coursework and experience that prepare a student for a defined area within the field of environmental studies. Five courses in the chosen specialized track are required. The Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs maintains a list of pre-approved specialized tracks in the environmental studies curriculum and accepts petitions for individualized programs; please see the environmental studies advisor for further information.

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
PD 301 Perspectives on Land Use and Development
SOC 446 Environmental Sociology
SSC 317 Environmental Politics
SSC 326 Great Lakes Ecology
SSC 360 Environmental Impact Statements
SSC 419 Wilderness

ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES
GEO 350 Landform Field and Lab Techniques
GEO 352 Introduction to Soils
GEO 356 Forest Ecology
GEO 435 Conservation Biogeography
GEO 445 Restoration Ecology
SSC 350 Water Quality
SSC 360 Environmental Impact Statements
SSC 385 Energy, Environment and Society
SSC 493 Ecology of Unique Environments

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
ENG 211 Books of the Environment
SSC 238 Science, Religion and Nature
SSC 448 Animals, Zoos and Ecology
SSC 479 Environmental Education Practicum I (offered summer only)
SSC 480 Environmental Education Practicum II (offered summer only)
SSC 493 The Ecology of Unique Environments

ENVIRONMENTAL INTERNSHIP
SSC 496 Internship

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - B.A.

Concentration in Health and Human Services

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Completion of prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better in each.

Advising Notes

Students interested in pursuing graduate studies directed toward state certification as K-6 teachers are strongly advised to consult with an Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs advisor as soon as they begin this major. Further information about teacher certification can be obtained from the Teacher Education Institute, Graduate School of Education, 375 Baldy Hall.

Prerequisite Courses

PSY 101 Introductory Psychology
SSC 103 Introduction to Health and Human Services

Required Courses

One introductory course
Two analytical skills courses (one statistics course and one methods course)*
One biological sciences course
Three intermediate-level courses, one of which must be PHI 337 Social and Ethical Values in Medicine
Six courses from the chosen concentration area
*It is strongly recommended that this requirement be completed by the end of the sophomore year.

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major (health and human services): 45-46

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall- PSY 101, SSC 103
Spring- One introductory course, one statistics course

SECOND YEAR
Fall- One biological sciences course, one methods course
Spring- Two intermediate courses**

THIRD YEAR
Fall- One intermediate course**, one concentration area course
Spring- Two concentration area courses

FOURTH YEAR
Fall- Two concentration area courses (one of which is SSC 496 for Social Gerontology and Community Mental Health majors)
Spring- One concentration area course (SSC 496 for Social Gerontology and Community Mental Health majors )

**PHI 337 Social and Ethical Values in Medicine is a required intermediate course.

Electives and Course Groupings

Introductory Courses

APY 105 Introduction to Anthropology
APY 106 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
APY 107 Introduction to Physical Anthropology
APY 108 Introduction to Archaeology
COM 101 Principles of Communication
PHI 107 Ethics
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Analytical Skills

STATISTICS COURSES
CEP 207 Introduction to Statistics and Computing
PSY 207 Psychological Statistics
SOC 294 Basic Statistics for Social Sciences
SSC 225 Statistics for Social Sciences
STA 119 Statistical Methods

METHODS COURSES
NUR 348 Applied Scientific Inquiry in Nursing
PSY 250 Scientific Inquiry in Psychology
SOC 293 Social Research Methods
SSC 213 Social Research Methods

Intermediate Courses

PHI 337 Social and Ethical Values in Medicine (required)

Two of the following:
APY 248 Human Genetics
APY 275 Introduction to Medical Anthropology
APY 276 Introduction to Ethnomedicine
COM 202 Intercultural Communication
COM 217 Communication in Organizations
COM 223 Principles and Methods of Interviewing
COM 225 Interpersonal Communication
HIS 215 Death in America
JLS 131 The Family and the Law
LAI 205/SSC 208 Introduction to Child Development and Learning or NUR 250 Human Growth and Development
SOC 206 Social Problems
SOC 211 Sociology of Diversity
SSC 209 Case Management
SSC 210 Skill Development in Human Service
SSC 390 Human Services Administration
WS 238 Women, Work, and Family

Biological Sciences Courses

ANA 113 Human Anatomy
APY 345 Comparative Primate Anatomy and APY 346 Primate Dissections
BIO 129 Perspectives in Human Biology (strongly recommended for students pursuing the joint health and human services/School of Social Work degree; offered fall only)
BIO 130 Perspectives in Human Biology (prerequisite: BIO 129)
BIO 200 Evolutionary Biology
PGY 300 Human Physiology

Concentration Area Courses

SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY
Two of the following:
PSY 427 Adult Development and Aging (force by special arrangement)
SOC 304 Sociology of Aging
SSC 363 The Aging Process
SSC 407 Healthcare and the Elderly

Two of the following:
CEP 401 Introduction to Counseling
CEP 404 Introduction to the Rehabilitation of Substance Abuse and Addiction
CEP 410 Introduction to Grief and Loss
ECO 411 Health Economics
SOC 308 Sociology of the Life Course
SOC 313 Sociology of the Family
SOC 314 Sociology of Gender
SOC 322 Introduction to Medical Sociology
SSC 343 Violence and the Family
SSC 365 The Family Process
SSC 428 Legal Issues in Human Services

Practicum (a two-semester sequence; both courses are required):
SSC 496 Intership (first semester)
SSC 496 Internship (second semester)

EARLY CHILDHOOD
CDS 301 Language Development in Children (offered fall only)
CDS 302 Language Disorders in Children (offered spring only; prerequisite: CDS 301)
CEP 410 Introduction to Grief and Loss
HIS 465 Childhood Through the Ages
LAI 416/SSC 416 Early Childhood Education, Theory, and Practice
LAI 490 Seminar and Practicum in in Early Childhood Education, Theory, and Practice
LIN 355 Child Language Development
PSY 321 Psychology of Personality or PSY 322 Abnormal Psychology or PSY 336 Developmental Psychology
SOC 313 Sociology of the Family
SOC 314 Sociology of Gender
SOC 335 Sociology of Adolescence
SSC 305 Applied Child Development and Learning
SSC 320 Issues in Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities
SSC 343 Violence and the Family
SSC 365 The Family Process
SSC 420 Child Mental Health
SSC 496 Internship

COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH
One of the following:
PSY 323 Community Psychology
SSC 218 Issues in Mental Health (if not taken to meet requirement below)

Three of the following:
CEP 401 Introduction to Counseling
CEP 404 Introduction to the Rehabilitation of Substance Abuse and Addiction
CEP 410 Introduction to Grief and Loss
CEP 453 Introduction to Rehabilitation
NUR 217 Destructive and Constructive Behaviors: Addiction and Its Prevention
PSY 321 Psychology of Personality or PSY 322 Abnormal Psychology or PSY 331 Social Psychology
PSY 411 Self and Self-Esteem
SOC 314 Sociology of Gender
SOC 322 Introduction to Medical Sociology
SOC 335 Sociology of Adolescence
SSC 218 Issues in Mental Health (if not taken to meet requirement above)
SSC 320 Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities
SSC 343 Violence and the Family
SSC 407 Health-Care and the Elderly
SSC 420 Child Mental Health
SSC 428 Legal Issues in Human Services

Practicum (a two-semester sequence; both courses are required):
SSC 496 Internship (first semester)
SSC 496 Internship (second semester)

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - B.A./M.S.W.

Combined Health and Human Services/Social Work

Acceptance Criteria

TO UNDERGRADUATE PORTION OF DEGREE
Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Completion of prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better in each.

TO GRADUATE PORTION OF DEGREE
Minimum GPA of 3.0 overall.
Completed eleven of fifteen courses for undergraduate major (see below)
Completed all undergraduate general education requirements.
Completed 93 undergraduate credit hours.
Have significant employment, volunteer, or internship experience in a human service setting.

Advising Notes

Admission to the graduate portion of the degree is competitive. Meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee admission. Prerequisite courses listed immediately below are for admission to the undergraduate portion of the program only. Students need a human biology class for successful completion of the graduate program, so they are advised to take BIO 129 Human Biology to meet the biological sciences requirement.

Prerequisite Courses

PSY 101 Introductory Psychology
SSC 103 Introduction to Health and Human Services

Required Courses

One introductory course*
Two analytical skills courses (one statistics course and one methods course)*
One biological sciences course* (BIO 129 Perspectives in Human Biology is strongly recommended)
Three intermediate-level courses, one of which must be PHI 337 Social and Ethical Values in Medicine*
Two courses from the chosen concentration area

*See Social Sciences Interdisciplinary-BA/Concentration in Health and Human Services chart

Summary
Total required credit hours for the undergraduate portion (health and human services): 33-34

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Refer to the Graduate School's policies and procedures manual for requirements for masters degree candidates.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�PSY 101, SSC 103
Spring�One introductory course, one statistics course

SECOND YEAR
Fall�One biological sciences course, one methods course
Spring�Two intermediate courses**

THIRD YEAR
Fall�One intermediate course**, one concentration area course
Spring�One concentration area course
**PHI 337 Social and Ethical Values in Medicine is a required intermediate course.

In the fall semester of the third year, students should apply to the graduate portion of the degree program.


FOURTH-FIFTH YEARS
Please contact the School of Social Work for information on specific requirements.

Electives and Course Groupings

Concentration Area Courses

SOCIAL GERONTOLOGY
At least one of the following from Part A:
Part A
PSY 427, SOC 304, SSC 363, SSC 407
Part B
CEP 404, CEP 410, SOC 308, SOC 313, SOC 314, SOC 322, SSC 343, SSC 365, SSC 428

EARLY CHILDHOOD
CDS 301, CDS 302, CEP 410, HIS 465, LAI 416/SSC 416, LAI 490, LIN 355; PSY 321 or PSY 322 or PSY 336; SOC 313, SOC 314, SOC 335, SSC 305, SSC 320, SSC 343, SSC 365, SSC 420

COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH
CEP 404, CEP 410, CEP 453, NUR 217; PSY 321 or PSY 322 or PSY 331; PSY 411, SOC 314, SOC 322, SOC 335, SSC 218, SSC 320, SSC 343, SSC 407, SSC 420, SSC 428

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - B.A.

Concentration in International Studies

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Completion of prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better in each.
Students must successfully complete the first year of one of the languages listed below.

Advising Notes

The language requirement is an important component of the international studies concentration. Students must display proficiency in a language through the third year as taught at UB. A student�s choice of foreign language affects his choice of a regional focus area for his advanced courses in this major.

If a student has already mastered a foreign language before entering college, at the level equivalent to that attained by a student at UB completing the third year course, the Romance Languages department can certify this. In this case, the student must take three additional courses at the core or advanced level. See the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs advisor for international studies regarding these substitutions.

Substitutions of specific courses may be made with the approval of the Director of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs.

Prerequisite Courses

PSC 102 Introduction to International Politics
UGC 112 World Civilizations II
First year of language requirement

Required Courses

Remaining courses in language requirement
Two introductory courses
Three core courses
Four regional focus courses

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major (international studies): 33
(beyond completion of language requirement)

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�PSC 102
Spring�UGC 112

SECOND YEAR
Fall�Two introductory courses, first-semester language
Spring�Two core courses, second-semester language

THIRD YEAR
Fall�One regional focus course, one core course, third-semester language
Spring�One regional focus course, fourth-semester language

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�One regional focus course, fifth-semester language
Spring�One regional focus course, sixth-semester language

Electives and Course Groupings

Language Requirement

Chinese: First year--CHI 101-CHI 102 or CHI 104 or CHI 105 (summer only); second year--CHI 201-CHI 202; third year--CHI 301-CHI 302*
French: First year--FR 101-FR 102 or FR 104; second year--FR 151-FR 152; third year--FR 211-FR 212*
Italian: First year--ITA 101-ITA 102; second year--ITA 203 and ITA 206; third year--ITA 321-ITA 322*
Japanese: First year--JPN 101-JPN 102; second year--JPN 201-JPN 202; third year--JPN 301-JPN 302*
Korean: First year--KOR 101-KOR 102; second year--KOR 201-KOR 202; third year--KOR 301-KOR 302*
Polish: First year--POL 101-POL 102; second year--POL 203-POL 204; third year--POL 305-POL 306*
Russian: First year--RUS 101-RUS 102; second year--RUS 223-RUS 224; third year--RUS 301-RUS 302*
Spanish: First year--SPA 101-SPA 102 or SPA 104; second year--SPA 151-SPA 152 or SPA 171, SPA 172, SPA 241; third year--SPA 207-SPA 208*

*Students who wish to take other courses in place of the third-year courses listed here may do so with permission from the appropriate language directors in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.

Introductory Courses

ECO 181 Introduction to Macroeconomics
ECO 182 Introduction to Microeconomics
GEO 103 Geography of Economic Systems
PSC 103 Politics Abroad

Core Courses

Two of the following:
PSC 326 War and International Security
PSC 328 Economics and Foreign Policy
PSC 330 International Relations Problems
PSC 333 International Relations Theory
PSC 339 International Law
PSC 341 Political Change
PSC 373 International Futures
PSC 418 The International System
PSC 430 Human Rights

One of the following:
GEO 330 Dynamics of International Business
GEO 333 Bases of World Commerce
GEO 334 International Environments and Commercial Problems

Regional Focus

Four of the following courses from the regional focus appropriate for the foreign language the student has chosen.

MODERN EUROPE (A EUROPEAN LANGUAGE)
ECO 304 Socialist Economies (prerequisite: ECO 181; MTH 121-MTH 122 or MTH 141-MTH 142)
HIS 221 Eastern Europe 1880�1991
HIS 227 Twentieth-Century Europe and the World
HIS 315 German Culture and Society, 1789-1989
HIS 325 Twentieth-Century Britain, 1901�1974
HIS 332 Lenin, Stalin, and the Origins of Modern Russia
HIS 340 Germany�s Second Reich
HIS 377 Germany�s Third Reich I
HIS 378 Germany�s Third Reich II
HIS 423 Problems in Modern European History
HIS 475 The Great War and European Society
POL 324 Poland Today
POL 338 Poland in Central Europe
PSC 340 Politics in Western Europe
PSC 350 Politics of the U.S.S.R.

LATIN AMERICA (SPANISH)
APY 403 Comparing Cultures Worldwide
HIS 322 Latin America: Culture and History
HIS 414 Cuban Revolution
LLS 303 Mainland Puerto Rican Experience
LLS 308 Black Presence in Latin America
PHI 385 Latin American Thought
PSC 342 Politics of Developing Nations
PSC 372 Latin American Politics
PSC 379 Latino Politics
SPA 327 Spanish Culture and Civilization
SPA 328 Spanish American Culture and Civilization

ASIA (AN ASIAN LANGUAGE)
APY 265 Peoples of Southeast Asia
APY 362 People and Culture of Japan
APY 366 Peoples of Asia
HIS 289 Pearl Harbor: Japan Goes to War
HIS 367 Japan to 1600
HIS 368 Modern Japan Since 1600
HIS 375 U.S. and the Far East, 1898 to the Present
HIS 391 China and the World
HIS 401 U.S. Imperialism in Asia
HIS 485 Twentieth-Century China Politics
PSC 229 East Asian Political Economy
PSC 355 Asian Politics

AFRICA AND THE MIDDLE EAST (ARABIC, FRENCH, OR AN AFRICAN LANGUAGE)
AAS 280 Survey of African Studies
AAS 358 Africa Diaspora: Social and Cultural Evolution
APY 361 Anthropology of the Middle East
APY 403 Comparing Cultures Worldwide
HIS 213 Introduction to African History, 1800�Present
PSC 342 Politics of Developing Nations
PSC 370 African Politics
PSC 371 Middle Eastern Politics

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - B.A.

Concentration in Legal Studies

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Completion of prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better in each.

Prerequisite Courses

HIS 161 United States History I or HIS 162 United States History II
PSC 101 Introduction to American Politics

Required Courses

Two introductory courses
Two writing skills courses
One analytical skills course*
Seven advanced courses, one of which must be PSC 303 Constitutional Law
*This requirement should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major (legal studies): 42-43

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�HIS 161 or HIS 162; PSC 101
Spring�One introductory course

SECOND YEAR
Fall�One introductory course, one writing skills course
Spring�One writing skills course, one analytical skills course

THIRD YEAR
Fall�Two advanced courses**
Spring�Two advanced courses**

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�Two advanced courses**
Spring�One advanced course**
**PSC 303 Constitutional Law is a required advanced course.

Electives and Course Groupings

Introductory Courses

AAS 293 Race and the Law
APY 262 Anthropology and Justice
HIS 216 Crime and Punishment in America
JLS 130 American Jury Trial
JLS 131 Family and Law
JLS 201 Introduction to Law and Legal Process
MFC 332 Paralegal Principles and Procedures
PHI 239 Law and Morality
PHI 337 Social and Ethical Values in Medicine
PSC 215 Law and the Political Process (prerequisite for PSC 303; recommended)
PSC 225 Equality and Justice in the United States

Writing Skills Courses

Check with the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs each semester for any changes and substitutions made to this list:

ENG 205 Writing Prose: Fiction I
ENG 206 Writing Prose: Fiction II
ENG 221 World Literature I
ENG 222 World Literature II
ENG 231 Major British Writers I
ENG 232 Major British Writers II
ENG 241 American Writers I
ENG 242 American Writers II
ENG 251 Literary Types: Short Fiction
ENG 253 Literary Types: The Novel
ENG 254 Literary Types: Science Fiction
ENG 276 Literature and the Law
ENG 291 Legal and Literary Interpretation
ENG 319 Eighteenth-Century English Novel
ENG 325 Nineteenth-Century English Novel
ENG 332 Early American Literature
ENG 335 Nineteenth-Century American Novel
ENG 337 Modern American Literature
ENG 340 American Drama
ENG 342 Studies in American Literature
ENG 345 Studies in English and American Literature
ENG 350 Modern Poetry
ENG 353 European Fiction
ENG 359 The Bible as Literature
ENG 360 The Bible as Literature
ENG 367 Literature and Psychology
ENG 370 Multimedia Literature
ENG 383 Literature and Society
ENG 394 Journalism: Words and Pictures
ENG 397 Literary Journalism
ENG 398 Journalism
ENG 399 Journalism
ENG 439 Social Documentary
ENG 441 Contemporary Cinema
ENG 442 Contemporary Cinema
LAI 411/ULC 411 Teaching Writing by Tutoring
SSC 221 Writing in the Law

Analytical Skills Courses

CEP 207 Introduction to Statistics and Computing
PHI 115 Critical Thinking
PHI 215 Introduction to Deductive Logic
PSC 200 Empirical Political Science
PSC 408 Basic Statistics for Social Science
PSY 207 Psychological Statistics
PSY 250 Scientific Inquiry in Psychology
SOC 293 Social Research Methods
SOC 294 Basic Statistics for Social Sciences
SSC 213 Social Research Methods
SSC 225 Statistics for Social Sciences
STA 119 Statistical Methods

Advanced Courses

PSC 303 Constitutional Law** (required; prerequisite is PSC 215 or PSC 301)

Six of the following:
HIS 303 U.S. Constitution: Its Origins and Early Development
HIS 480 Topics in Early American Legal and Constitutional History
PHI 339 Philosophy of Law
PHI 340 Law and Responsibility
PSC 301 Cases in Civil Liberties (prerequisite: PSC 215)
PSC 302 Protecting Civil Liberties (prerequisite: PSC 215, PSC 301, or PSC 303)
PSC 304 Legislative Politics
PSC 305 Judicial Politics
PSC 308 Organizational Theory and Political Institutions
PSC 334 International Legal Problems
PSC 339 International Law
PSC 430 Human Rights
PSC 470 Legal Political Theory
SOC 307 Criminology
SOC 317 Criminal Justice Systems
SOC 319 Juvenile Justice
SOC 337 Sociology of Punishment
SOC 373 Sociology of Law
SOC 405 Sociology of Deviance
SSC 406 Law and the Environment
SSC 428 Legal Issues in Human Services
SSC 496 Internship (one semester only)
WS 305 Gender and the Custodial State
WS 353 Law Interprets Gender: The United States Experience

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - B.A.

Concentration in Urban and Public Policy Studies

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Completion of prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better in each.

Advising Notes

Students who plan to pursue graduate study in urban planning and design are advised to take the following courses: PD 120 Introduction to Urban Studies, PD 212 Urban and Environmental Planning, PD 301 Perspectives on Land Use and Development, PD 312 Design of Cities.

Prerequisite Courses

PSC 101 Introduction to American Politics
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Required Courses

Three introductory courses
Two analytical skills courses (one statistics course and one methods course)*
Two core courses*
Five advanced courses, including no more than three courses from any one department
*Students should complete the analytical skills requirement by the end of their sophomore year and the core course requirement by the end of their junior year.

Summary
Total required credit hours for the major (urban and public policy): 45-46

See Baccalaureate Degree Requirements for general education and remaining university requirements.

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Fall�PSC 101, SOC 101
Spring�One introductory course

SECOND YEAR
Fall�One introductory course, one analytical skills course (statistics)
Spring�One introductory course, one analytical skills course (methods)

THIRD YEAR
Fall�One core course, one advanced course
Spring�One core course, one advanced course

FOURTH YEAR
Fall�Two advanced courses
Spring�One advanced course

Electives and Course Groupings

Introductory Courses

ECO 181 Introduction to Macroeconomics
ECO 182 Introduction to Microeconomics
ECO 209 Introduction to Urban Economics
GEO 103 Geography of Economic Systems
PD 120 Introduction to Urban Studies
SOC 206 Social Problems

Analytical Skills

STATISTICS
CEP 207 Introduction to Statistics and Computing
PSY 207 Psychological Statistics
SOC 294 Basic Statistics for Social Sciences
SSC 225 Statistics for Social Sciences
STA 119 Statistical Methods

METHODS
PSY 250 Scientific Inquiry in Psychology
SOC 293 Social Research Methods
SSC 213 Social Research Methods

Core Courses

GEO 366 Urban Geography (if not taken to meet advanced requirement; prerequisite: GEO 103)
PD 212 Urban and Environmental Planning
PSC 310 Public Administration
PSC 312 Urban Politics
PSC 314 Public Policy Making
WS 414 Women and Public Policy

Advanced Courses

Note: Students may take no more than three courses from the same department.

APY 427 Comparative Urbanism
ECO 303 Economics of Poverty (prerequisite: ECO 181-ECO 182)
GEO 366 Urban Geography (if not taken to meet core requirement)
GEO 367 Urban Social Geography
GEO 418 Population Geography or SOC 329 Population Problems
GEO 419 Transportation (prerequisite: GEO 103)
PD 301 Perspectives on Land Use and Development
PD 312 Design of Cities
PSC 308 Organizational Theory in Political Institutions
PSC 315 American Political Economy
SOC 315 Sociology of City Life
SOC 321 Race and Ethnic Relations
SOC 328 Social Stratification
SOC 348 Urban Sociology
SOC 381 Social Movements
SSC 317 Environmental Politics
SSC 496 Community Internship Program
WS 353 Law Interprets Gender: The United States Experience

Social Sciences Interdisciplinary - Minor

Environmental Studies

Acceptance Criteria

Minimum GPA of 2.0 overall.
Acceptance to a major.
Completion of prerequisite course with a grade of C or better.

Advising Notes

Only one course applied to any other major or minor may be applied to meet the course requirements of this minor.

Prerequisite Courses

SSC 118 Introduction to Environmental Studies

Required Courses

One course from social science core
Two courses from natural sciences core
One course from each of the environmental tracks
One additional upper level course

Summary
Total required credit hours for the minor (environmental studies): 26

Electives and Course Groupings

SOCIAL SCIENCES CORE
APY 120 Environmental Anthropology
SSC 213 Social Research Methods
SSC 406 Law and the Environment

NATURAL SCIENCES CORE
BIO 200 Evolutionary Biology (offered fall only)
SSC 315 Field Ecology

ENVIRONMENTAL TRACKS
Environmental Policy
PD 301 Perspectives on Land Use and Development
SOC 446 Environmental Sociology
SSC 317 Environmental Politics
SSC 326 Great Lakes Ecology
SSC 360 Environmental Impact Statements
SSC 419 Wilderness
Environmental Resources
GEO 350 Landform Field and Lab Techniques
GEO 352 Introduction to Soils
GEO 356 Forest Ecology
GEO 435 Conservation Biogeography
GEO 445 Restoration Ecology
SSC 350 Water Quality
SSC 360 Environmental Impact Statements
SSC 385 Energy, Environment and Society
SSC 493 Ecology of Unique Environments
Environmental Education
ENG 211 Books of the Environment
SSC 238 Science, Religion and Nature
SSC 448 Animals, Zoos and Ecology
SSC 479 Environmental Education Practicum I (offered summer only)
SSC 480 Environmental Education Practicum II (offered summer only)
SSC 493 The Ecology of Unique Environments

ADDITIONAL UPPER LEVEL COURSE
SSC 496 Internship
Any additional course from an environmental track

Course Descriptions

ASI 100 University Honors Seminars

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Restricted to students in the University Honors Program; offered under specific titles that vary from semester to semester. Usually satisfies general education requirements, as well as honors requirements.

ASI 200 University Honors Seminar

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Restricted to students in the University Honors Program; offered under specific titles that vary from semester to semester. Usually satisfies general education requirements, as well as honors requirements.

ASI 300 University Honors Seminar

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Restricted to students in the University Honors Program; offered under specific titles that vary from semester to semester. Usually satisfies general education requirements, as well as honors requirements.

ASI 400 University Honors Seminar

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Restricted to students in the University Honors Program; offered under specific titles that vary from semester to semester. Usually satisfies general education requirements, as well as honors requirements.

ASI 401 Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Community-Linked Research

Credits:  4
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Provides research experience for undergraduates through participation in a large collaborative research project that has links to the community. A group of UB faculty and members of the community are involved in the research with the students.

SSC 100 Careers in Human Services

Credits:  1
Semester:
Prerequisites:  Permission of Instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Explores the range of professional and graduate school opportunities in human services and related fields.

SSC 103 Introduction to Health and Human Services

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Studies the health and human service system in the United States and locally, as it has been affected by history, changing values, and changes in the economic and political environment. Particularly emphasizes the gerontological, childhood, and community mental health service systems.

SSC 118 Introduction to Environmental Studies

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Involves an interdisciplinary approach to environmental issues. Explores ecological concepts, human environment, air and water pollution, pesticides, solid waste handling, mineral and energy resources, the nuclear fuel cycle, population and food resources, and environmental control.

SSC 209 Case Management

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An applied skills course for the delivery of human services. Considers the roles and functions of case management and various vulnerable client groups as target populations. Involves analyzing cases for client needs and comprehensive service planning. Practice competency, quality of care, and ethical standards are major concerns of the course. Small group activities and community-based interviews are important student learning experiences.

SSC 210 Skill Development in Human Service

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Involves a comprehensive orientation to career opportunities in human services. Introduces specific techniques and skills employed in human service careers.

SSC 213 Social Research Methods

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces procedures by which social scientists gather, analyze, and interpret information about the social world. Particularly emphasizes the use of campus-based resources for social service research.

SSC 218 Issues in Mental Health

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Identifies community mental health service components and explores trends and issues in the delivery of mental health services.

SSC 221 Writing in the Law

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Examines the legal writing process. Introduces students to the unique organization and structure of the law library, traditional as well as electronic. Requires group research and individual writing assignments.

SSC 225 Statistics for Social Sciences

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Provides a foundation in statistical techniques for interpreting quantitative social data, including binomial and normal distributions, the Chi-Square test, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis.

SSC 238 Science, Religion, and Nature

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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An environmental philosophy course that explores the impact of religion and science upon our perceptions of nature. Involves diverse studies in the areas of mythology, Eastern traditions, Western mysticism, Shamanism, the Gaia hypothesis, and environmental issues. Also includes a weekend workshop focused upon nature attunement, survival skills, and ecological studies.

SSC 305 Applied Child Development and Learning

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Integrates theory and current research with practical aspects of child rearing and family health. Explores developmental processes and behavior of young children as individuals and in group settings.

SSC 315 Field Ecology

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

A field-oriented course that explores the ecology of diverse ecosystems. Classes are conducted both on and off campus, and focus on interpretive experiences in the areas of botany, zoology, geology, herbology, ornithology, and general ecology.

SSC 317 Environmental Politics

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Focuses on the relationship between environmental problems and the political process. Explores definitions of an environmentally sustainable society. Then we attempt to answer the question of �how to get there from here.� This involves developing a theory of social change by examining a number of case studies. We study local environmental controversies from a political perspective through firsthand involvement or guest speakers. We also look at national environmental conflicts, such as the backlash against mainstream environmentalism created by the �Wise Use� movement and contemporary political forces championing property rights and states� rights.

SSC 320 Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

Explores causation, prevention, advocacy, housing, education, employment, and community services. Defines career opportunities in this area.

SSC 326 Great Lakes Ecology

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The Great Lakes hold nearly 20% of all the available fresh water on the planet. They provide drinking water, hydroelectricity, and both economic and recreational opportunities to millions who live around their shores. This class provides an understanding of the Great Lakes, from their formation to the important role they play in the political and ecological systems of North America. Focuses on historical and ecological aspects, as well as current political and policy issues surrounding the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence ecosystem. Students learn about the geology, biota, ecology, management, and social and political aspects of the Great Lakes, especially the lower lakes (Erie and Ontario). The course uses a multi-faceted ecosystem approach to diverse topics involved with understanding these complex ecological systems.

SSC 337 Social-Ethical Values in Medicine

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Applies ethical theories to analysis of important moral problems in health care and medicine. Same as PHI 337.

SSC 343 Violence and the Family

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Addresses issues in violence and violence prevention with sections on theoretical definitions and historical context. Topics include the social context of violent behavior in families, child abuse and neglect, abusive parenting, violence against women, abuse of the elderly, violence in communities of color, and the media�s influence on the development of antisocial behavior. Explores special problems of child protection services and the justice system�s approach toward domestic violence.

SSC 350 Water Quality

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  Chemistry or permission of instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Examines technical aspects of control of environmental wastes, ways in which wastes are generated, and their effects on the environment. Includes field trips to a local modern sewage treatment facility and a local environmental laboratory.

SSC 360 Environmental Impact Statements

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Examines the preparation of environmental impact statements (EIS) in response to federal and state requirements. Explores the mechanics of preparing and evaluating the EIS, as well as considering alternative courses of action.

SSC 363 The Aging Process

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Introduces the aging process. Explores physiological and clinical aspects.

SSC 365 The Family Process

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Considers the family: What is it? How does it work? How does it fail to work? Provides both United States and cross-cultural perspectives. Explores the theoretical foundation of family therapies.

SSC 385 Energy, Environment, and Society

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Focuses on the relationship between energy use and the associated impact on the environment and society. Explores our dependence upon traditional energy resources such as oil, coal, nuclear and natural gas as well as renewable energy resources such as geothermal, wind, solar, etc. Examines solutions to the difficult process of changing current energy consumption trends.

SSC 390 Human Services Administration

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Examines the practical aspects of managing a human services organization. Discusses the basic functions of management, including planning, budgeting, personnel, and organizational development. Presents these themes around such functions as team management, the consumer as customer, innovation, and creativity in attaining excellence.

SSC 391 Cognitive Science Colloquium

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Acquaints students with ongoing research in the range of disciplines affiliated with cognitive science. Primarily requires attendance at the weekly colloquium and symposium series of the Center for Cognitive Science. Requires students to read any literature that has been publicly preannounced to be relevant to the upcoming colloquium or symposium.

SSC 406 Law and the Environment

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Studies statutory and case law relating to pollution control, natural resources management, government regulation of land use, and the process and logic of decision making in governmental and legal institutions.

SSC 407 Health Care and the Elderly

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Provides students an opportunity to explore relevant issues in dealing with an elderly population in the health-care arena. Special focus on the frail elderly and aged with chronic medical conditions. Points of interest include incapacitaion, consents, confidentiality, ancillary and other services, rites of passage, the health-care team, managing the difficult patient, lethality assessments, family/professional relationships, health-care settings and intercultural communication.

SSC 419 Wilderness

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

Focuses on wilderness and biocentrism. Explores the idea of wilderness along three pathways. Part 1 deals with the history of biological wilderness and philosophical wilderness from Spinoza to Leopold to Snyder. Part 2 covers biological and other wilderness qualities. Part 3 examines the social movements related to wilderness and biocentrism. Also explores environmental ethics and morals. Investigates proposals for wilderness restoration, preservation, and expansion. A close examination of indigenous cultures� wilderness beliefs accompanies our study.

SSC 420 Child Mental Health

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

Examines the human service system as it affects the mental health needs of children; also addresses specific needs of special groups.

SSC 428 Legal Issues in Human Services

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Explores legal aspects of human services focusing on the constitutional right to privacy, the right to die, involuntary hospitalization and treatment of the mentally disabled, and entitlements. Covers family law, the rights of the elderly and the disabled, and laws concerned with special education.

SSC 431 Topics in Human Services

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Allows students to explore up-to-date information and current debates in their chosen field. Topic titles and offerings vary from semester to semester. Students should check with the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs to determine how the course may be used to fulfill major requirements.

SSC 432 Topics in Legal Studies

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Allows students to explore up-to-date information and current debates in their chosen field. Topic titles and offerings vary from semester to semester. Students should check with the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs to determine how the course may be used to fulfill major requirements.

SSC 433 Topics in Environmental Studies

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Allows students to explore up-to-date information and current debates in their chosen field. Topic titles and offerings vary from semester to semester. Students should check with the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs to determine how the course may be used to fulfill major requirements.

SSC 434 Topics in Urban and Public Policy

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

View Schedule

The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Allows students to explore up-to-date information and current debates in their chosen field. Topic titles and offerings vary from semester to semester. Students should check with the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs to determine how the course may be used to fulfill major requirements.

SSC 448 Animals, Zoos, and Ecology

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

View Schedule

Held at the Buffalo Zoo.

Introduces the study of animal behavior. Explores natural behaviors and the factors affecting those behaviors by covering such topics as the evolution of behavior, the nervous and endocrine systems, biological rhythms, social systems, reproductive behavior, and more. Course participants examine and understand animal behavior through lectures, readings, short projects, and direct observation of the animal populations on zoo grounds.

SSC 479 Environmental Education Practicum I

Credits:  3
Semester: Su
Prerequisites:  SSC 315
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

View Schedule

A one-week field-based course involving a teacher training program in the areas of field ecology, environmental analysis, and conservation biology. Students participate in both lecture and laboratory experiences designed to train them as field ecologists as well as environmental educators. Conducted in residence at the Woodlands Environmental Education Center.

SSC 480 Environmental Education Practicum II

Credits:  3
Semester: Su
Prerequisites:  SSC 479
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

View Schedule

A two-week experience in which students serve as environmental educators in a Summer Ecology Camp for elementary/middle school students. Practicum students develop lesson plans, implement programs, and conduct research utilizing the training and skills they gained in SSC 479. Conducted in residence at the Woodlands Environmental Education Center.

SSC 493 Ecology of Unique Environments

Credits:  3
Semester: Sp
Prerequisites:  SSC 315
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LAB

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Involves a week-long field ecology intensive at unique and threatened environments throughout the United States. Participants attend a wide variety of interpretive programs regarding the history, ecology, and politics of these environments. The IDP office announces potential expeditions for January and/or July/August.

SSC 496 Internship

Credits:  1
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  Permission of Instructor
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Community internship, health and human services internship, or environmental studies internship. See the appropriate SSC advisor for details.

SSC 499 Independent Study

Credits:  1 - 4
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  TUT

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The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

Various instructors offer independent study. Check with the Office of Interdisciplinary Degree Programs each semester.

Updated: Oct 2, 2006 12:20:58 PM