Education Minor*

Graduate School of Education

375 Baldy Hall
North Campus
Buffalo, NY 14260

Phone: 716.645.2461
Fax: 716.645.3631
Web: www.gse.buffalo.edu/programs/tei/index.asp

Julius Gregg Adams
Associate Dean for Teacher Education

David Cantaffa
Associate Director

Judi Roberson
Coordinator of Field Experiences

Retta Maclin
Advisor

About the Program

* A nondegree certification program only

**Because New York State education requirements may change, program requirements may be altered according to state specifications. Therefore, students should check with the Teacher Education Institute for explanation of program and certification requirements.

The Graduate School of Education (GSE) is committed to providing teacher education at the post-baccalaureate level. The Teacher Education Institute (TEI) is the branch of GSE responsible for the field experiences and student teaching required for New York State initial certification in early childhood, childhood, middle childhood and adolescence education. Beyond providing professional knowledge and instructional strategies essential to teaching, TEI collaborates with local school districts and teachers to prepare preservice teachers to be problem solvers and critical thinkers who strive to self-reflect and improve their teaching. The teacher education program seeks to prepare teachers who can work effectively with students with a wide variety of abilities and needs, and students from various cultures.

Degree Options

The Teacher Education Institute does not offer a program leading to an undergraduate degree; however, it does offer undergraduate students a minor in education that introduces them to the profession of education and provides them an opportunity to explore education as a career. It also allows them a head start on the coursework leading to initial teacher certification through the University at Buffalo�s graduate school program, but this minor cannot in itself lead directly to teacher certification.

Although intended for those who will pursue certification in Adolescence education (Grades 7-12), the minor can be adapted for those interested in Early Childhood Education (birth to Grade 2) and/or Childhood Education (Grades 1-6).

At the graduate level, TEI offers Certificates of Advanced Study in Initial Certification for Adolescence Education (Grades 7-12) in the following areas: English, Languages Other Than English (French, German, Italian, Latin, and Spanish), Mathematics, Music, Science (Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physics), and Social Studies.

In addition, many other graduate programs in education are offered by the Graduate School of Education.

Acceptance Information

Registration in the teacher education minor is open to students who formally apply to the minor and who receive confirmation of acceptance prior to registration. Applications to the minor must be filed with the Teacher Education Institute (TEI) office in 375 Baldy Hall. Applications must include UB DARS report and/or official transcripts from all institutions attended other than UB. Students must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 for admission.

Career Opportunities/Further Study

Students who have completed 75 undergraduate credits in an approved major with a minimum GPA of 3.0 can apply on-line to an initial certification (i.e., advanced certificate without an Ed.M. degree) or initial/professional certification program (with Ed.M. degree) for provisional admission pending completion of their undergraduate degree. Students who have been provisionally admitted and who have completed 90 undergraduate credits may take two graduate-level education courses (upon advisement) and include them in their graduate program in education.

Education - Minor

Acceptance Criteria

For Undergraduate Minor in Education

Minimum GPA of 2.5.

Advising Notes

The first course (LAI 350) in the minor is an introductory course that is not part of the required coursework for certification. It does, however, have a field experience component, and early field experiences are required in the latest NYS Education Department regulations.

The next two courses, CEP 400 and ELP 405, can be used to meet requirements for initial certification as an Adolescence teacher. The final three courses in the minor are electives, which may also meet teacher certification course requirements (depending upon which graduate program the student eventually pursues).

Students who take CEP 400, ELP 405, and LAI 414, and complete them successfully, and who later pursue a UB program leading to initial teacher certification at the Adolescence level may include these courses in their coursework toward initial certification (but not the master�s degree). This allows students to have a 9-credit head start toward their initial certification.

For Application to Graduate Teacher Certification Programs

Admission to all graduate initial and initial/professional teacher certification programs requires applicants to complete a baccalaureate degree with a minimum 30 credit hour major appropriate to the certification area. Additionally, admission to all graduate initial and initial/professional teacher certification programs requires applicants to complete a general education core in liberal arts and sciences, to include a 2nd semester college course in a language other than English and six credits in a lab-based science (biology, chemistry, earth science, or physics).

Note: Philosophy, psychology, and sociology may be used to fulfill the social science requirements for the general education core in liberal arts and sciences, but are not acceptable as majors for admission to teacher certification programs at the University at Buffalo, except as stated for those interested in pursuing social studies teaching in grades 7-12.

For Application to Graduate Adolescence Programs

For students interested in pursuing teacher certification through our graduate adolescence initial or initial/professional teacher certification program, the following information regarding undergraduate degree and distribution requirements will be of assistance in planning undergraduate coursework.

English
A baccalaureate degree in English, which includes at least 30 hours of coursework in English.

Languages Other Than English
A baccalaureate degree in an approved foreign language, which includes at least 30 hours of coursework in the foreign language.

Mathematics
A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, which includes at least 30 hours of coursework in mathematics.

The following mathematics distribution must also be met:
2 courses in linear and/or abstract algebra
2 courses in calculus
1 course in geometry

Music
A Bachelor�s degree in Music Performance is required.

In addition, the following academic distribution is required.

Academics/Performance:
4 courses in music theory
2 courses in music history
2 courses in conducting
4 courses in a primary instrument (including voice)
Semester and year of public recital
Keyboard Proficiency Exam
Secondary Instrument Proficiency: Woodwinds, brasses, percussion, or strings

Social Studies
A baccalaureate degree in history or one of the social sciences (anthropology, sociology, geography, economics, or political science), which includes at least 21 credits in history or geography and one economics and one political science course.

In addition, the following history/civilization distribution is required.

6 credits in U.S. history
6 credits in U.S. civilization
6 credits in Western civilization
12 credits in world civilization

Also, the following social sciences distribution is required--two courses in each of three social sciences.

Political science
Geography
Economics
Sociology
Anthropology
Psychology or philosophy

(There may be up to 12 credits overlapping between the above distribution groupings)

Note: Philosophy and psychology may be used to fulfill the social science distribution requirements, but are not acceptable as majors leading to social studies certification.

Science
A baccalaureate degree with at least 30 hours of coursework in your intended certificate area (biology, chemistry, Earth science, or physics).

In addition, the following academic distribution is required for every science specialty certificate.

3 credits in biology
3 credits in chemistry
3 credits in Earth science
3 credits in physics

For Application to Graduate Early Childhood and Childhood Programs

For students interested in pursuing teacher certification through our graduate early childhood and/or childhood initial/professional teacher certification program, the following information regarding undergraduate degree requirements will be of assistance in planning undergraduate coursework.

University at Buffalo�s Approved Undergraduate Majors for Teacher Certification

Anthropology
Art
Art History
Biochemistry
Biological Sciences
Chemistry
Classics
Dance
Economics
English
French
Geography
Geological Sciences
German
History
Italian
Linguistics (English to Speakers of Other Languages only)
Mathematics
Music
Physics
Political Science
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary (Health and Human Services: Early Childhood concentration only)
Spanish
Theatre

Required Courses

LAI 350 Introduction to Education
CEP 400 Educational Psychology
ELP 405 Sociology of Education
Three elective courses

Summary
Total required credit hours for the minor...19

Recommended Sequence of Program Requirements

FIRST YEAR
Spring�LAI 350

SECOND YEAR
Fall�CEP 400, ELP 405
Spring�LAI 414 or elective from the list below

THIRD YEAR
Fall�Two electives from the list below

Electives and Course Groupings

CEP 401 Introduction to Counseling
CEP 404 Introduction to the Rehabilitation of Substance Abuse & Addiction
CEP 453 Introduction to Rehabilitation
LAI 205 Introduction to Child Development and Learning
LAI 414 Language, Cognition, and Writing
LAI 416 Early Childhood Education Theory and Practice
LAI 474 Teaching the Exceptional Learner
LAI 490 Seminar and Practicum in Early Childhood

Course Descriptions

CEP 400 Educational Psychology

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp Su
Prerequisites:  LAI 350 (if using for education minor)
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC/REC

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Covers psychological principles and research relevant to educational practice, human growth and development, the learning process, educational measurement, individual differences, and mental health in the schools.

CEP 401 Introduction to Counseling

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp Su
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Provides an overview of the counseling professions. Covers history and origins, theoretical approaches to counseling and psychotherapy, techniques, group counseling, marriage and family counseling, grief counseling, and vocational counseling.

CEP 404 Introduction to the Rehabilitation of Substance Abuse and Addiction

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Introduces the field of rehabilitation counseling and its application to substance abuse and addiction. Examines the social, psychological, and biological bases of addiction; assessment, diagnosis, and treatment issues; and understanding of the functional limitations of substance addiction, especially as they relate to work and independent living.

CEP 453 Introduction to Rehabilitation

Credits:  3
Semester: F
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Explores basic history, concepts, and practices in the rehabilitation of persons with physical, mental, or emotional disabilities. Emphasizes modern vocational rehabilitation, and considers rehabilitation careers.

ELP 405 Sociology of Education

Credits:  3
Semester: F Sp
Prerequisites:  LAI 350
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Students examine and clarify a number of the important concepts and principles in terms of which core educational issues can be understood; e.g., intelligence and rationality, perception and bias, authority, and socialization. Students also explore common assumptions about knowledge, values, and human nature that underlie educational theories and practices. In addition, students examine the influence of diverse cultural perspectives, personal beliefs, and values on several essential aspects of teaching; e.g., an appreciation of distinctive learning styles, and the hidden curriculum.

LAI 205 Introduction to Child Development and Learning

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Examines developmental milestones, needs, and characteristics of children from infancy through the early school years; including child-care play, personality, learning activities, and family relationships. Also discusses controversial areas of child rearing, and current trends.

LAI 350 Introduction to Education

Credits:  4
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None

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Intended for students contemplating a career in education. Provides information and a forum for discussion of American education. Among the topics covered are a brief history of American education, the learning environment, teachers, diverse learners (ethnically, economically, and of differing abilities), classroom management, and issues facing all schools. In addition, students become generally familiar with the New York State Learning Standards. A group school visit is also a course component as are 20 supervised classroom contact hours.

LAI 414 Language, Cognition, and Writing

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  CEP 400, LAI 350
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Begins with an overview of theory and research in cognitive strategies and sociocognitive views of reading, writing, speaking and listening processes. The course then describes an approach to the teaching of reading and writing called strategic literacy instruction. The focus throughout is on discovering ways to help struggling readers and writers:students usually referred to as "low performing","general", or "developmental;" students perceived as learning-disabled, resistant, at-risk, or lower-track;students in special education classes or in classes where special students are mainstreamed;or kids who are simply unmotivated. Evaluation includes a midterm report anda final project concerned with designing stategy-based literacy instruction.

LAI 416 Early Childhood Educational Theory and Practice

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  LEC

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Undergraduate students explore their role as reflective teachers. Examines curriculum based on early childhood theories. Teaches methods of designing appropriate EC environments, and examines the teacher�s role in documenting children�s learning. Guides students toward active membership and involvement in professional organizations.

LAI 474 Teaching the Exceptional Learner

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Aids in understanding diversity by preparing teachers to offer direct and indirect services to students within the full range of disabilities and special health-care needs in inclusive environments. Students are provided with techniques designed to enhance academic performance, classroom behavior, and social acceptance for students with disabilities and special needs. Students learn skills enabling them to (1) differentiate and individualize instruction for students with disabilities and special needs, (2) become familiar with instructional and assistive technologies, (3) implement multiple research-validated instructional strategies, (4) formally and informally assess learning of diverse students, (5) manage classroom behavior of students with disabilities and special needs, and (6) collaborate with others and resolve conflicts to educate students with disabilities and special needs.

LAI 490 Seminar and Practicum in Early Childhood Programs

Credits:  3
Semester:
Prerequisites:  None
Corequisites:  None
Type:  SEM

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Actively involves students, one morning or afternoon per week, in a preschool classroom experience at the Early Childhood Research Center. Offers students guided learning experience as teachers in a NAEYC accredited preschool multicultural setting. The weekly one-hour seminar provides the support needed by teachers in understanding and applying a constructive play curriculum, which fosters children�s social, emotional, physical and cognitive development. Child observation and naturalistic assessment are major course components.

 

Updated: Apr 12, 2006 11:04:07 AM