History : Courses

HIS 102 Survey of Greek History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
An introduction to the history of ancient Greece from Mycenaean Period to Alexander the Great, with emphasis on social organization, political and judicial institutions, religious organizations, and civic identity. Readings will include selections from the Greek historians, (Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, and Plutarch), Greek drama, the Greek orators, and philosophers, and inscriptions recording decrees, laws and treaties. Major archeological evidence will be presented and students will write 2 exams (midterm and final) and one short paper.EAR

HIS 113 Myth & Religion in the Ancient World

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
An investigation of the mythic and religious traditions of the ancient Greeks and Romans. The Greco-Roman traditions are examined in comparison with those of other ancient Indo-European peoples, especially the Hittites, Indians, Persians, Celts and Vikings. Cross-listed with CL 113 & RSP 113. EAR

HIS 151 Western Civilization I

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LR
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Western civilization from its beginnings to 1715.EAR

HIS 152 Western Civilization II

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LR
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Western civilization from 1715 through the twentieth century.MOD

HIS 161 United States History I

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LR
Grading: Graded (A-F)
U.S. history from Native American settlement to the end of the Civil War.USH

HIS 162 United States History II

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LR
Grading: Graded (A-F)
U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present.USH

HIS 181 Asian Civilization 1

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
AAL

HIS 182 Asian Civilization II

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction to major themes and events in the histories of China and Japan, the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia in modern times. Considers the impacts of colonialism and imperialism, the emergence of nationalist and revolutionary movements, decolonization and the Cold War. Our goal is to understand the historical forces and transformations shaping contemporary Asia, the common experiences that different areas of Asia have shared in the modern era, and what distinguishes the histories of particular Asian nations within a comparative perspective.AAL

HIS 200 Movies and Modern American Society

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Movies are a window into the era in which they were made. We examine the political and social context out of which some American film classics emerged. We consider a variety of major movies, ranging from "The Grapes of Wrath," "Casablanca," "Dr. Strangelove," and "M.A.S.H.," to more recent hits like "Star Wars," and "Platoon."USH

HIS 201 Israel & the Ancient Near East

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
People of the Bible; the environment in which they lived; what they absorbed and rejected from Mesopotamia, Syria, Anatolia, Iran, Egypt. Cross-listed with JDS 201 & RPS 201.AAL

HIS 202 Roman Civilization

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course poses the following questions: Who were the Romans? Who did the Romans think they were? What is the Roman cultural achievement? Our investigation will range from Rome's mythical beginnings to the time of the emperors, and consider the full spectrum of Rome's cultural expression. We will consider not only the lofty plane of literature, painting, sculpture and architecture, but also the mundane details of everyday life in the Roman world. We will encounter a range of Roman characters, from a mad emperor singing while his city burned, to a tricky slave cheating his master on the comic state, to gladiators fighting and dying in the arena for people's pleasure. The roles played by marginal figures (women, slaves, and foreigners) will be emphasized. Cross-listed with CL 223.EAR

HIS 203 Greek Civilization

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Elements of Greek civilization analyzed from synchronistic and developmental views to produce a coherent image of that culture as a living and expanding entity. Cross-listed with CL 222.EAR

HIS 205 Ancient Near East & Egypt

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This is a topical survey of the contribution of ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian cultures to Western History and thought, from the 'invention' of writing to the fall of the Assyrian Empire. After a discussion of the origins of what civilization is in the context of the urbanization of Egypt and Mesopotamia, we will then continue on to study the nature of kingship, religion (including church vs. State issues, approaches to divinity), trade and economy, and the development and pursuit of empire. There is a short, summarizing textbook and collateral readings of original documents in translation. Several videos and access to WEB-based tools will be made available for the course. Assignments include a mid-term, final, and a short paper on an approved topic.EAR

HIS 206 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Topics vary by semester.EAR

HIS 208 U S in the World

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
USH

HIS 209 The American Civil War

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduction in to the causes of the American Civil War, its impact on the American nation, and its continued significance for American politics and society. Topics covered include: the role of slavery in antebellum politics and the crisis of the 1850s, army life, the changing nature of warfare and introduction of "total war" tactics, changes in gender relations and women's political activism, Abraham Lincoln and his assassination, slave emancipation, Reconstruction, and the memorialization of the war from the nineteenth century to the present day. We will read a variety of primary and secondary source documents, as well as literary treatments of the period and films, in order to obtain a fuller cultural understanding of this pivotal moment in American history.USH

HIS 210 Women of the Ancient World

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course will introduce the student to the life of women in the ancient Greek and Roman world. The role of women will be investigated through primary sources - written, archaeological, and visual. By analyzing this evidence we will also study the legal, economic, religious, and social status of women in the ancient world. In addition, the students will be exposed to the ancient and modern scholarship concerning attitudes towards women. Cross-listed with CL 210.EAR

HIS 213 African History 1800-Now

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The second of two introductory surveys of African history offered by the Department of History. In this course, we focus on African history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The course covers the increasing encroachment on African by European colonialism and the historical responses of Africans to colonial rule. Among the larger themes that the course will focus on are the responses of African societies to the ending of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Islamic reform and activism in the nineteenth century, colonial political economies, religious change, labor mobilization and migration, urbanization, African political mobilization, and anti-colonial nationalism. The course will also consider some of the historical outcomes in post-colonial Africa.AAL

HIS 215 Death in America

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course examines death in America from before Columbus until today. Through lectures, movies, music, slides, and the World Wide Web, we will investigate how people have thought about death throughout American history. Because people have always been fascinated with death, they left behind numerous sources that allow us access to their innermost thoughts: diaries, letters, gravestones, songs and artwork. We will examine these sources to learn how attitudes towards death and dying have changed over the last several centuries. Topics include Indian burial practices, Puritan death, the problem of infant morality, the meaning of death in the Civil War, capital punishment today, and physician-assisted suicide.USH

HIS 216 Crime and Punishment in America

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
In colonial America, practicing witchcraft was against the law. Beating your wife was not. Convicted wrongdoers faced hanging, flogging, even branding - but not prison. There has always been crime and punishment in America, but just what counts as crime, which crimes are committed, which are especially dreaded, how criminals are prosecuted, who they are and what kinds of penalties they face has changed from century to century.

HIS 228 Colonialism

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The decolonization of the postwar period, often a violent process, defined colonialism primarily in political and economic terms. Recently, the analysis has shifted to understanding empire as a cultural phenomenon-to understanding it, that is, as a system of thought that enabled the political and economic view of colonialism. Recent analysis also stresses that colonialism had cultural repercussions both for the colonial authorities and for the colonized. This course applies these insights as it explores three phases of European imperialism. We begin by looking at the Spanish empire in the New World and at the expansion of trade and the gradual accumulation of outposts in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The emphasis then shifts to the study of nineteenth-century colonialism. The first example will be India: how the British came to control and administer this part of the world. Then, we shall examine the transfer of this model of colonial administration to Africa in the late nineteenth-century, examining, at that point, French, German, as well as British versions of empire.MOD

HIS 229 Medieval Judaism

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
An in depth study of critical topics in Jewish history and culture from the Arab conquest of the Middle East and North Africa until the French Revolution. Topics discussed will be: Medieval Biblical Exegesis, the Koran, the Golden Age in Spain, Crusades, the Inquisitions, Mysticism, Messianism, Pietism, the Ghetto, Scholasticism, Secularism and the French Revolution. Cross-listed with RSP 229, JDS 229 EAR

HIS 231 Israel & Emerg of Judaism

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
EAR

HIS 232 Crisis in Jewish History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Six issues in Jewish history and their impact on the development of Judaism and on the Jewish community; analysis of the resilience and adaptability of a people under stress. Cross-listed with JDS 102. MOD

HIS 233 His, Geo, & Arch of Israel

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
EAR

HIS 237 History of Israel & Zionism

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
A survey of the Origins of the State of Israel to the present day. The development of the Zionist Idea and its implementations. Israel and its historic purpose as a center of religious and political hope. Primarily social and political history.AAL

HIS 248 War in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Warfare has been a constant feature of societies and civilizations. It both destabilizes and stabilizes the order of things. All the dualities of human nature are intimately bound up with and played out in warfare. However we feel about them, wars past and present, perhaps more than any other single factor, have shaped the world we live in. This course is designed to provide a historically anchored survey of warfare in the ancient Mediterranean civilizations, particularly those of Greece and Rome.

HIS 249 Social History of Sport and Recreation

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The main aim of the course is to develop an understanding of the history of sport and recreation, not as isolated activities but in their social contexts; i.e., as they are influenced by, and themselves influence, other aspects of society, including the social, political and economic aspects of culture. Topics which will be explored include, but are not limited to, examinations of: the role of sport in relation to the growth of industrialization and nationalism in the nineteenth century; the role of race, gender, class, and sexuality as determining factors in the evolution of national sporting traditions, the connections between the international aspects of sport and Western dominance in the global marketplace, and finally, the relationship between sport and notions of civilization, masculinity, and femininity. The predominant focus will be on examples drawn from the Anglophone world of the United States, United Kingdom and the former British Empire.MOD

HIS 255 Nationalism and Democracy

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
What was the "long nineteenth century" in Europe, and why should we study it today? This course traces the radical transformation of Europe from a traditional agrarian society with vast poor and illiterate regions in 1789 to the industrialized continent that plunged the world into war in 1914.MOD

HIS 275 Vietnam & the Vietnam War

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
AAL

HIS 280 Survey of African Studies

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
AAL

HIS 295 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Content varies by semester.USH

HIS 299 The Holocaust and History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
How did the Holocaust happen? What groups were swept up in its path? How have victims, perpetrators, and bystanders written and re-written the accounts of what happened? And how do we remember this today? This course places the Holocaust in the broad context of European history. We examine cultural, political, and social developments during this period by reading first-hand accounts, novels, and some classic texts such as Art Spiegelman's Maus, Victor Klemperer's I Will Bear Witness, and Ian Kershaw's The Hitler Myth. We will also view selected films, among them Triumph of the Will and Shoah.MOD

HIS 300 The Age of Exploration

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Bridges the Atlantic by examining European exploration and the founding of European colonies in North and South America, 1400-1800.

HIS 301 History of Roman Empire

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Surveys the span of Roman history from the formation of the imperial system of government, the Principate, in 27 BCE under Octavian (aka Augustus, the August One), to the death of Constantine in 337 CE. We will explore several aspects of the Roman world - political, familial, cultural, social, economic, artistic, architectural, military, etcetcetc - and we will draw on the writings of the Romans themselves and modern scholars, as well as on archaeological sources. Some attention will be given as well to subsequent 'afterlives' of the Roman Empire, from Byzantium to Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.MOD

HIS 302 Latin American Colonial History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
A survey of the conquest and colonization of Latin America from Pre-Columbian civilizations through independence in the early nineteenth century, this course focuses on the creation of new societies in the Americas, shaped by the interaction of Europeans, Indians, and Africans. We will concentrate on the three great poles of colonial development in the New World-central Mexico, highland Peru, and coastal Brazil but our inquiry will also include the Caribbean and other regions. Emphasis is on social and cultural history, including such topics as popular religion, native labor systems, slavery and the slave trade, race relations, marriage and the family, and the challenges of daily life.AAL

HIS 303 U.S. Constitution: Its Origins and Early Development

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Themes include: (1) the creation of the United States Constitution, emphasizing the transplantation and transformation of English institutions in the period before 1787 and on the immediate ideological, social, and economic background of the Constitution during the years 1776-1787; (2) the adoption of the Bill of Rights, including the creation of a national judiciary system, the setting of early precedents, and the meaning of Freedom of the press in the years immediately following the Constitution's adoption. We also confront the relationship of the Constitution to the development of political parties and how these parties in turn effected the operation of the Constitution. 3) The impact of John Marshall and the Supreme Court, including the major issues confronting the Court: judicial review, federal-state relations and the development of a legal framework for the growth of a national economy as well as the modifications in these areas imposed by the Taney Court. 4) Slavery, primarily the problem of slavery as a constitutional question and the relationship of this issue to the coming of the Civil War.USH

HIS 304 Art & Revolutionary Politics in Latin America

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course examines the history of political change in 20th century Latin America through the prism of art and aesthetics. We focus on three central areas - Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua - where revolutionary political change has gone hand in hand with aesthetic and artistic production. Our goal is to study the political history of these places, but to do so in a way that incorporates a range of materials and documents that are often left out of traditional political histories - namely visual culture and visual sources including but not limited to film, photography, theater, political muralism, poster art, performance art, and graffiti.AAL

HIS 305 Modern Spain, Italy, and Portugal

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examination of the dynamics of nationalism, imperialism, revolutionary ideology, and three variants of right-wing dictatorship in Southwestern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries.MOD

HIS 306 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 307 History of Paris

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The objectives of the course are to provide students with insights both into European urbanization and the specific development and cultural importance of Paris. The course covers four different time periods: the Middle Ages, the eighteenth century, the second half of the nineteenth century (from Haussmanization during the Second Empire to the 1889 World's Fair and the Eiffel Tower), ending with the post-WWI influx of Americans, known as The Lost Generation. The main text for the course will be Colin Jones' History of Paris. Students are encouraged to write a research paper on an American in Paris from a list of important visitors.MOD

HIS 308 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.AAL

HIS 312 The United States in the Age of Jackson, 1815-1837

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The course details developments in America between 1815 and 1837. Stress will be placed on political, economic, and social developments. The major problems emphasized are: the results of the War of 1812, the development of the West, the impact of the transportation revolution, the origins of the Jacksonian movement, Jacksonian democracy, social reform, and the development of slavery as a political issue.USH

HIS 313 20th Century Europe

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course is designed to present a survey of major political, cultural, and social developments in Europe during the 20th century. In the first half of the semester, the course examines the concept of "modernity" and the rise of mass society. We look at the causes and the experience of the two world wars in Europe, analyze the rise of totalitarian ideologies and dictatorial states, and include the Holocaust. In the second half of the semester, we deal with the division of the European continent under the conditions of the Cold War, and examine the new cultural and intellectual dynamics within European society after 1960. Finally, this course will address the collapse of the Cold War order and the birth of new nation-states in Europe around 1990. Visual materials play a prominent role throughout the semester.

HIS 315 German Culture and Society, 1789-1989

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
German history from Bismarck to the unified Germany of today.

HIS 316 Early Modern Europe

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course serves as an introduction to European history from approximately 1400-1789, using several key themes. Many dramatic transformations-religious, political, economic, social, intellectual-played a role creating the modern world. This course examines transformations central to the development of the modern and encourages seeing the familiar elements brought about by these changes. This class also strives to show the complexity of this period, including the instability and uncertainty of the changes. Many things about the Early Modern are unfamiliar to us, and in many ways it is an alien culture. Early Modern Europe has a dual nature, and the readings of this course should be a tug-of-war between the familiar and odd; it should be recognizable and strangely distant at the same time. Ultimately, this course proposes that the birth of the modern world, as we know it, was not the only path, and the Early modern period offered many possibilities.

HIS 317 History of Early Modern Britain

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
England, under the ruling Tudor family, underwent significant political, social, economic, and religious and cultural change. We will read recent scholarly works on England between 1485 and 1603 and analyze key primary sources drawn from the period, including parochial and state records, literature, art, and music. Themes will be drawn from among the following: the monarchy and changes in the state, religion and the Reformation, social change, gender and the family, and early empire and exploration.

HIS 318 History of Ireland

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course is an introduction to the history and historiography of Ireland from the seventeenth century to the present, with an emphasis on Ireland's social, cultural and political history from the Cromwellian invasion to the Good Friday Peace accords. While the past is important to most modern cultures, it is particularly central to modern Irish society. The past (or various interpretations of the past) is so often used as ammunition in the on-going battle over the relationship between the Republic of Ireland, Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The goal of the class will be to untangle the intertwined threads of history, legend, propaganda, and folklore which comprise the Irish vision of the past. Topics covered include: the 1798 United Irishmen's Rebellion, the creation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Catholic Emancipation, the Great Famine/An Gorta Mor, the Gaelic Renaissance, the Home Rule movement, the Troubles, the Irish Diaspora, and the roles of the religion, sport, music, drama and literature in the creation of the Irish nation.

HIS 319 World Between the Wars

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This is an advanced level undergraduate survey of World history between World War I and World War II. Students will be introduced to interwar history as the great period of crisis in contemporary history. This concept will be considered from diverse perspectives, including the changing dynamics of international relations, rapid social and cultural transformations, and the radical new politics ushered in by World War I and its aftermath. The course will focus on the major conflicts of the period, particularly those resulting from World War I and leading to World War II. Considerable attention will be given to the formation of the Soviet Union; the formation of the modern Middle East; the revolutionary civil wars in Spain, China, and elsewhere; the crisis of liberal democracies; and the rise of an age of dictatorship across much of the globe.

HIS 320 British History, 1668-1848

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The structure of aristocratic society and the impact of industrialization upon that society.

HIS 321 Victorian History, 1832-1901

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
In 1851, when the Great Exhibition opened in the new Crystal Palace in London, Britain's position as the pre-eminent great power in the world seemed unrivaled. The Crystal Palace was a massive glass structure that covered almost nineteen acres of ground and showcased some of the most spectacular examples of British ingenuity produced by a century of industrial growth in canals, railways, and factories. HIS 321 will look at both the self-congratulatory and hopeful world of Great Britain and the British empire during the reign of Queen Victoria as well the underside of that world that included new depths of Dickensian poverty, famine in Ireland and the grisly East End of Jack the Ripper. We will explore a range of themes, including: urbanization, class tensions, industrial change, imperialism, gender, socialism, rural nostalgia. In particular, the class will chart the rise of industrial wealth, the problems of urbanization, the expansion of the British empire, and the development of an interventionist state.

HIS 322 Latin America: Culture and History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The leaders of the newly independent Latin American nations faced a multitude of problems. Geography, culture, economics, and political rivalries doomed most Latin nations to chaos and economic underdevelopment. The first part of this class will focus on the colonial legacy and nineteenth century frustration. The class will examine two unique attempts to grapple with those problems in Haiti and Paraguay. The next two sections will cover failed attempts at reform in Chile, Argentina, and Uruguay and then study equally futile revolutions in Mexico, Cuba, Bolivia, and Nicaragua. The fourth section of the course will focus on current problems, including drugs, debt, immigration, and the looming pressure of the United States.

HIS 323 Indian-Euro Encounters

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 324 Roman Imperialism

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 325 Twentieth-Century Britain, 1901-1974

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This class will examine the dramatic transformation of Great Britain from world power in 1900 to a reluctant partner in the European Union in 2000. Topics to be covered include: the world wars, Britain's relationship to Ireland, decolonization and the growth of the commonwealth, the rise of the welfare state, Thatcherism, British pop culture, the changing demographic face of the UK, and British politics from Salisbury to Blair. Readings will include fiction and non-fiction and the class will use film and musical evidence to explore Britain's changing place in the world.

HIS 326 Ancien Regime

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Social, political, economic, and diplomatic history of the Old Regime in Europe and France, 1715-1789.

HIS 327 Modern Cities

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course serves as an introduction to the history of modern cities in Europe and North America during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Proceeding chronologically, we will look at a range of cities including Paris, New York, Chicago, Berlin, and Buffalo to investigate their particular histories and to compare and contrast them with the historical developments of other cities. The objective of this class is to introduce students not only to the specific histories of different cities, but to provide an overview of urban history and the range of subjects urban historians study.

HIS 328 History of Brazil

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examines major topics in Brazilian History, including the conquest of Amerindians, the consolidation of Portuguese colonial society, the role of slavery and abolition, the interplay of political independence and economic independence, and the contest between authoritarian rule and democracy. Considers Brazilian women's lives, race and ethnic relations, environmental controversies, and the cultural expressions of religion, music, and sport - all in historical perspective. Covers five centuries of social change, from the arrival of European colonists to the recent past.

HIS 329 US History Since Wwii

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
A survey of modern United States history from WWII to the millennium that examines popular culture, social movements, foreign and domestic politics, and economic developments.

HIS 330 Race, Religion, and Sex in Early Modern Europe

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
We use modern categories of race, ethnicity, and gender to understand diversity in contemporary society. But how did people living between 1400 and 1800 understand differences? We will study how early modern Europeans used race, religion, the biological differences between men and women, and sexuality to write about or define differences among people.

HIS 331 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 334 Islam/Muslim in Modern Southeast Asia

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
India, Pakistan and Bangladesh together have the largest population of Muslims in the world. This course provides an introduction to the history of Muslim communities in modern South Asia: their re-definitions in the modern period and their role in forming new nation-states in the twentieth century. We will read primary sources - political speeches, newspaper reports, diaries, fiction, poetry, film and music - and also acquaint ourselves with South Asian Muslim cultures. No prior knowledge of South Asia is expected.

HIS 335 Culture, Memory and the Uses of the Past

Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
History is not something that simply happened but is produced, crafted and contested in different ways throughout the world. Such variety reflects different methods of recording and remembering the past, and different ways of organizing the past to make it culturally sensible. This course explores how the past is produced, who its practitioners are, and what counts as evidence and proof. Above all we consider how the past is utilized toward a range of aims that make it capable of speaking to what matters in the present. Our examination will extend from state archives and other written sources such as letters and diaries, to monuments, photograhs and paths through the forest. Each source reflects different notions of a usable past, and differen cultural and political reasons why a particular past is worth remembering. At every stage of the course we will ask how the past matters, we will examine the ways it is represented, and we will probe how claims about it imply different stakes and satisfy different ends.

HIS 336 History of the Old South

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course explores the history of the Old South from the colonial period until the Civil War (1600-1860). Topics to be covered include: the development of the chattel slavery, the creation of sectional identity and the idea of the southern exceptionalism, the rise of "King Cotton," southern cultural and religious practices, the plantation community, and proslavery ideology. This class considers the construction of southern identity though the experiences of white and black southerners, both slaves and free, as well as experiences particular to women. The class will combine both lecture and small group discussion.

HIS 337 Intellectual History of Europe

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
An introduction to the intellectual history of Europe since the Enlightenment studied through analysis and important documents of philosophy, political and social theory, literature and art. A central focus of this course will be the consciousness of a crisis of modern society and culture that permeated broad sections of nineteenth and twentieth century thought. The course begins with an examination of the humanistic values of the Enlightenment, traces their fate in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and concludes with the question of their survival in our time.

HIS 338 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 339 Pearl Harbor: Japan Goes to War

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The course will probe the historical circumstances in the decades of the 1920s and the 1930s which led Japan into war first on the Asian continent and then with the United States. Common assumptions about Japan's diplomatic and military aims will be critically reviewed, through analysis of Japanese documents of the time, in English translation. Students will learn how the United States and its allies tried to remold Japanese thought and society after the war. The course will also deal with postwar judgments on Japanese policy and actions, voiced in war crimes trials and the memories of Chinese and Korean victims of the war.

HIS 340 Topics in German History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in German history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 341 Social History of Women in the United States

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course will examine the history of women in colonial America and the U.S. through the 19th century. We will concentrate on social history, looking at how women of different races, ethnicities, classes, regions and ages experienced and shaped their daily lives under the constraints of a given era. Themes will include work, family relations, slavery, childbirth and motherhood, sexuality, and popular culture. We will also look at political issues, including changing notions of patriarchy, women's legal status, the meaning of the American revolution for women, and women's political activism in the abolition, temperance, and woman's rights movements. The central questions will be: How can we understand these issues historically, and what relevance do they hold for more recent history and our own time.

HIS 342 History of Modern South Asia

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
An introduction to the history of modern Southeast Asia and three of its nations: India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.

HIS 344 Spain, Portugal, and the Iberian World

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Broad historical survey of the Iberian Peninsula from prehistory to the present. Topics include: geography of Iberia; complex institutional. Cultural, and religious interactions of the medieval period; the rise and historical development of the Spanish and Portuguese empires; numerous crises that beset the peninsula in the modern period; and the return of stability and prosperity over the last half-century.

HIS 346 19th Century Europe

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course is a survey on European history between the French Revolution in 1789 and the First World War. It covers the major political, social, and cultural developments of this "long nineteenth century." The course addresses the emergence of revolutionary and national movements as well as the recomposition of the European map through wars and state-building. It will pay equal attention to the fundamental transformations of society through industrialization, urbanization, and the emergence of a mass public. Cultural and ideological aspects include the rise of modern science, the changing role of religion, and the main ideologies of the century: nationalism, liberalism, socialism, and imperialism.

HIS 349 American Dissenters

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
American Dissenters uses biography and autobiography, as well as fiction and histories, to analyze the development of lives, movements, and ideologies in American history that challenged mainstream culture, politics, and attitudes. We are most concerned with two problems: the nature of commitment to a frequently unpopular course of action; and the ways in which people choose to explain their motives, fears, and aspirations. Politics as such is of less concern to the work of the course than the study of what motivates people to stand against the main currents of the times in which they live. Among the lives we may study are the following individuals: Karen Silkwood; Lenny Bruce; Joe Hill; Mother Jones; Emma Goldman; Agnes Smedley; Jack Kerouac; and Allen Ginsburg. Among the problems we will discuss are the limits of free speech and the moral dilemmas of whistleblowers.

HIS 352 The American Revolution

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The American Revolution from the initial tensions between Great Britain and its North American colonies through the ratification of the Constitution and the adoption of the Bill of Rights.

HIS 354 American Transition, 1877-1901

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Social, economic, and political transformation of the U.S. during the last decades of the nineteenth century.

HIS 355 U.S. Foreign Relations, 1914-Present

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
An advanced survey of American diplomatic relations in the 20th century.

HIS 356 Social History of Women in the U.S., 1875-Present

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This class will examine women as political activists, women in popular culture, and women's diverse experiences of work, family and sexuality. We will compare late 19th century women's reform movements, culminating in the successful drive for women's suffrage in the 1910s, to the second wave feminist movement spawned in the 1960s and 1970s. We will also explore popular culture as a realm of performance and a powerful site for the creation of female images and ideals. Finally, we will examine birth control, abortion, sexual danger and sexual pleasure as important personal as well as political issues in women's lives. How much have women's lives changed since the 19th century? Have women of varied ages, racial/ethnic communities, and social class been empowered by these changes? How do we assess or measure social change, power, and gender hierarchy?

HIS 357 History of Medicine

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course will survey the social, cultural, and institutional history of medicine in the West, with particular emphasis on the late Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Topics will include: medical theory and practice; the medical and "health-care" professions; hospitals; clinical medicine; the impact of disease on individuals, families, society, and history; the changing experience and meaning of illness; the changing nature of the physician-patient relationship; medical conceptions of race and gender and their historical consequences; colonialism and medicine; and the social and cultural construction of disease, sexuality, and the body.

HIS 358 Renaissance

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Society and culture of Italy ca. 1300-1530, including the structure of the city-state, and changing perceptions of people's existence in the state and the cosmos.

HIS 359 Reformation

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course explores the causes and development of the division of western Christianity into Protestant and Catholic communities. Following a general survey of social and religious tensions in the late Middle Ages, attention will be given to the contexts and political trends in fifteenth century Europe leading to the so-called "magisterial Reformation" under Luther and Calvin. The religious ideologies of the reformers will be examined against the background of Renaissance culture and developing ideas of the nation-state, the rediscovery and transformation of classical learning, the development of literary and historical criticism, the growth of populism and the power of the laity in the Radical Reformation, and the beginnings of anti-Trinitarian ideas among the Socinians. Some attention will be given to the conciliar and theological efforts to reform the Catholic Church, and to the dispersion of Reformation political ideals and theology to the New World, with special reference to New England.

HIS 361 American Cultural History I

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Explores the main contours of American culture from the Puritans of the seventeenth century to the Victorians of the nineteenth. We will examine a wide variety of phenomena-from magic to science, reading to shopping, social thought to social reform, tea party manners to boxing matches-that reveal the values and attitudes of diverse groups of Americans. Much of the reading will consist of "best sellers" of times past, including fiction, children's literature, and propaganda pieces.

HIS 362 American Cultural History II

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
What made America modern? Was it the cigarette smoking, fun-loving Flapper elbowing aside the respectable Victorian matron? Was it leaving the farm for the assembly line or office skyscraper? Was it putting the overstuffed furniture on the patio and redecorating with the latest streamlined look? Or was it leaving the parlor piano behind for the movie palace and the television set? We exmine the transformation of American culture between the Civil War and the Vietnam War, examining the way in which American values, attitudes, and ideas changed as the shape of our society did. We look at issues ranging from the impact of war on American culture to coping with changing race, class, and gender relations, to the rise of mass and consumer cultures.

HIS 363 Jewish Civilization I: from Biblical Times to 1492

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examines the social, economic, religious, and political experiences of the Jewish people from the biblical period until the end of the fifteenth century. Discusses the religious and social expressions of Jews within the broader context of cultures in which the found themselves. Begins with an exploration of major themes within the culture of biblical Israel, and traces the history of Jews from the Babylonian exile through the Bar Kochba revolt. Explores consolidation and expansion of rabbinic Judaism in Babylon and the history of Jews in Christian and Muslim civilizations in both Europe and North Africa. Topics include Jewish law, theological conflicts, philosophic and poetic cultural exchange, Jewish communal organization and economic activities, and anti-Judaism. Concludes with the emergence of Marranos and the expulsion of Jews from the Iberian Peninsula.

HIS 364 Jewish Civilization II: from 1492 to the Present

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Explores the social, economic, religious, and political expressions of the Jewish people from 1492 until the modern period. Begins with an exploration of Jewish life in pre-partition Poland, Reformation Germany, and Renaissance Italy, turning to the Age of Emancipation and Enlightenment. Discusses the rise of the Jewish Question and the various attempts to solve it including emancipation, assimilationism, socialism, Zionism and other forms of Jewish nationalism, emigration to the New World, and Hitler¿s Final Solution.

HIS 365 Buffalo Nash Yrs 1892-1961

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 366 History of Sexual Subcultures in America

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The changing social organization and cultural meaning of same-sex relations in the United States, primarily in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

HIS 368 Modern Japan Since 1600

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Japan's emergence as a modern state.

HIS 371 Social History of Europe

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Eplores the social history of Europe, including gender, culture, family structure, class and race.

HIS 375 U.S. and the Far East, 1898 to the Present

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
America's relations with Asia since the American enunciation of the Open Door Policy.

HIS 376 African-American History to 1877

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course analyzes the history of African-Americans to 1877. We are interested in a number of themes including the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the development of particular notions of race in the United States, as well as the methods of slave resistance. The student will be exposed to relevant primary source documents and will be asked to assess and analyze these sources in light of the larger issues in the course. In addition, the student will be exposed to some of the major debates in African American history and will be encouraged to form opinions and convictions on these major issues. The course is interactive and will include sources from the lived experience of African Americans including songs, folktales, and visual culture.

HIS 378 Nazi Germany, 1933-1945

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The creation of the Nazi dictatorship in 1933 to the Third Reich's destruction in World War II.

HIS 379 African-American History, 1877 to Present

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course analyzes the history of African-Americans from 1877 to present. It addresses a number of themes including the experiences of freed persons during the period immediately following slavery, the legal and socio-economic development of racial segregation and discrimination, along with the persistent and varied forms of resistance that African Americans engaged in as avenues of redress. The course also treats the arts and discusses the development of black vernacular arts during the period, linking, for example, the rise of musical forms such as blues and jazz to the Harlem Renaissance and the Black Arts Movement.

HIS 382 American Religious History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course is an introduction to religion in America from the Puritans in the early seventeenth century to Protestant evangelicals in the late twentieth. In between we will be looking at religious movements of many kinds, including "imports" that took on new forms in the American environment, from African religions to immigrant Catholicism and Judaism, as well as others, like Mormonism and Christian Science, "Made in the U.S.A." By looking at phenomena ranging from witchcraft and religious revivals to the Easter Parade and the "Monkey Trial," we will examine religion as a vital force in American Life.

HIS 383 War & State: European Foundations

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
It has often been said that: "war is the continuation of politics with other means." What exactly does this statement express? How have wars figured into the rise and fall of modern nation states? This lecture course examines how warfare affected the power relations in nineteenth and twentieth-century Europe. Looking at a range of military conflicts including the Napoleonic Wars, the Franco-Prussian War, World Wars I & II, and the Cold War, we will investigate what led to the outbreak of these wars, certain military campaigns and their effects on national politics. Moreover, we will study the effects of warfare on the daily life of frontline soldiers as well as the homefront. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the role of warfare, military technology and its effect on everyday life and national politics in modern European history.

HIS 386 New Deal America

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
When the bottom dropped out of the economy and huge dust storms blew across the prairies in the 1930s, it seemed as if the social world and nature alike had turned against Americans. But the country fought back against depression and drought in this creative and conflict-filled period. In this course we will explore the ferment of experimentation in politics and culture that marked this era, when ordinary people as well as national leaders forged new directions for American life that continue to affect our lives today. We will consider the implications of the "New Deal coalition," the rise of a strong national government, the development of the Social Security system, the construction of public works, the impact of protest movements and massive strike waves, and the response of artists, writers, and the commercial entertainment industry.

HIS 388 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Europe- 1789 to the Present

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
How have European women's lives changed over the last two hundred years? What sparked feminist movements in the late 19th century and again after 1968? How have changing ideas about gender roles and sexuality affected the ways in which European women defined themselves? This course will examine these and other questions through a variety of sources in a broad survey of European cultural, political, and social development during this period.

HIS 390 The Pattern of Chinese History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Survey of the broad sweep of Chinese history from its recorded origins in the second millennium, before the Common Era to about the middle of the second millennium of the Common Era. History consists largely of ongoing interactions between human activities and subsequent human interpretations of those activities. Civilizations arise in tension with the natural world and gradually assume certain shapes that are later modified-but rarely, if ever, transformed. We begin by examining the pattern of Chinese history from the Xia cultural horizon through the Han dynasty, including the rise and fall of five different kinds of cultural-political orders that exerted strong influence on social and economic developments. We then analyze the recapitulation and partial reconfiguration of that pattern of continuity and change under the influence of Indian Buddhism and Mongol rule. We conclude with the idea that the resulting "structure" of Chinese history can help us anticipate the outcome of China's more recent interactions with other civilizations-including that of the "West"-since 1600 CE.

HIS 391 China and the World

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Opinions vary widely from those who believe that China will become the world's preeminent military power to those who think that China's entrance into the World Trade Organization will result in widespread unemployment and social misery that may precipitate the collapse of the People's Republic with unforeseeable consequences for all of us. Is China likely to follow the paths of Germany, Japan, and the Soviet Union that challenged American preeminence in the twentieth century or will it pursue a vision of world order that might provide a more effective alternative to the American superpower? This course seeks to offer some perspective on such issues by surveying the history of China's relations with the rest of the world from the Qing dynasty (1644-1911), that established most of the territorial and ethnic baselines of today's China, through the Republic (1911-), when the U.S. became deeply involved in China's domestic affairs, and into the People's Republic (1949-), that is widely presumed to be seeking to recover China's "rightful place in the world."

HIS 393 Medieval Civilization I

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The first semester of a two-semester sequence devoted to an exploration of the medieval European world. This course examines the earlier Middle Ages, from c. 450 to c.1100 AD, that is from the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West and the disintegration of classical civilization to the First Crusade. This course will focus on certain kinds of historical themes and issues and will adopt a certain approach to historical inquiry. The main purpose is to understand the culture and society of the medieval world. How was society organized? What was the mental outlook? What values were assumed or articulated? In particular, what was the role of Christianity, and how did Christianity as a set of beliefs and as a set of institutions influence, and in turn become influenced by, medieval society? In considering these matters, less attention will be paid to a narrative of events than to a scrutiny of key developments and transformations. We will look at the barbarian world, the Carolingian Empire, the Vikings, the development of feudalism, and the circumstances that led to the First Crusade.

HIS 394 Medieval Civilization II

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The second semester of a yearlong sequence devoted to an exploration of the medieval European world. It is not assumed, however, that students enrolled in the course have previously taken HIS 393 Medieval Civilization I. HIS 393 examined the earlier Middle Ages, from c.450 to c.1100. HIS 394 will consider the later period, from c.1100 to c.1500. This period was marked by new patterns of spiritual and intellectual life, by the emergence of new ideals of aristocratic demeanor and behavior (chivalry and courtly love), by the growth (and the decline) of papal authority, by the re-emergence of cities, and the revival of monarchical power. This course will focus on certain kinds of historical themes and issues and will adopt a certain approach to historical inquiry. The main purpose is to understand the culture and society of the medieval world. How was society organized? What was the mental outlook? What values were assumed or articulated? A particular focus will be the role and significance of Christianity. How did Christianity as a set of beliefs and as a set of institutions influence, and in turn become influenced by, medieval society?

HIS 395 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 396 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

HIS 397 20th Century American Popular Culture to 1945

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
History of American popular culture to 1945.

HIS 398 American Popular Culture Since 1945

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
History of American popular culture since 1945.

HIS 399 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

HIS 400 Comparative Facism

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Fascism was the novel political phenomenon of the twentieth-century world. It remains one of the most widely known and yet least understood terms in the modern political lexicon. This seminar will examine the origins and development of fascist ideology and practice, comparing and contrasting the various fascist movements to emerge throughout Europe in the 1920s and 1930s. At the center of the course will be the question of whether fascism is best defined as an ideology, a political culture, an ethic or morality, a historical era, or whether the term is a useful analytical device at all. Readings and seminar discussions over the course of the semester will consider diverse historical interpretations of fascism, seeking to understand the social, political, and cultural origins of fascist movements and the processes by which they led to such devastating consequences. In the final weeks of the semester, the seminar will examine fascist-like movements outside of Europe and after 1945, analyzing the similarities and differences they present relative to the classic forms of interwar European fascism.

HIS 401 Alcohol and Other Drugs in American History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Explores the worlds of drug users and traffickers; the cultural politics of anti-drug campaigning and enforcement; the central and changing role of organized medicine; and the impact of globalization on drug trade and control in the US.

HIS 402 The Spanish Civil War

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The Spanish Civil War remains an archetype of modern civil war six decades following its conclusion. This course examines the many debates surrounding the origins of the war, the explanations for its outcome, and its legacy in Spanish and world affairs. Students will read personal war memoirs, historical novels, political tracts, and history texts, and will address these critically in oral presentations and written assignments. The seminar will seek to understand the origins and results of the Spanish conflict, and to gain perspective on the significance of revolutionary civil wars in the shaping of the contemporary world.

HIS 403 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 405 What is History?

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Student research on topics that students choose, combined with exploring how historians study the past.

HIS 407 Church and State Relations

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
History of the legal and constitutional issues arising from the religion clauses of the first amendment to the constitution.

HIS 408 Nature & the Environment

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 409 Voyages of Discovery

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Europeans have always been on the move, visiting or trading with other parts of the world, or bent on conquest as during the medieval Crusades. With the discovery of the New World, a new era nonetheless opens when the accumulation of territory and goods would appear boundless, inciting further voyages to find places as yet "undiscovered" and "unclaimed." Through primary readings of explorers' accounts and through secondary analyses, we will chart the changing aims and justifications for such explorations: what drove them, what stimulated individuals who undertook them, who financed them and to what ends.

HIS 411 Tudor-Stuart Biography

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Intensive experience in writing the biography of King Henry VIII from primary sources, such as letters and papers of Henry VIII.

HIS 412 Topics in Women's History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course will explore the history of women in the United States. Seminar readings will begin with the colonial period and continue through the mid-20th century. Topics of focus include women's work and family lives; women's political movements and relationship to the state; differences and conflicts across race and class; the expression and regulation of female sexuality; and changing definitions of femininity and womanhood. We will also read articles on feminist theory that are relevant to historical interpretation.

HIS 413 Topics in American Political History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in American political history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 415 Topics in Renaissance History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in Renaissance history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 416 European Immigrant Lives

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This seminar seeks to understand the aspiration and experiences of the millions of ordinary men and women who immigrated to the USA from Europe in the century of the European mass migrations between 1820 and 1920, and the influence of the presence of these immigrants on the shaping of American society. Students also will gain insights into the central debates among historians of immigration about the nature of these immigrants' experiences in leaving Europe and resettling in the United States. Finally, some part of the course will be spent comparing historical and contemporary immigrations into the USA. The readings will consist of histories, novels, and sociological studies.

HIS 417 The Haitian Revolution and the Atlantic World

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The revolution in the French colony of St. Domingue (1791-1804) was the most successful slave rebellion in the history of the Atlantic. Although this revolution is important in its own right for creating the republic of Haiti, is equally important as part of a larger story of the revolutionary Atlantic world which stretches from English Civil War of 1640s-50s through the American, French and Haitian revolutions of the 1770s-1790s and ending with the Bolivarian liberation of Latin America from Spanish rule. The Haitian Revolution also has had a long history as an inspiration for anti-colonial struggles through the twentieth century. This course will explore the history and historiography of the revolution.

HIS 419 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 420 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 421 Topics in British History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in British history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 422 Topics in American Intellectual/Cultural History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in American intellectual and cultural history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 423 Problems in Modern European History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in modern European history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 424 Topics in American Social History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in American social history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 425 Global Genealogies of Race

Credits: 3
Semester(s): Spring
Type: LEC
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The purpose of this course is to help us develop a more complex idea of "race" as a global phenomenon. Much of what we know, or think we know, about "race" is derived from our particular history and experience in the United States. But American ideas and enactments of "race" are by no means universal. In this course, we will explore the development of racial ideas in a variety of historical and geographical contexts.

HIS 426 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor

HIS 427 Contemporary France

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type:
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 429 History of the American Landscape

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Introduces students to the historical study of the human-made landscape. Focusing on phenomena ranging from Puritan town plans to streetcar suburbs, and domestic architecture to shopping plazas, students learn to evaluate the landscape as the historical artifact of human activity and human choices, shaped by a shifting mix of cultural values, economic patterns, technological developments, and government policies.

HIS 430 Women in South Asian History: 1500 to the Present

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Students will gain an understanding of evolving institutions and practices shaping women's lives, such as the family, law, and religious traditions. Students will also understand the impact of historical processes - the formation and breakdown of empire, colonialism, nationalism, and decolonization - upon South Asian women between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries. We will read a wide variety of primary sources including a history written by a Mughal princess, conduct books, tracks, autobiographies, and novel.

HIS 431 Myth and History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 433 Latin American Native Peoples

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examines the struggle for dominion and survival among indigenous peoples in colonial Latin America as they encountered peoples of European and African descent between 1500 and 1800. Focusing on social and cultural themes, students will explore how warfare, violence, subjugation, resilience, and ethnogenesis shaped indigenous societies, destroying some, transforming others and giving rise to more.

HIS 435 History of Working Women

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Changes in women's work in the home, in the family, and in the labor force in the 19th and 20th centuries. Major themes include the impact of urbanization and industrialization on working women in different ethnic and racial communities, their experience with and in unions and their conflicts with them, and their contributions to labor struggles. Covers the period from the 1830s; examines the growth of new sectors of the female labor force and the beginnings of unionization in the clerical and service industries. Involves extensive reading in primary and secondary sources, class participation, and a paper or research project.

HIS 437 Beyond Paradise: the History of the Modern Caribbean

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Examines the history of the modern Caribbean in an effort to move 'beyond paradise.' Explores major themes in Caribbean history, including encounter, conquest, and settlement, slavery and resistance, piracy and contraband, negritude and decolonization, and tourism and immigration. Considers how the Caribbean has been invented and (re)imagined by artists, intellectuals, travelers, exiles, immigrants, and tourists over the last two centuries.

HIS 438 European Intellectual History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
An introduction to the intellectual history of Europe since the Enlightenment studied through analysis and important documents of philosophy, political and social theory, literature and art. A central focus of this course will be the consciousness of a crisis of modern society and culture that permeated broad sections of nineteenth and twentieth century thought. The course begins with an examination of the humanistic values of the Enlightenment, traces their fate in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and concludes with the question of their survival in our time. Readings will be selected from a variety of thinkers - Voltaire, Goethe, Hegel, Marx, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Kafka, Max Weber, Freud, Brecht, Sartre, Orwell, and Foucault - representing a broad spectrum of philosophic and political opinion. At the same time an attempt will be made to examine the history of ideas within the broader framework of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

HIS 446 Topics in Diplomatic History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in diplomatic history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 449 American Cold War History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This seminar will deal with the history of the U.S., both internationally and domestically, from the end of the Second World War to the dissolution of the U.S.S.R. in the early 1990s. Topics will include the post-war competition in Europe between the Americans and the Soviets in the immediate post-war years, the Korean War, the Red Scare, the nuclear arms race and protests against nuclear testing, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam and the anti-war movement, and the roles of Gorbachev, Reagan, and the nuclear freeze movement during the arms race of the 1980s.

HIS 450 Problems in 20th Century U.S. History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in 20th century U.S. history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 451 Topics in the American Revolution

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in American Revolution history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 452 Topics in Colonial America

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in colonial American history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 454 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 459 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

HIS 460 Special Topics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.

HIS 468 Black Women in US History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 472 Topics in the History of Science

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 475 The Great War and European Society

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The subject of this seminar is the European war that involved (directly or indirectly) every country in Europe, leading to religious and political realignments, rebellion and civil war, and huge civilian losses. It brought the existing system of governance into question and opened the way to what we know as the Age of Absolutism. The readings for the course will cover the center of the conflict, Germany and the Holy Roman Empire, but also France, Italy, the Netherlands, Sweden, and England. Requirements, besides the weekly readings, will include a short historiographical paper and a longer research paper

HIS 480 Topics in Early American Legal and Constitutional History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The interplay between race, ethnicity, and the law during the century after the U.S. Constitution's creation.

HIS 481 A Chinese Dynasty: the Qing, 1644-1911

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This seminar traces the rise, florescence, and decline of the Qing polity in an effort to place it in the larger contexts of Chinese, Asian, and world history. It begins with recent controversies over whether the Qing succeeded in unifying a fifth of the world's people in a single state and in attaining a high degree of peace, prosperity, and social justice because it adopted and carried on cultural traditions called Chinese or, rather, because it was a Manchu conquest empire that ruled the Han Chinese and neighboring peoples (the Mongols, Uighurs, and Tibetans) with greater sensitivity and skill than did previous-or would subsequent-Chinese political orders. The course then attempts to transcend this debate by examining the ways in which successive reigns or, roughly, generations, of Qing subjects (or citizens) situated themselves in time and space. After isolating those perspectives, we will try to use them as keys to the cultural, political, social, and economic evolution of the system from the mid-seventeenth century to the early twentieth.

HIS 482 Problems in Japanese History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 484 Problems in Chinese History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 485 Twentieth-Century China Politics

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This course examines Chinese cultural, political, and social history from 1900 through 1999 with particular attention to its evolving place in a changing world. It addresses such issues as: the nature of the Qing system (an empire?) and the forces that brought it to an end in 1911 (a revolution?); the roles of various social groups, including students, women, workers, and farmers in first founding the Republic and then overthrowing it in 1949; and the conditions of the rural masses, intellectuals, minorities, and the Diaspora before and after the urban protests of 1989.

HIS 487 Self and Society in China

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)

HIS 488 Topics in Slave Folklore

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Investigation of what slave folklore tells us about the nature of slavery and the lives of slaves.

HIS 489 Historiography

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Investigation of the development of historical techniques, patterns, and approaches through time.

HIS 490 Rebellion & Revolution in History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Subject matter determined by instructor.

HIS 491 The U.S. in the 1920s and 1930s

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
This seminar focuses on changes that occurred in American society and politics in the period between the two world wars. Seminar participants will read and discuss books that put forward interpretations of this era and write a research paper based on "primary sources," (that is, evidence that comes directly from the period under investigation). The research paper will deal with a major public issue debated during this time. The primary documents that will serve as the evidence base for the papers will be congressional hearings and the Congressional Record. Especially in the 1930s, during the time known as the "New Deal," committees of the U.S. Congress heard testimony on almost every conceivable subject.

HIS 493 Topics in African-American History

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Varying topics in African-American history, as chosen by the professor.

HIS 496 Public History Internship

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: TUT
Grading: Graded (A-F)
Students learn to connect their historical studies with the world outside the academy by doing an internship at a historical site or museum. Students must arrange the internship themselves. The internship site must have a strong connection to history; some local examples include the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society, the Amherst Museum, Old Fort Niagara, and the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural site. Students register for this course through the History Department's Director of Undergraduate Studies.

HIS 497 Honors Thesis I and II

Credits: 3
Semester(s): Fall, Spring
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
All seniors in the History honors program are required to take this two-semester sequence. The first semester consists of weekly seminars that will help students choose a good topic and teach research strategies. The second semester involves a research project arranged with and carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.

HIS 498 Undergraduate Research

Credits: 3
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: SEM
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Involves a research project arranged with and carried out under the guidance of a faculty member.

HIS 499 Independent Study

Credits: 1 - 15
Semester(s): (No information on typically offered semesters)
Type: TUT
Grading: Graded (A-F)
The content of this course is variable and therefore it is repeatable for credit. The University Grade Repeat Policy does not apply.
Course topic and requirements arranged in consultation with instructor. Except in special circumstances, this course cannot be used to satisfy the department's seminar requirement.

Updated: 13 Nov 2012 06:01:27 EST