Undergraduate Degree & Course Catalog
2016-17

Creative Writing Certificate Program * - Courses

ENG 207 Introduction to Writing Poetry and Fiction
English

This introductory course is designed for beginning writers who would like to take the first steps towards exploring the craft of poetry and fiction. Students will be introduced to the fundamental vocabulary and techniques of each genre. Throughout the semester, the class will also be presented with diverse readings to study and emulate in order to kindle their own imaginative strategies. We will study differing modes of narration (the benefits of using a 1st- or 3rd-person narrator, or how an unreliable narrator is useful in the creation of plot), character development (round and flat characters), narrative voice (creating tone and mood through description and exposition), and minimal and maximal plot developments. In poetry, we will consider the differences between closed and open forms, the use of sound and rhythm, and uses of figurative language and imagery. We will also study prosody and the practice of the line. Assigned exercises will give you the space to experiment with unfamiliar forms. Students are also invited to meet visiting poets and fiction writers at Poetics Plus and Exhibit X readings on campus and in downtown Buffalo.

Credits: 3
Semester(s) Typically Offered: Data not available
Grading: Graded (GRD)
Pre-Requisites: ENG 105 or ENG 201


ENG 390 Creative Writing Poetry Workshop
English

Writing workshop in which students submit original writing for peer review and weekly critical responses and read advanced representations of the genre. Designed to help students develop their style, hone their technique, and produce original poetry For example: Prof. K. Mac Cormack The emphasis of this workshop-seminar course is the relationship of poetry to difficulty. What is the value of exploring poetry that is "difficult", that does not yield an immediately transparent meaning or amalgam of emotions? Topics and contestations to be investigated include open versus closed form; the opaque text versus the transparent, and the variant sociologies of the reader function. Students are expected to actively engage with the various aspects of difficulty they encounter throughout the course and within their own and other students' work, and to regularly submit their writing to the workshop to review. For example: Prof. Myung Mi Kim This course offers a vital context in which you will be encouraged to generate new writing and new thinking about writing. Through a linked series of readings in contemporary American poetry and poetics as well as intensive writing exercises, you will be exploring your vision, deepening your sense of craft, and investigating writing as a process. This series of reading and writing experiments, along with your participation in attentive readings of each other's work, will embolden your sense of poetry's possibilities. Further, the University at Buffalo is widely acknowledged as one of the most exciting sites for the study of contemporary American poetry today, and this course will provide you with numerous chances to hear and meet with a diverse group of poets and scholars of poetry who will be visiting Buffalo during Fall, 2012.

Credits: 3
Semester(s) Typically Offered: Data not available
Grading: Graded (GRD)
Pre-Requisites: ENG 207 or permission of instructor



ENG 391 Creative Writing Fiction Workshop
English

Writing workshop in which students submit original writing for peer review and weekly critical responses and read advanced representations of the genre. Designed to help students develop their style, hone their technique, and produce original fiction. What is the relationship of truth to fiction? How is reality created on the page? In what ways do fictional phenomena become credible in the stories in which they exist? How is the implausible made possible through fictional language? Under what conditions does a fiction support, resist, or transform the notion of story by which it is often circumscribed? Students will explore the relation of fictional worlds to the words that create them through assigned exercises, workshop submissions, and discussions of selected readings. This class has several objectives: first, to teach you how to attend to the fundamental craft elements of fiction (such as plot, character, voice, setting); second, to present you with an array of readings and exercises that will assist you in designing specific, individualized approaches to you own work; and last, to give you multiple opportunities to contextualize and showcase your skills within short and long fictions. Students in this class will try their hand at a wide range of techniquesfrom the traditional to the avant -gardeso that you can begin to situate your work and poetics. We will study methods of revision and invention so that you also become skilled editors of your own work. Writing fiction is a discipline: this course aims to help you hone your knowledge of how fiction is made. For example: Prof. D. Anastapoulos The course emphasizes the development of each student's style and invention process, as well as the practical and technical concerns of a fiction writer's craft. Students will be asked to locate a context for their fictions by situating their work among a community of other fiction writers and to envision how their stories intersect with different schools of fiction. Each writer will be expected to conceive each story within the scope of a larger fiction project as well as to revise extensively in order to explore the full range of the story's narrative themes. The workshop will blend a craft-centered approach with discussions on the form and theory of fiction. We will spend the first third of the semester reading published fictions andcompleting exercises designed to develop your skills at writing complex forms of narrative. In the second half of the semester, we will engage one anothers work in a traditional workshop format: each week we'll read two or three student manuscripts and critique them as a class; ideally, the student manuscripts will embrace the spirit, if not always the model, of assigned literature selections.

Credits: 3
Semester(s) Typically Offered: Data not available
Grading: Graded (GRD)
Pre-Requisites: ENG 207 or permission of instructor


ENG 392 Literature, Writing, Practice
English

The content of this course is variable. Study of diverse writing that informs the contemporary literary scene and marketplace of poetry and fiction, designed for practicing writers. Course readings are selected to broaden students understanding of the craft and history of poetry and fiction in order to improve the practice of their own work. For example: Prof. J. Goldman: Riddles, Riddling, and Reading This course will take the riddle, a curious, ancient literary form, as our point of departure for exploring a wide variety of cultural objects that riddle: that is, works that ostentatiously offer themselves for reading, while simultaneously withholding what they mean. Under study will be riddles as well as New Testament parables, ancient tragedy, detective stories such as Sherlock Holmes and Melvilles Benito Cereno, poems, paintings, perhaps a film. Rather than focus on unmasking the ultimate signifieds behind misleading ruses, we will investigate the repertoire of tactics engaged in the paradoxical task of revealing while concealing (and vice versa). For instance: How does the riddle, whose solution is often a most familiar object, estrange us from what we know? Riddling texts often seem less interested in their own answers than in using contrived murkiness to provoke reflection and to get at an Otherness in the mundane that becomes a socially disruptive and productive force. This spectacular opacity not only seduces us into reading closely, but also allows us to scrutinize our processes of interpretation, leading us to examine social relationships as characterized by degrees of knowing and knowingness, as inflected by power, control, belonging, and exclusion. For example: Prof. J. Goldman: The Poetics and Politics of Names and Naming This course will take up name as it appears in conjectural histories of the origins of language with an eye towards deconstructing how these theory-fictions elaborate relations among words, the world, and the mind. We will look at philosophy, poetry, riddles, and nonsense literature that explores the vexed logical status of names. We will then turn to the proper name, focusing first on toponymy (place names) and cartography studies, interrogating mapping practices as charged political acts, particularly in colonial scenarios where naming is claiming (and attempted erasure of prior knowledges and names). Next we will turn to the disciplines of natural history and biology to examine species taxonomy, the networked naming of all biological organisms, focusing on Linnaeus wild early versions of this system and on contemporary crises in taxonomy caused by species extinction. We will read Romantic and contemporary poets who think critically about taxonomy and put it to work. As we move on to examine anthropological work on kinship and names, we will read comedies of identity in which family structures and gender relations are destabilized and then re-rigidified through naming, study the dynamics of naming as it is framed as social action in speech act theory. The course will end with lines of thought in philosophy and poetry that postulate certain realms or entities as ineffable and there-fore short-circuit naming and name-ability altogether.

Credits: 3
Semester(s) Typically Offered: Data not available
Grading: Graded (GRD)



ENG 434 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
English

The content of this course is variable. Intensive poetry workshop in which students submit original work for review and revision and offer critical response to their peers. Geared to help students produce mature work with an aim toward future publication For example: Prof. Myung Mi Kim This course is designed as an intensive workshop seminar. Throughout the semester, we will experiment with new modes of writing poetry and promote a dialogue between acts of creation and acts of critical attention by responding to each other's work and through studying a wide range of poetry and poetics in a transhistorical frame. We will be listening for ways to extend the possibilities of the poem; we will pay close attention to issues of process, craft, and vision. Students can expect weekly generative exercises. Among the many, many possible arenas of investigation: What procedures, daily practices do you have as a writer? How do you approach questions of form? How does your writing adapt, shift, or test the limits of poetry? The invitation here, then, is for each of you to explore and expand your sense of poetry-- as creative act and as cultural intervention. For example: Prof. K. MacCormack This workshop/seminar course will focus on writing and the temporal, investigating the dynamics of poetry within appropriate historical contexts designed to frame and inform the students? own work. We will examine the poetry considered radical within its own era and compare the techniques employed to create it. Texts to be considered include: the early 20th century attacks on grammar and the sentence by the Italian Futurist and Dada writers, Surrealist automatic writing, Chance Operations, the techniques resulting in Treated Texts, the radical poetics of the late 20th century and early 21st century, and translation as a creative strategy. (Antecedents from earlier centuries will be included for discussion.) Temporality as content will be considered, as well as what happens to temporality within a poetic text. How does time enter writing as both historical content and readerly experience? By exploring these varying dynamics the course will contextualize the multiple meanings of writing poetry at the beginning of the 21st century.

Credits: 3
Semester(s) Typically Offered: Data not available
Grading: Graded (GRD)
Pre-Requisites: ENG 390 or ENG 391


ENG 435 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
English

The content of this course is variable. Intensive fiction workshop in which students submit original work for review and revision and offer critical response to their peers. Geared to help students produce mature work with an aim toward future publication. For example: Prof. D. Anastasopoulos This advanced workshop is specifically designed to give students the opportunity to engage other students work and to receive substantial feedback on their fictions-in-progress: to help students wrestle with, and refine, their craft. While the goal of this course is to help students produce two polished fictions, our workshop conversations will most frequently focus on how young writers can more carefully craft their prose by developing their ear for language. If, as Blanchot poses, fiction is impoverished by nature, writers must carefully sediment with words the worlds they create in order to make their narratives seem real to the reader. This course will encourage students to consider the nature of that authenticity: how the writers use of language helps produce, challenge, or resist the representations of the phenomena she creates. Novelist Paul West puts it another way: Dont grapple with language. Let language grapple with phenomena. For example: Prof. C. Milletti Novelist Paul West advises young writers: Dont grapple with language. Let language grapple with phenomena. This advanced workshop is specifically designed to give students the opportunity to engage other students work and to receive substantial feedback on their fictions-in-progress: to help students wrestle with, and refine, their craft. While the goal of this course is to help students produce two polished fictions, our workshop conversations will most frequently focus on how young writers can more carefully craft their prose by developing their ear for language. If, as Blanchot poses, fiction is impoverished by nature, writers must carefully sediment with words the worlds they create in order to make their narratives seem real to the reader. This course will encourage students to consider the nature of that authenticity: how the writers use of language helps produce, challenge, or resist the representations of the phenomena she creates. As the advanced course in fiction writing within the creative writing curriculum, this course is designed to amplify your writing process, to develop your identity as a writer, and to begin to think about the publishing environment.

Credits: 3
Semester(s) Typically Offered: Data not available
Grading: Graded (GRD)
Pre-Requisites: ENG 391
Other Requisites: ENG 435



ENG 480 Creative Writing Capstone
English

Credits: 3
Semester(s) Typically Offered: Data not available
Grading: Graded (GRD)
Pre-Requisites: ENG 390 or ENG 391
Other Requisites: ENG 480



Last updated: November 22 2021 21:01:55